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Policies

Safeguarding Children/Child Protection Policy

PART 1: Safeguarding children and child protection procedures

 

Introduction

ABC Wonderland is dedicated to the support, development and promotion of high-quality care and education for the benefit of our children, families and community. We are committed to safeguarding children and promoting their welfare.

 

All staff, students and volunteers have a responsibility for safeguarding children, being vigilant and identifying and reporting any safeguarding concerns, in line with this and supporting policies, including:

 

Acceptable internet use policyOnline safety policy
CCTV policyPromoting positive behaviour policy
Data protection and confidentiality policyRecruitment, selection and suitability of staff policy
Inclusion and equality policyRespectful intimate care policy
Late collection and non-collection of children policySocial networking policy
Lock down policySpecial educational needs and disabilities (SEND) policy
Lone working policyStaff code of conduct
Looked after children policySupervision of children policy
Missing child from nursery policySupervision of visitors policy
Missing child from outings policyVolunteers policy
Mobile phone and electronic device use policyWhistleblowing policy
Nappy changing policyYoung workers policy

 

We ensure all staff, students and volunteers have the necessary knowledge and skills to carry out their duties and have sufficient understanding of how this policy and procedures support them in promoting and safeguarding the welfare of children. This is achieved through recruitment and induction processes and by offering ongoing training and support to all staff, appropriate to their specific role.

 

This policy is reviewed annually to ensure it remains in line with statutory guidance. Its effectiveness is monitored through staff and stakeholder reviews, appraisals and feedback to ensure appropriate knowledge and awareness is in place.

 

It is the responsibility of every staff member, student and volunteer to report any breaches of this policy to the Designated Safeguarding Lead (DSL).

 

 

Policy intention

The policy makes it clear that all staff, students and volunteers have a responsibility to safeguard children and young people and to protect them from harm. It aims to raise awareness of how to safeguard and promote the welfare of children and provides procedures should a child protection issue arise.

 

This policy applies to all children up to the age of 18 years whether living with their families, in state care, or living independently (Working together to safeguard children, 2018).

 

Safeguarding and promoting the welfare of children, in relation to this policy, is defined as:

  • Protecting children from maltreatment
  • Preventing the impairment of children’s health or development
  • Ensuring that children are growing up in circumstances consistent with the provision of safe and effective care
  • Taking action to enable all children to have the best outcomes.

(Working together to safeguard children, 2018)

 

Child protection is an integral part of safeguarding children and promoting their overall welfare. In this policy, child protection shall mean:

  • The activity that is undertaken to protect specific children who are suffering, or are at risk of suffering, significant harm.

To safeguard children and promote their welfare we will:

  • Develop a safe culture where staff are confident to raise concerns about professional conduct
  • Ensure all staff are able to identify the signs and indicators of abuse, including the softer signs of abuse, and know what action to take
  • Share information with other agencies as appropriate.

 

We promote:

  • Always listening to children
  • Positive images of children
  • Children developing independence and autonomy as appropriate for their age and stage of development
  • Safe and secure environments for children
  • Tolerance and acceptance of different beliefs, cultures and communities
  • British values
  • Providing intervention and help for children and families in need.

 

We have a duty to act quickly and responsibly in any instance that may come to our attention. If in any doubt about what constitutes a safeguarding concern, refer to the Designated Safeguarding Lead (DSL). If there is a concern, never do nothing (Laming, 2009), always do something, including sharing information with any relevant agencies. Safeguarding is everybody’s responsibility.

The nursery aims to:

  • Keep the child at the centre of all we do, providing sensitive interactions that develop and build children’s well-being, confidence and resilience. We will support children to develop an awareness of how to keep themselves safe, healthy and develop positive relationships
  • Be aware of the increased vulnerability of children with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities (SEND), isolated families and vulnerabilities in families, including the impact of toxic trio on children and Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs)
  • Ensure that all staff feel confident and supported to act in the best interest of the child, maintaining professional curiosity around welfare of children, sharing information, and seeking help that a child may need at the earliest opportunity
  • Ensure that all staff are familiar and updated regularly with child protection training and procedures and kept informed of changes to local and/or national procedures, including thorough annual safeguarding updates
  • Make any child protection referrals in a timely way, sharing relevant information as necessary in line with procedures set out by the Suffolk County Council
  • Ensure that information is shared only with those people who need to know in order to protect the child and act in their best interest
  • Ensure that staff identify, minimise and manage risks while caring for children
  • Take any appropriate action relating to allegations of serious harm or abuse against any person working with children including reporting such allegations to Ofsted and other relevant authorities
  • Ensure parents are fully aware of our safeguarding and child protection policies and procedures when they register with the nursery and are kept informed of all updates when they occur
  • Regularly review and update this policy with staff and parents where appropriate and make sure it complies with any legal requirements and any guidance or procedures issued by Suffolk County Council.

 

Designated Safeguarding Lead (DSL)

The DSL has overall responsibility for the Safeguarding children and child protection policy and procedures. It is their role to ensure that the policy and procedures are implemented to safeguard and promote the welfare of children. They are responsible for coordinating safeguarding and child protection training for staff across the organisation.

 

There is always at least one designated person on duty during the opening hours of the setting. The designated persons receive comprehensive training at least every two years and update their knowledge on an ongoing basis, but at least once a year. They in turn support the ongoing development and knowledge of the staff team with regular safeguarding updates.

 

Designated Safeguarding LeadAlexandra Ataide
Deputy Designated Safeguarding LeadLouise Wright

 

In the unlikely event of the DSL or Deputy DSL absence and to ensure immediate action can be taken, contact the Local Safeguarding Partnership (LSP).

 

 

The role of the DSL

The role of the DSL is to:

  • Monitor and update the Safeguarding children and child protection policy and procedures in line with new legislation and to ensure it is effective. This will be done by making sure that everyone understands the correct procedures during their individual annual review
  • Ensure updates and new legislation are reflected in our services as soon as they are known
  • Act as a source of support, advice and expertise for all staff, students, volunteers, children and parents who have child protection concerns
  • Ensure detailed, accurate, secure written records of concerns and referrals
  • Review all written safeguarding reports
  • Assess information provided promptly, carefully and refer as appropriate to external agencies
  • Provide signposting to other organisations
  • Consult with statutory child protection agencies and regulatory bodies where required
  • Make formal referrals to statutory child protection agencies or the police, as required.

 

In addition, the DSL is required to:

  • Keep up-to-date with good practice and national requirements for safeguarding and child protection
  • Provide information on safeguarding and child protection for the setting
  • Raise awareness of any safeguarding and child protection training needs and implement where necessary
  • Retain up-to-date knowledge of the role of the local safeguarding partnership arrangements and local child protection procedures.

 

The DSL does not investigate whether or not a child has been abused or investigate an allegation or disclosure. Investigations are for the appropriate authorities, usually the police and social services.

 

Sharing low-level concerns

On occasion, inappropriate, problematic or concerning behaviour by staff or other adults is observed but does not meet the threshold for significant harm. This may be classed as a ‘low-level’ concern, although this does not mean that it is insignificant.

 

We define a low-level concern as:

  • Any concern, no matter how small, that an adult working with children may have acted in a way that is inconsistent with our Staff behaviour policy, including inappropriate behaviour outside of work
  • A concern that may be a sense of unease or a ‘nagging doubt’ and does not meet the harm threshold or is serious enough to refer to the LADO.

 

We encourage a culture of openness, trust and transparency, with clear values and expected behaviour, monitored and reinforced by all staff.  All concerns or allegations, however small, will be shared and responded to. All concerns will be shared with the DSL, or other nominated person, as in our reporting procedures. We encourage concerns to be shared as soon as reasonably practicable and preferably within 24 hours of becoming aware of it. However, it is never too late to share a low-level concern.

 

It is not expected that staff will be able to determine whether the behaviour in question is a concern, complaint or allegation before sharing the information. If the DSL is in any doubt as to whether the information meets the harm threshold, they will consult the LADO.

 

Occasionally a member of staff may find themselves in a situation which could be misinterpreted or appear compromising to others. If this occurs, staff are encouraged to self-report to the DSL. Equally, a member of staff may have behaved in a manner which, on reflection, falls below the standards set in our Staff behaviour policy. If this occurs, staff are encouraged to self-report to the DSL. We encourage staff to be confident to self-refer and believe it reflects awareness of our standards of conduct and behaviour.

 

When the DSL receives the information, they will need to determine whether the behaviour:

  • Meets, or may meet, the harm threshold (and so contact the LADO)
  • Meets the harm threshold when combined with previous low-level concerns (and so contact the LADO)
  • Constitutes a ‘low-level’ concern
  • Is appropriate and consistent with the law and our Staff behaviour policy.

 

The DSL will make appropriate records of all information shared, including:

  • With the reporting person
  • The subject matter of the concern
  • Any relevant witnesses (where possible)
  • Any external discussions such as with the LSP or LADO
  • Their decision about the nature of the concern
  • Their rationale for that decision
  • Any action taken.

 

This constitutes a record of low-level concern. We retain all records of low-level concerns in a separate low-level concerns file, with separate concerns regarding a single individual kept as a chronology. These records are kept confidential and held securely, accessed only by those who have appropriate authority. Records will be retained at least until the individual leaves their employment.

 

If the low-level concern raises issues of misconduct, then appropriate actions following our Disciplinary procedures will be taken. Records will be kept in personnel files as well as in the low-level concerns file.

 

Monitoring children’s attendance

As part of our requirements under the statutory framework we are required to monitor children’s attendance patterns to ensure they are consistent and no cause for concern.

We ask parents to inform the nursery prior to their children taking holidays or days off, and all incidents of sickness absence should be reported to the nursery the same day so the nursery management are able to account for a child’s absence.

If a child has not arrived at nursery within one hour of their normal start time, the parents will be contacted to ensure the child is safe and healthy. If the parents are not contactable then the emergency contacts numbers listed will be used to ensure all parties are safe. Staff will work their way down the emergency contact list until contact is established and we are made aware that all is well with the child and family.

 

If contact cannot be established then we would assess if a home visit were required to establish all parties are safe.  If contact is still not established, we would assess if it would be appropriate to contact relevant authorities, including the police, in order for them to investigate further.

 

Where a child is part of a child protection plan, or during a referral process, any absences will immediately be reported to the Local Authority children’s social care team to ensure the child remains safe and well.

 

Informing parents

Parents are normally the first point of contact. If a suspicion of abuse is recorded, parents are informed at the same time as the report is made, except where the guidance of the Local Authority children’s social care team, police or LADO does not allow this to happen.

 

This will usually be the case where the parent or family member is the likely abuser or where a child may be endangered by this disclosure. In these cases the investigating officers will inform parents.

 

Support to families

The nursery takes every step in its power to build up trusting and supportive relationships among families, staff, students and volunteers within the nursery.

 

The nursery will continue to welcome a child and their family whilst enquiries are being made in relation to abuse in the home situation. Parents and families will be treated with respect in a non-judgmental manner whilst any external investigations are carried out in the best interest of the child.

 

Confidentiality

Confidentiality must not override the right of children to be protected from harm. However, every effort will be made to ensure confidentiality is maintained for all concerned if an allegation has been made and is being investigated.

 

If uncertain about whether sensitive information can be disclosed to a third party, contact the DSL or call the Information Commissioner’s Office on 0303 123 1113. They will provide advice about the particulars relating to each individual case, including information which can and cannot be shared.

 

Staff must not make any comments either publicly or in private about the supposed or actual behaviour of a parent, child or member of staff.

 

 

Record keeping and data protection

Confidential records kept on a child are shared with the child’s parents or those who have parental responsibility for the child, only if appropriate and in line with guidance of the Local Authority with the proviso that the care and safety of the child is paramount. We will do all in our power to support and work with the child’s family.

 

The nursery keeps appropriate records to support the early identification of children and families which would benefit from early help. Factual records are maintained in a chronological order with parental discussions. Records are reviewed regularly by the DSL to look holistically at identifying children’s needs.

 

Our Data protection and confidentiality policy will be applied with regards to any information received from an individual. Only persons involved in the investigation should handle this information although any investigating body will have access to all information stored in order to support an investigation.

 

PART 2: Definitions of abuse

 

Definition of significant harm

The Children Act 1989 introduced the concept of significant harm as ‘the threshold that justifies compulsory intervention in family life in the best interests of children’. It gives LAs a duty to make enquires to decide whether they should take action to safeguard or promote the welfare of a child who is suffering, or likely to suffer, significant harm.

 

Whilst there are no absolute criteria to rely on when judging what constitutes significant harm, consideration should be given to:

  • The severity of the ill-treatment, including the degree of harm
  • The extent and frequency of abuse and/or neglect
  • The impact this is likely to have, or is having, on the child involved.

 

This may be a single traumatic event, such as a violent assault, suffocation or poisoning, or it can be a combination of events (both acute and long-standing) that impairs the physical, intellectual, emotional, social or behavioural development of the child.

 

Definitions of abuse and neglect

Abuse and neglect are forms of maltreatment of a child. Somebody may abuse or neglect a child by inflicting harm, or by failing to act to prevent harm. Children may be abused within a family, institution or community setting by those known to them or, more rarely, a stranger. Perpetrators of abuse can be an adult, or adults, another child or children.

(What to do if you’re worried a child is being abused: Advice for practitioners, 2015 and Working together to safeguard children, 2018)

 

The signs and indicators listed below may not necessarily indicate that a child has been abused, but can help to indicate that something may be wrong, especially if a child shows a number of these symptoms, or any of them to a marked degree.

 

 

Indicators of child abuse

 

·      Failure to thrive and meet developmental milestones

·      Fearful or withdrawn tendencies

·      Unexplained injuries to a child or conflicting reports from parents or staff

·      Repeated injuries

·      Unaddressed illnesses or injuries

·       Significant changes to behaviour patterns.

 

Softer signs of abuse as defined by National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) include:

 

Emotional states: Fearful, withdrawn, low self-esteem.

 

Behaviour: Aggressive, habitual body rocking.

 

Interpersonal behaviours:

·      Indiscriminate contact or affection seeking

·      Over-friendliness to strangers including healthcare professionals

·      Excessive clinginess, persistently resorting to gaining attention

·      Demonstrating excessively ‘good’ behaviour to prevent parent disapproval

·      Failing to seek or accept appropriate comfort or affection from an appropriate person when significantly distressed

·      Coercive controlling behaviour towards parents

·      Lack of ability to understand and recognise emotions

·       Very young children showing excessive comforting behaviours when witnessing parental or carer distress.

 

Child-on-child abuse

Child-on-child abuse is also known as peer-on-peer abuse; children are included as potential abusers in our policies. Child-on-child abuse may take the form of bullying, physically hurting another child, emotional abuse or sexual abuse. Reporting procedures in these instances remain the same although additional support from relevant agencies may be required to support both the victim and the perpetrator.  Children who develop harmful behaviours are also likely to be victims of abuse or neglect.

If child-on-child abuse is suspected, then any concerns must be reported in line with our safeguarding procedures.

 

 

Physical abuse

A form of abuse which may involve hitting, shaking, throwing, poisoning, burning or scalding, drowning, suffocating or otherwise causing physical harm to a child.

 

If physical abuse is suspected, then any concerns must be reported in line with our safeguarding procedures.

Fabricated or induced illness (FII)

This abuse is when a parent fabricates the symptoms of, or deliberately induces, illness in a child. The parent may seek out unnecessary medical treatment or investigation. They may exaggerate a real illness and symptoms, or deliberately induce an illness through poisoning with medication or other substances, or they may interfere with medical treatments. This may also be presented through false allegations of abuse or encouraging the child to appear disabled or ill to obtain unnecessary treatment or specialist support.

 

FII is a form of physical abuse and any concerns must be reported in line with our safeguarding procedures.

 

Female genital mutilation (FGM)

FGM is a procedure where the female genital organs are injured or changed with no medical reason. The procedure may be carried out shortly after birth, during childhood or adolescence, just before marriage or during a woman’s first pregnancy, according to the community.

 

It is frequently a very traumatic and violent act for the victim and can cause harm in many ways. The practice can cause severe pain and there may be immediate and/or long-term health consequences, including mental health problems, difficulties in childbirth, causing danger to the child and mother, and/or death (definition taken from the Multi-agency statutory guidance on female genital mutilation). Other consequences include shock, bleeding, infections (tetanus, HIV and hepatitis B and C) and organ damage.

 

FGM is a form of physical abuse and any concerns must be reported in line with our safeguarding procedures. In addition, there is a mandatory duty to report to police any case where an act of FGM appears to have been carried out on a girl under the age of 18.

 

Breast ironing or breast flattening

Breast ironing, also known as breast flattening, is a process where young girls’ breasts are ironed, massaged and/or pounded down through the use of hard or heated objects in order for the breasts to disappear or to delay the development of the breasts entirely. It is believed that by carrying out this act, young girls will be protected from harassment, rape, abduction and early forced marriage. These actions can cause serious health issues such as abscesses, cysts, itching, tissue damage, infection, discharge of milk, dissymmetry of the breasts, severe fever.

 

Breast ironing/flattening is a form of physical abuse and any concerns must be reported in line with our safeguarding procedures.

 

Emotional abuse

Working together to safeguard children (2018) defines emotional abuse as ‘the persistent emotional maltreatment of a child such as to cause severe and persistent adverse effects on

the child’s emotional development.’ Some level of emotional abuse is involved in all types of maltreatment of a child, although it may occur separately.

Examples of emotional abuse include:

  • Conveying to a child that they are worthless or unloved, inadequate, or valued only insofar as they meet the needs of another person
  • Not giving a child opportunity to express their views, deliberately silencing them or ‘making fun’ of what they say or how they communicate
  • Age or developmentally inappropriate expectations being imposed, such as interactions that are beyond a child’s developmental capability, as well as overprotection and limitation of exploration and learning, or preventing the child participating in normal social interaction
  • Serious bullying (including cyber bullying), causing children frequently to feel frightened or in danger, or the exploitation or corruption of children
  • A child seeing or hearing the ill-treatment of another.

 

A child may also experience emotional abuse through witnessing domestic abuse or alcohol and drug misuse by adults caring for them. In England, The Domestic Abuse Act (2021) recognises in law that children are victims of emotional abuse if they see, hear or otherwise experience the effects of domestic abuse.

 

Signs and indicators may include delay in physical, mental and/or emotional development, sudden speech disorders, overreaction to mistakes, extreme fear of any new situation, neurotic behaviour (rocking, hair twisting, self-mutilation), extremes of passivity or aggression, appearing to lack confidence or self-assurance.

 

If emotional abuse is suspected, then any concerns must be reported in line with our safeguarding procedures.

 

Sexual abuse

Sexual abuse involves forcing, or enticing, a child to take part in sexual activities. Sexual abuse does not necessarily involve a high level of violence and includes whether or not the child is aware of what is happening. The activities may involve physical contact, including assault by penetration (for example, rape or oral sex) or non-penetrative acts such as masturbation, kissing, rubbing and touching outside of clothing. They may also include non-contact activities, such as involving children in looking at, or in the production of, sexual images, watching sexual activities, encouraging children to behave in sexually inappropriate ways, or grooming a child in preparation for abuse.

 

Sexual abuse can take place online and technology can be used to facilitate offline abuse. Adult males are not the sole perpetrators of sexual abuse; women also commit acts of sexual abuse, as do other children. This policy applies to all children up to the age of 18 years.

Action must be taken if staff witness symptoms of sexual abuse including a child indicating sexual activity through words, play or drawing, having an excessive preoccupation with sexual matters or having an inappropriate knowledge of adult sexual behaviour, or language, for their developmental age. This may include acting out sexual activity on dolls or toys or in the role-play area with their peers, drawing pictures that are inappropriate for a child, talking about sexual activities or using sexual language or words.

 

Additional signs of emotional and physical symptoms are shown below.

Emotional signsPhysical signs
·     Being overly affectionate or knowledgeable in a sexual way inappropriate to the child’s age or stage of development

·     Personality changes, such as becoming insecure or clingy

·     Regressing to younger behaviour patterns, such as thumb sucking or bringing out discarded cuddly toys

·     Sudden loss of appetite or compulsive eating

·     Being isolated or withdrawn

·     Inability to concentrate

·     Lack of trust or fear of someone they know well, such as not wanting to be alone with a carer

·     Becoming worried about clothing being removed.

·     Bruises

·     Bleeding, discharge, pains or soreness in their genital or anal area

·     Sexually transmitted infections

·     Pregnancy.

 

 

If sexual abuse is suspected, then any concerns must be reported in line with our safeguarding procedures.

 

Neglect

Working together to safeguard children (2018) defines neglect as ‘the persistent failure to meet a child’s basic physical and/or psychological needs, likely to result in the serious impairment of the child’s health or development.’

 

Neglect may occur during pregnancy as a result of maternal substance abuse. Once a child is born, neglect may involve adults involved in the care of the child failing to:

  • Provide adequate food, clothing and shelter (including exclusion from home or abandonment)
  • Protect them from physical harm or danger
  • Ensure adequate supervision (including the use of inadequate caregivers)
  • Ensure access to appropriate medical care or treatment
  • Respond to their basic emotional needs.

An NSPCC briefing (July 2021) found neglect to be the most common form of abuse, with one in ten children in the UK having been neglected. Concerns around neglect have been identified for half of children who are the subject of a child protection plan or on a child protection register in the UK. Younger children are more likely than older children to be the subject of a child protection plan in England because of neglect, although research suggests that the neglect of older children is more likely to go overlooked.

 

Signs of neglect include a child persistently arriving at nursery unwashed or unkempt, wearing clothes that are too small (especially shoes that may restrict the child’s growth or hurt them), arriving at nursery in the same nappy they went home in, or a child having an illness or identified special educational need or disability that is not being addressed. A child may be persistently hungry if a caregiver is withholding, or not providing enough, food. A child who is not receiving the attention they need at home may crave it from other adults, such as at nursery or school.

 

If neglect is suspected, then any concerns must be reported in line with our safeguarding procedures.

 

Domestic abuse

The definition of domestic abuse from the Domestic Abuse Act, 2021 is:

Behaviour of a person (A) towards another person (B) is ‘domestic abuse’ if:

  • A and B are each aged 16 or over and are personally connected to each other
  • The behaviour is abusive.

 

Behaviour is ‘abusive’ if it consists of any of the following:

  • Physical or sexual abuse
  • Violent or threatening behaviour
  • Controlling or coercive behaviour
  • Economic abuse (any behaviour that has a substantial adverse effect on B’s ability to acquire, use or maintain money or other property and/or obtain goods or services)
  • Psychological, emotional or other abuse.

It does not matter whether the behaviour consists of a single incident or a course of conduct.

 

Domestic abuse can happen to anyone regardless of gender, age, social background, religion, sexuality or ethnicity and domestic abuse can happen at any stage in a relationship.

 

Signs and symptoms of domestic abuse include:

  • Changes in behaviour (for example, becoming very quiet, anxious, frightened, tearful, aggressive, distracted, depressed etc.)
  • Visible bruising or single, or repeated, injury with unlikely explanations
  • Change in the manner of dress (for example, clothes to hide injuries that do not suit the weather)
  • Stalking, including excessive phone calls or messages
  • Partner or ex-partner exerting an unusual amount of control or demands over work schedule
  • Frequent lateness or absence from work.

 

All children can witness and be adversely affected by domestic abuse in the context of their home life. Exposure to domestic abuse and/or violence can have a serious, long lasting emotional and psychological impact on children.

 

Where incidents of domestic abuse are shared by our own staff, students or volunteers we will respect confidentiality at all times and not share information without their permission. However, we will share this information, without permission, in cases of child protection or where we believe there is an immediate risk of serious harm to the person involved.

 

If domestic abuse is suspected, then any concerns must be reported in line with our safeguarding procedures.

 

Contextual safeguarding

As young people grow and develop, they may be vulnerable to abuse or exploitation from outside their family. These extra-familial threats might arise at school and other educational establishments, from within peer groups, or more widely from within the wider community and/or online.

 

As part of our safeguarding procedures we will work in partnership with parents and other agencies to work together to safeguard children and provide the support around contextual safeguarding concerns.

 

Child sexual exploitation (CSE) and Child criminal exploitation (CCE)

Both CSE and CCE are forms of abuse that occur where an individual or group takes advantage of an imbalance in power to coerce, manipulate or deceive a child into taking part in sexual or criminal activity, in exchange for something the victim needs or wants, and/or for the financial advantage or increased status of the perpetrator or facilitator and/or through violence or the threat of violence. CSE and CCE can affect children, both male and female and can include children who have been moved (commonly referred to as trafficking) for the purpose of exploitation (Keeping children safe in education, 2022).

 

Child sexual exploitation (CSE)

CSE is where an individual or group takes advantage of an imbalance of power to coerce, manipulate or deceive a child into sexual activity. The victim may have been sexually exploited even if the sexual activity appears consensual. CSE does not always involve physical contact; it can also occur through the use of technology and may be without the child’s immediate knowledge such as through others copying videos or images they have created and posted on social media.

 

Signs and symptoms include:

  • Physical injuries such as bruising or bleeding
  • Having money or gifts they are unable to explain
  • Sudden changes in their appearance
  • Becoming involved in drugs or alcohol, particularly if it is suspected they are being supplied by older men or women
  • Becoming emotionally volatile (mood swings are common in all young people, but more severe changes could indicate that something is wrong)
  • Using sexual language beyond that expected for their age or stage of development
  • Engaging less with their usual friends
  • Appearing controlled by their phone
  • Switching to a new screen when you come near the computer
  • Nightmares or sleeping problems
  • Running away, staying out overnight, missing school
  • Changes in eating habits
  • Talk of a new, older friend, boyfriend or girlfriend
  • Losing contact with family and friends or becoming secretive
  • Contracting sexually transmitted diseases.
If involvement in county lines is suspected, then any concerns must be reported in line with our safeguarding procedures.

 

Child Criminal Exploitation (CCE)

CCE is where an individual or group takes advantage of an imbalance of power to coerce, control, manipulate or deceive a child into any criminal activity. The victim may have been criminally exploited even if the activity appears consensual. CCE does not always involve physical contact; it can also occur through the use of technology.

 

Other examples include children being forced to work in cannabis factories, being coerced into moving drugs or money across the country forced to shoplift or pickpocket, or to threaten other young people. Signs and symptoms of CCE are similar to those for CSE.

 

If CSE or CCE is suspected, then any concerns must be reported in line with our safeguarding procedures.

 

County Lines

The National Crime Agency (NCA) defines county lines as gangs and organised criminal networks involved in exporting illegal drugs from big cities into smaller towns, using dedicated mobile phone lines or other form of ‘deal line.’ Customers live in a different area to the dealers, so drug runners are needed to transport the drugs and collect payment.

 

Perpetrators often use coercion, intimidation, violence (including sexual violence) and weapons to ensure compliance of victims. A child is targeted and recruited into county lines through schools, further and higher educational institutions, pupil referral units, special educational needs schools, children’s homes and care homes.

 

Signs and symptoms include:

  • Changes in dress style
  • Unexplained, unaffordable new things (for example, clothes, jewellery, cars etc.)
  • Missing from home or school and/or significant decline in performance
  • New friends with those who don’t share any mutual friendships with the victim, gang association or isolation from peers or social networks
  • Increase in anti-social behaviour in the community including weapons
  • Receiving more texts or calls than usual
  • Unexplained injuries
  • Significant changes in emotional well-being
  • Being seen in different cars or taxis driven by unknown adults
  • A child being unfamiliar with where they are.

 

 

 

Cuckooing

Cuckooing is a form of county lines crime. In this instance, the drug dealers take over the home of a vulnerable person in order to criminally exploit them by using their home as a base for drug dealing, often in multi-occupancy or social housing properties.

 

Signs and symptoms include:

  • An increase in people, particularly unknown people, entering or leaving a home or taking up residence
  • An increase in cars or bikes outside a home
  • A neighbour who hasn’t been seen for an extended period
  • Windows covered or curtains closed for a long period
  • Change in resident’s mood and/or demeanour (for example, secretive, withdrawn, aggressive or emotional)
  • Substance misuse and/or drug paraphernalia
  • Increased anti-social behaviour.

 

If cuckooing is suspected, then any concerns must be reported in line with our safeguarding procedures.

 

Child trafficking and modern slavery

Child trafficking and modern slavery is when children are recruited, moved, transported and then exploited, forced to work or are sold.

 

For a child to have been a victim of trafficking there must have been:

  • Action: recruitment, transportation, transfer, harbouring or receipt of a child for the purpose of exploitation
  • Purpose: sexual exploitation, forced labour or domestic servitude, slavery, financial exploitation, illegal adoption, removal of organs.

 

Modern slavery includes slavery, servitude and forced or compulsory labour and child trafficking. Victims of modern slavery are also likely to be subjected to other types of abuse such as physical, sexual and emotional abuse.

 

Signs and symptoms for children include:

  • Being under control and reluctant to interact with others
  • Having few personal belongings, wearing the same clothes every day or wearing unsuitable clothes
  • Being unable to move around freely
  • Appearing frightened, withdrawn, or showing signs of physical or emotional abuse.

 

If child trafficking or modern slavery are suspected, then any concerns must be reported in line with our safeguarding procedures.

 

 

 

Forced marriage

A forced marriage is defined as ‘a marriage in which one, or both spouses, do not consent to the marriage but are coerced into it. Duress can include physical, psychological, financial, sexual and emotional pressure.’

 

Where incidents of forced marriage are shared by our own staff, students or volunteers, we will respect confidentiality at all times and not share information without their permission. However, we will share this information without permission in cases of child protection, or where we believe there is an immediate risk of serious harm to the person involved.

 

If it is suspected that a forced marriage is being planned, then any concerns must be reported in line with our safeguarding procedures.

 

Honour based abuse (HBA)

HBA is described as ‘incidents or crimes which have been committed to protect or defend the honour of the family and/or the community, including female genital mutilation (FGM), forced marriage, and practices such as breast ironing.’ (Keeping children safe in education, 2022). Such abuse can occur when perpetrators perceive that a relative has shamed the family and/or community by breaking their ‘honour’ code. It is a violation of human rights and may be domestic, emotional and/or sexual abuse such as being held against their will, threats of violence or actual assault. It often involves wider family networks or community pressure and so can include multiple perpetrators.

 

Signs and symptoms of HBA include:

  • Changes in how the child dresses or acts, such as not ‘western’ clothing or make-up
  • Visible injuries, or repeated injury, with unlikely explanations
  • Signs of depression, anxiety or self-harm
  • Frequent absences
  • Restrictions on friends or attending events.

 

Where incidents of HBA are shared by our own staff, students or volunteers, we will respect confidentiality at all times and not share information without their permission. However, we will share this information without permission in cases of child protection, or where we believe there is an immediate risk of serious harm to the person involved.

 

If honour based abuse is suspected, then any concerns must be reported in line with our safeguarding procedures.

 

Child abuse linked to faith or belief (CALFB)

Child abuse linked to faith or belief (CALFB) can happen in families when there is a concept of belief in:

  • Witchcraft and spirit possession, demons or the devil acting through children or leading them astray (traditionally seen in some Christian beliefs)
  • The evil eye or djinns (traditionally known in some Islamic faith contexts) and dakini (in the Hindu context)
  • Ritual or multi-murders where the killing of children is believed to bring supernatural benefits, or the use of their body parts is believed to produce potent magical remedies
  • Use of belief in magic or witchcraft to create fear in children to make them more compliant when they are being trafficked for domestic slavery or sexual exploitation
  • Children’s actions are believed to have brought bad fortune to the family or community.

 

If CALFB is suspected, then any concerns must be reported in line with our safeguarding procedures.

 

Extremism and radicalisation

Under the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act 2015, there is a duty to safeguard vulnerable and at risk children by preventing them from being drawn into terrorism. This is known as the Prevent Duty.

 

Children can be exposed to different views and receive information from various sources and some of these views may be considered radical or extreme. Radicalisation is the way a person comes to support or be involved in extremism and terrorism; usually it’s a gradual process so those who are affected may not realise what’s happening. Radicalisation is a form of harm.  The process may involve:

  • Being groomed online or in person
  • Exploitation, including sexual exploitation
  • Psychological manipulation
  • Exposure to violent material and other inappropriate information
  • The risk of physical harm or death through extremist acts.

 

For further information visit The Prevent Duty website.

 

If radicalisation or extremism is suspected, then any concerns must be reported in line with our safeguarding procedures. This includes reporting concerns to the police.

 

Online safety

While the growth of internet and mobile device use brings many advantages, the use of technology has become a significant component of many safeguarding issues such as child sexual exploitation and radicalisation.

 

There are four main areas of risk associated with online safety:

  • Content – being exposed to illegal, inappropriate or harmful material such as pornography, fake news, racist or radical and extremist views
  • Contact – being subjected to harmful online interaction with other users such as commercial advertising or adults posing as children or young adults
  • Conduct – personal online behaviour that increases the likelihood of, or causes, harm, such as making, sending and receiving explicit images and online bullying
  • Commerce – risks such as online gambling, inappropriate advertising, phishing and or financial scams.

 

Report online safety concerns to the DSL and to the Child Exploitation and Online Protection Centre (CEOP): https://www.ceop.police.uk/Safety-Centre/

Inappropriate content received via email must be reported to the DSL and to the Internet Watch Foundation (IWF): https://www.iwf.org.uk/

 

Up skirting/down blousing

Up skirting and down blousing are criminal offences. They involve taking pictures of someone’s genitals, buttocks or other intimate images under their clothing without them knowing, either for sexual gratification or in order to humiliate, or distress, the individual.

 

If up skirting or down blousing is suspected, then any concerns must be reported in line with our safeguarding procedures.

 

PART 3: Reporting procedures

 

Public interest disclosure (whistleblowing)

Whistleblowing is the term used when a worker passes on information concerning wrongdoing. All safeguarding allegations, internal or external, current or historical, must be passed on the DSL. We will cooperate fully with the authorities involved and follow any guidance given.

 

We believe keeping children safe is the highest priority and if, for whatever reason, concerns cannot be reported to the DSL or deputy DSL, concerns can be reported anonymously to the NSPCC, the police or the LA social services safeguarding children team.

 

Allegation against our staff

An allegation against our staff may relate to a person who has:

  • Behaved in a way that has harmed a child, or may have harmed a child
  • Possibly committed a criminal offence against or related to a child
  • Behaved towards a child or children in a way that indicates he or she may pose a risk of harm to children, or
  • Behaved or may have behaved in a way that indicates they may not be suitable to work with children.

 

We will make every effort to maintain the confidentiality of all parties while an allegation or concern is being investigated. Dealing with an allegation can be a stressful experience and, to support the staff member, a named person (usually the DSL or Deputy DSL) to liaise with will be offered. The timeframes for an investigation will follow the guidelines of other involved authorities.

 

We reserve the right to suspend a staff member until the investigation is concluded. Further action will be determined by the outcome of the investigation.

 

Founded allegations are considered gross misconduct, in accordance with our disciplinary procedures, and may result in the termination of employment. DBS will be informed to ensure their records are updated and Ofsted will be informed. We retain the right to dismiss any member of staff in connection with founded allegations following an inquiry.

 

All safeguarding records are kept until the person reaches normal retirement age or for 21 years and 3 months, if that is longer. This will ensure accurate information is available for references and future DBS checks and avoids unnecessary reinvestigation.

 

Unfounded allegations will result in all rights being reinstated. A return to work plan will be put in place for any member of staff returning to work after an allegation has been deemed unfounded. Individual support will be offered to meet the needs of the staff member and the nature of the incident such as more frequent supervisions, coaching and mentoring or external support services.

 

If the member of staff resigns during the investigation, we will inform DBS, Ofsted and the police, where appropriate.

 

Support for staff during safeguarding incidents

The DSL will support staff throughout any of the processes listed above and will organise appropriate counselling should this be required.

 

Any member of staff who has concerns about the content of this policy and its procedures, should speak to the DSL as soon as possible. If any member of staff wishes to talk confidentially about any safeguarding concern or any other issue relating to child protection or personal circumstance, it is important to do this as soon as possible.

 

Reporting procedure

We will always act on behalf of the child and will do everything possible to ensure the safety and welfare of any child and so will take all allegations of potential abuse seriously. All concerns reported to staff will be pursued, regardless of the nature of the concern and to whom the allegation relates.

 

All staff have a responsibility to report safeguarding and child protection concerns and suspicions of abuse. These concerns will be discussed with the DSL as soon as possible, as follows:

 Staff member role

on receiving information that causes a safeguarding concern

DSL role

on receiving information that causes a safeguarding concern

Step 1·      Contact the DSL immediately. This must be a verbal conversation to ensure the concern is clearly understood and action is taken

·      If the DSL is unavailable, contact the Deputy DSL, LSP, NSPCC, social services or police until you are able to have a verbal conversation

·      For children who arrive at nursery with an existing injury, an ‘incident outside nursery’ form will be completed. If there are queries or concerns regarding the injury or information given, follow these procedures

·      If it is believed a child is in immediate danger, contact the police
Step 2·      Write an objective report including:

–      Child’s name and address

–      Age and date of birth

–      Date, time and location of the observation or disclosure

–      Exact words spoken by the child (as close to word-for-word as possible) and non-verbal communication

–      Outline of the concern

–      Exact position and type of any injuries or marks seen

–      Exact observation of any incident or concern reported and the names of any other person present at the time

–      Any known confidentiality issues

–      Signature and date of person making the report and the DSL or other nominated individual receiving the report

·      Sign and date report received from staff member

·      Securely store the information according to the nursery procedures

·      If the safeguarding concern relates to a child, contact the Local Authority children’s social care team, report concerns and seek advice immediately, or as soon as it is practical to do so

·      If the safeguarding concern relates to an allegation against an adult working or volunteering with children, contact the Local Authority Designated Officer (LADO) and request a confirmation email of the report, then report the concern to Ofsted

·      A full investigation into any allegation will be carried out by the appropriate professionals to determine how this will be handled

·      Note any actions requested by LADO / Ofsted and follow any instructions received

Step 3·       If you feel the report is not being taken seriously or are worried about an allegation getting back to the person in question, then it is your duty to inform the Local Authority children’s social care team yourself directly

·       Follow all instructions from the Local Authority children’s social care team and/or Ofsted, co-operating where required

·      If appropriate, discuss the concerns or incidents with parent(s), unless it is believed that this would place the child at greater risk of harm

·      Record all discussions (remember parents will have access to these records on request in line with GDPR and data protection guidelines)

·      Follow all instructions from the Local Authority children’s social care team and/or Ofsted, co-operating where required

·      Record information and actions taken

Step 4·      If the DSL is not the owner/manager and there is an allegation against a member of staff, then the  owner/manager must be informed as they have a duty of care for their employees
Step 5·      If the Local Authority children’s social care team have not been in contact within the timeframe set out in Working Together to Safeguarding Children (2018), it must be followed up

·      Never assume that action has been taken

Step 6·      Safeguarding procedures will be reviewed to ensure the process has been applied in line with the policy

 

If a concern is raised anonymously and we have no contact details, we will treat the concern as valid and follow the procedures as above. If a malicious call is suspected, the procedures will still be followed: a child may be in danger. The Information Commissioners Office (ICO) will be contacted to ensure permitted data sharing.

 

PART 4: Recruitment, selection, induction and training

 

Recruitment and selection

Through the implementation of our Safer recruitment of staff policy, we endeavour to prevent unsuitable people from becoming members of staff. Procedures include relevant checks, such as requesting references, establishing the identity of applicant and conducting criminal records disclosures. Where required, staff and stakeholders have enhanced DBS checks. Clear person specification criteria and processes during the recruitment and selection process enable us to determine a candidate’s suitability for the role.

 

We have specific responsibilities, as outlined in this policy, for any staff, apprentices, students and learners under the age of 18 whether living with their families, in state care, or living independently.

 

Induction and probation for staff

As part of our induction process, all new workers will receive basic training on this Safeguarding children and child protection policy so they have the necessary knowledge and skills to safeguard and promote the welfare of children.

 

Within the first week of induction, all staff will receive a copy of this policy. It is the line manager’s responsibility to ensure that the new staff member understands it and is able to follow it. All safeguarding training must be completed by the end of the probationary period.

 

All staff are expected to keep their safeguarding knowledge and skills up-to-date and report any concerns they may have. We maintain records to ensure all staff have received the training they need.

 

Learners on placements or in employment

We hold responsibility for ensuring that learners on placement or in employment are familiar with and sign up to this policy and agree to work within this framework. Learners will receive basic child protection training prior to starting their placement.

 

Learners and students under the age of 18 will be protected as children. Risk assessments will be completed to ensure their safety and well-being are protected and supported during their employment or training period. If situations arise during employment or placement which identifies those aged 18 or under are at risk from abuse or neglect, we will contact the appropriate bodies to ensure the individual is safeguarded.

 

Responding to and recording disclosures

Staff, volunteers or students may receive a safeguarding disclosure. See the guidance below for responding to and reporting disclosures of abuse.

 

Responding to a child’s disclosure of abuse – what to do and say

  • Stay calm and listen carefully
  • Try not to look shocked and reassure them that this is not their fault
  • Find an appropriate opportunity to say that the information will need to be shared and do not promise to keep the information shared a secret
  • Allow the child to continue at their own pace
  • Only ask questions for clarification and avoid asking any questions that may suggest a particular answer
  • Reassure the child that they have done the right thing, let them know what you will do next and with whom the information will be shared
  • Record the disclosure in writing using the child’s own words as soon as possible, but not while the child is talking
  • Includes the date and time, any names mentioned and to whom the information was given
  • Sign and date the record, store it securely and refer the disclosure to the setting DSL and/or manager.

 

Recording a case of disclosure or suspicions of abuse in the community

If you observe a concern or receive a disclosure, make an objective record. Where possible include:

  • Child’s name and address
  • Age of the child and date of birth
  • Setting name and address
  • Date and time of the observation or disclosure
  • Details of the concern using factual information, including the exact words, if relevant
  • Accurate details of the observation, including actions of the child or adult involved
  • Accurate details of an injury or wound seen, including position and size
  • The names of any other person present at the time
  • Name of the person completing the report
  • Name of the person to whom the concern was shared, with date and time.

 

Discuss the record with the setting DSL or manager and follow the procedures. We expect all members of staff and stakeholders to co-operate with relevant agencies to ensure the safety of children.

 

Legal framework

We adhere to all current legislation, as below:

Children and Social Work Act 2017

Criminal Justice and Court Services Act 2000

Female Genital Mutilation Act 2003 (as amended by the Serious Crime Act 2015)

Freedom of Information Act 2012

Keeping Children Safe in Education 2022

Safeguarding Vulnerable Groups Act 2006

The Childcare Act 2006

The Children Act 2004

The Children Act (England and Wales) 1989

The Counter-Terrorism and Security Act 2015

The Data Protection Acts 1984, 1998 and 2018

The Domestic Abuse Act 2021

The Human Rights Act 1998

The Police Act 1997

The Sexual Offences Act 2003

Working together to safeguard children 2018

 

Relevant non-statutory guidance:

Child sexual exploitation, DfE 2017

Information sharing, DfE 2015

What to do if you’re worried a child is being abused, DfE 2015

 

Useful contacts

 

Setting
Main office07972913375
DSL07496666875
Deputy DSL07972913375
Local Authority Designated Officer (LADO)0300 123 2044
Local Authority Safeguarding Children Partnership0300 123 2044
Ofsted (England)0300 123 1231
Police and related contacts
Emergency police999
Non-emergency police101
Child exploitation and online protection (CEOP)Online contact only
DfE counter-extremism helpline020 7340 7264
Other useful contacts
NSPCC Child Protection Helpline0808 800 5000
Childline0800 1111
Kidscape020 7823 5430
National Domestic Abuse helpline0808 2000 247
Modern slavery helpline08000 121 700
Crimestoppers0800 555 111
Internet Watch Foundation (IWF)01223 20 30 30
Information Commissioners Office (ICO)0303 123 1113

 

 

 

Access, Storage and Retention of Records Policy

At ABC Wonderland, we have an open access policy in relation to accessing information about the nursery and parents’ own children. This policy is subject to the laws relating to data protection and document retention and should be used in conjunction with the Data protection and confidentiality policy and the GDPR privacy notice.

 

Parents are welcome to view the policies and procedures of the nursery, which govern the way in which the nursery operates. These may be viewed at any time when the nursery is open, simply by asking the nursery manager or by accessing the file in the office  or on the nursery website. The nursery manager or any other relevant staff member will also explain any policies and procedures to parents or use any other methods to make sure that parents understand these.

 

Parents are also welcome to see and contribute to all the records that are kept on their child. However, we must adhere to data protection laws and, where relevant, any guidance from the relevant agencies for child protection.

 

As we hold personal information about staff and families, we are registered under data protection law with the Information Commissioner’s Office. A copy of the certificate can be viewed at lobby  and office folder All parent, child and staff information is stored securely according to the requirements of data protection registration, including details, permissions, certificates and photographic images. We will ensure that staff understand the need to protect the privacy of the children in their care as well as the legal requirements that exist to ensure that information relating to the child is handled in a way that ensures confidentiality.

 

We are required under legislation to keep certain records about children, parents and also staff members. Due to this legislation, we are required to keep this information for a set amount of time. Below is a brief overview of the information we keep and for how long. This policy should be used in conjunction with the Data protection and confidentiality policy and the GDPR privacy notice.

 

Children’s records: A reasonable period of time after children have left the provision. We follow the Local Authority procedure which states they should be kept for 21 years.

 

Records relating to individual children e.g. care plans, speech and language referral forms: We will pass these on to the child’s next school or setting following our Local Authority’s protocols for transition and sharing of sensitive records.

Copies will be kept for a reasonable period. We follow the Local Authority procedure which states they should be kept for 5 years.

 

Accidents and pre-existing injuries: If relevant to child protection we will keep these until the child reaches 25 years old.

 

Safeguarding records and cause for concern forms: We will pass these on to the child’s new educational establishment e.g. school. In the event that we are not informed of the child’s new placement, we will keep the records until the child has reached 25 years old.

 

Records of any reportable death, injury, disease or dangerous occurrence (for children): As these incidents could result in potential negligence claims, or evolve into a more serious health condition, we keep records until the child reaches the age of 21 years and 3 months.

 

Records of any reportable death, injury, disease or dangerous occurrence (for staff): 3 years.

 

Type of accidents including fractures, broken limbs, serious head injuries or where the child is hospitalised: Until the child reaches the age of 21 years and 3 months.

 

Observation, planning and assessment records of children: We keep our planning filed since the last inspection date so there is a paperwork trail if the inspector needs to see it.

 

Information and assessments about individual children are either given to parents when the child leaves or to the next setting or school that the child moves to (with parents’ permission).

 

Personnel files and training records (including disciplinary records and working time records): 7 years.

 

Signing in book: Up to 24 years as part of the child protection trail.

 

Nursery records and documentation that are not required to be kept are deleted or destroyed in line with the current data protection laws and our GDPR privacy notice which can be found on the policy folder.

 

If parents have a specific deletion or retention request regarding any data that we hold, please raise a query in writing and we will respond formally to your request.

 

This policy will be reviewed annually and amended according to any change in law and/or legislation.

 

 

 

 

 

Accidents and First Aid Policy

At ABC Wonderland the safety of all children is paramount and we have measures in place to help to protect children. However, sometimes accidents do unavoidably happen.

We follow this policy to ensure all parties are supported and cared for when accidents or incidents happen[1] and that the circumstances of the accident or incident are reviewed with a view to minimising any future risks.

Accidents or incidents

When an accident or incident occurs, we ensure:

  • The child is comforted and reassured first
  • The extent of the injury is assessed and if necessary, a call is made for medical support or an ambulance
  • First aid procedures are carried out where necessary, by a trained paediatric first aider
  • The person responsible for reporting accidents, incidents or near misses is the member of staff who saw the incident or was first to find the child where there are no witnesses
  • The accident or incident is recorded on an accident/incident form and it is reported to the nursery manager. Other staff who have witnessed the accident may also countersign the form and, in more serious cases, provide a statement. This should be done as soon as the accident is dealt with, whilst the details are still clearly remembered
  • Parents are shown the accident/incident form and informed of any first aid treatment given. They are asked to sign it the same day, or as soon as reasonably practicable after
  • The nursery manager reviews the accident/incident forms at least monthly for patterns e.g. one child having a repeated number of accidents, a particular area in the nursery or a particular time of the day when most accidents happen. Any patterns are investigated by the nursery manager and all necessary steps to reduce risks are put in place
  • The nursery manager reports any serious accidents or incidents to the registered person for investigation for further action to be taken (i.e. a full risk assessment or report under Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations (RIDDOR))
  • The accident forms are kept for at least 21 years and three months
  • Where medical attention is required, a senior member of staff will notify the parent(s) as soon as possible whilst caring for the child appropriately
  • Where medical treatment is required the nursery manager will follow the insurance company procedures, which may involve informing them in writing of the accident
  • The nursery manager or registered provider will report any accidents of a serious nature to Ofsted and the local authority children’s social care team (as the local child protection agency), where necessary. Where relevant, such accidents will also be reported to the local authority environmental health department or the Health and Safety Executive and their advice followed
  • If the setting is an awarded Millie’s Mark setting, or working towards the award, then the manager or registered provider will also notify Millie’s Mark to meet the requirements under this scheme. Notification must be made as soon as is reasonably practical, but in any event within 14 days of the incident occurring.

Location of accident files: office

Contact Details

OrganisationContact
Ofsted0300 123 1231
Local authority children’s social care team
0808 800 4005
Local authority environmental health departmentenvironmental.health@ipswich.gov.uk
RIDDOR report formhttp://www.hse.gov.uk/riddor/report.htm
Millie’s Markhttps://www.milliesmark.com/

 

Head injuries

If a child receives a head injury while in the setting then we will follow this procedure:

  • Comfort, calm and reassure the child
  • Assess the child’s condition to ascertain if a hospital or ambulance is required. We will follow our procedures if this is required (see below)
  • If the skin is not broken we will administer a cold compress for short periods of time, repeated until the parent arrives to collect their child
  • If the skin is broken then we will follow our first aid training and stem the bleeding
  • Call the parent and make them aware of the injury and if they need to collect their child
  • Complete the accident form
  • Keep the child in a calm and quiet area whilst awaiting collection, where applicable
  • We will continue to monitor the child and follow the advice on the NHS website as per all head injuries https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/minor-head-injury/
  • For major head injuries we will follow our paediatric first aid training.

Transporting children to hospital procedure

The nursery manager or staff member must:

  • Call for an ambulance immediately if the injury is severe. We will not attempt to transport the injured child in our own vehicles*
  • Whilst waiting for the ambulance, contact the parents and arrange to meet them at the hospital
  • Arrange for the most appropriate member of staff to accompany the child, taking with them any relevant information such as registration forms, relevant medication sheets, medication and the child’s comforter
  • Redeploy staff if necessary to ensure there is adequate staff deployment to care for the remaining children. This may mean temporarily grouping the children together
  • Inform a member of the management team immediately
  • Remain calm at all times. Children who witness an incident may well be affected by it and may need lots of cuddles and reassurance. Staff may also require additional support following the accident.

*

First aid

The first aid boxes are located in: Dinning room on the shelf

 

These are accessible at all times with appropriate content for use with children.

The appointed person responsible for first aid checks the contents of the boxes regularly 6 months and replaces items that have been used or are out of date.

The staff first aid box is kept in the staff toilet This is kept out of reach of the children.

 

First aid boxes should only contain items permitted by the Health and Safety (First Aid) Regulations Act 1981, such as sterile dressings, bandages and eye pads. No other medical items, such as paracetamol should be kept in them.

The appointed person(s) responsible for first aid is Alex Ataide, Louise wright and Ana Centeio :

All of the staff are trained in paediatric first aid and this training is updated every three years.

We ensure there is at least one person who holds a current full (12 hour) paediatric first aid (PFA) certificate on the premises and available at all times when children are present (as per section 3.25, EYFS, 2021).

All first aid trained staff are listed in every room. When children are taken on an outing away from our nursery, we will always ensure they are accompanied by at least one member of staff who holds a current full (12 hour) PFA certificate. A first aid box is taken on all outings, along with any medication that needs to be administered in an emergency, including inhalers etc.

Food safety and play 

Children are supervised during mealtimes and food is adequately cut up to reduce the risk of choking. The use of food as a play material is discouraged. However, as we understand that learning experiences are provided through exploring different malleable materials the following may be used:

  • Playdough
  • Cornflour
  • Dried pasta, rice and pulses.

These are risk assessed and presented differently to the way it would be presented for eating e.g. in tuff trays.

Food items may also be incorporated into the role play area to enrich the learning experiences for children e.g. fruits and vegetables. Children will be fully supervised during these activities.

Food that could cause a choking hazard, including raw jelly, is not used.

Personal protective equipment (PPE)

The nursery provides staff with PPE according to the need of the task or activity. Staff must wear PPE to protect themselves and the children during tasks that involve contact with bodily fluids. PPE is also provided for domestic tasks. Staff are consulted when procuring PPE to ensure all allergies and individual needs are supported and this is evaluated on an ongoing basis.

Dealing with blood

We may not be aware that any child attending the nursery has a condition that may be transmitted via blood. Any staff member dealing with blood must:

  • Always take precautions when cleaning wounds as some conditions such as hepatitis or the HIV virus can be transmitted via blood
  • Wear disposable gloves and wipe up any blood spillage with disposable cloths, neat sterilising fluid or freshly diluted bleach (one part diluted with 10 parts water). Such solutions must be carefully disposed of immediately after use.

Needle punctures and sharps injury

We recognise that injuries from needles, broken glass and so on may result in blood-borne infections and that staff must take great care in the collection and disposal of this type of material. For the safety and well-being of the employees, any staff member dealing with needles, broken glass etc. must treat them as contaminated waste.

Parents of children requiring needles as part of managing a medical condition should supply the nursery with an approved sharps box for safe disposal. Full boxes will be returned to the parents.

If a needle is found e.g. in the nursery grounds, the local authority must be contacted to deal with its disposal.

We treat our responsibilities and obligations in respect of health and safety as a priority and provide ongoing training to all members of staff which reflects best practice and is in line with current health and safety legislation.

This policy is updated at least annually in consultation with staff and parents and/or after a serious accident or incident.

[1] An accident is an unfortunate event or occurrence that happens unexpectedly and unintentionally, typically resulting in an injury, for example, tripping over and hurting your knee.

An incident is an event or occurrence that is related to another person, typically resulting in an injury, for example, being pushed over and hurting your knee.

Admissions Policy

At ABC Wonderland we care for 40  children between the ages of 6mths old and 5years old .

 

The numbers and ages of children admitted to the nursery comply with the legal space requirements set out in the Early Years Foundation Stage (EYFS). When considering admissions we are mindful of staff: child ratios and the facilities available at the nursery.

The nursery uses the following admission criteria, which is applied in the following order of priority:

  1. Looked after children
  2. A child known by the local authority to have special educational needs and/or a disability (SEND) and whose needs can be best met at the preferred nursery
  3. A vulnerable child with either a Child Protection or a Child in Need Plan, or in receipt of other local authority support
  1. Children who have siblings who are already with us
  2. Children whose parents live within the area.

A child requiring a full-time place may have preference over one requiring a part-time place. This is dependent upon work commitments, occupancy and room availability. We operate a waiting list and places are offered on an availability basis.

We operate an Inclusion and equality policy and ensure that all children have access to nursery places and services irrespective of their gender, race, disability, religion or belief or sexual orientation of parents.

Prior to a child attending nursery, parents must complete and sign a contract and registration form. These forms provide the nursery with personal details relating to the child. For example, name, date of birth, address, emergency contact details, parental responsibilities, dietary requirements, collection arrangements, fees and sessions, contact details for parents, doctor’s contact details, health visitor contact details, allergies, parental consent and vaccinations etc.

Providers eligible to provide government-funded places for early education

All settings registered to accept government funding must offer the funded places for *two/*three to five year olds for early learning sessions specified by the local authority. At ABC Wonderland we currently provide  government funded places for children; this is subject to availability. These places will be allocated on a first come, first served basis and can be booked a term in advance. Please note for the admissions of the government funded nursery education places we have a termly intake, beginning the term following your child’s *second/*third birthday.

 

All funded sessions are now in line with the flexible arrangement as specified by the Government. When you register your child for their funded place, we will discuss your needs and, as far as possible with availability and staffing arrangements, we will accommodate your wishes. We reserve the right to limit and/or have specific funded sessions, according to our business requirements.

At ABC Wonderland we provide the opportunity to stretch the funding. Sessions can vary from 7am to 5pm so please speak with manager, who can tell you how the funded sessions are offered and what additional charges are for funded sessions.

The funded childcare mention above for 2y old and 3-4 y old are not intended to cover cost of meals, other consumables (such as nappies, sun cream), additional hours or additional activities (such as trips, clubs and so on).

ABC Wonderland charges and additional service charge for each funded session. Please as the manager for more information.

However, if you feel that you might find it difficult to pay for the consumables, please speak with the manager to find alternatives. For example, bring or own snacks or meals for the day.

 

There are other ways that you may be able to get help with the childcare costs, for children under the age of 18years. You might be able to apply for:

  • Tax-free childcare
  • Tax credits
  • Universal Credit
  • Help while you study

 

Allergies and Allergic Reactions Policy

At ABC Wonderland we are aware that children may have or develop an allergy resulting in an allergic reaction.

 

We aim to ensure allergic reactions are minimised or, where possible, prevented and that staff are fully aware of how to support a child who may be having an allergic reaction.

 

Our procedures

  • All staff are made aware of the signs and symptoms of a possible allergic reaction in case of an unknown or first reaction in a child. These may include a rash or hives, nausea, stomach pain, diarrhoea, itchy skin, runny eyes, shortness of breath, chest pain, swelling of the mouth and/or tongue, swelling of the airways to the lungs, wheezing and anaphylaxis
  • We ask parents to share all information about allergic reactions and allergies on their child’s registration form and to inform staff of any allergies discovered after registration
  • We share all information with all staff and keep an allergy register in Blossom app and the in the dinning room and kitchen
  • Where a child has a known allergy, the nursery manager will carry out a full allergy risk assessment with the parent prior to the child starting the nursery and/or following notification of a known allergy and this assessment is shared with all staff. This may involve displaying photos of the children along with their known allergies in the kitchen or nursery rooms, where applicable
  • All food prepared for a child with a specific allergy is prepared in an area where there is no chance of contamination and served on equipment that has not been in contact with this specific food type e.g. nuts, gluten
  • The manager, nursery cook and parents work together to ensure a child with specific food allergies receives no food at nursery that may harm them. This may include designing an appropriate menu or substituting specific meals on the current nursery menu
  • Seating is monitored for children with allergies. Where deemed appropriate, staff will sit with children who have allergies and, where appropriate, staff will discuss food allergies with the children and the potential risks
  • If a child has an allergic reaction to food, a bee or wasp sting, plant etc. a paediatric first aid trained member of staff will act quickly and administer the appropriate treatment, where necessary. We will inform parents and record the information in the incident book and on the allergy register
  • If an allergic reaction requires specialist treatment e.g. an EpiPen, then at least two members of staff working directly with the child and the manager will receive specific medical training to be able to administer the treatment to each individual child.

 

Food Information Regulations (FIR) 2014

We incorporate additional procedures in line with the FIR, including displaying our weekly menus on the parent information board, website or online system identifying any of the 14 allergens that are used as ingredients in any of our dishes.

 

In the event of a serious allergic reaction and a child needing transporting to hospital

The nursery manager or staff member will:

  • Call for an ambulance immediately if the allergic reaction is severe. Staff will not attempt to transport the sick child in their own vehicle
  • Ensure someone contacts the parents whilst waiting for the ambulance and arrange to meet them at the hospital
  • Arrange for the most appropriate member of staff to accompany the child, taking with them any relevant information such as registration forms, relevant medication sheets, medication and the child’s comforter
  • Redeploy staff if necessary to ensure there is adequate staff deployment to care for the remaining children. This may mean temporarily grouping the children together
  • Inform a member of the management team immediately
  • Remain calm at all times and continue to comfort and reassure the child experiencing an allergic reaction.  Children who witness the incident may also be well affected by it and may need lots of cuddles and reassurance. Staff may also require additional support following the incident
  • Where a serious incident occurs and a child requires hospital treatment, Ofsted will be informed.

 

This policy is updated at least annually in consultation with staff and parents and/or after a serious incident.

 

 

Animal Health and Safety Policy

At ABC Wonderland we recognise the value animals and pets can bring to the emotional needs of children and adults. Caring for animals and pets also gives children the opportunity to learn how to be gentle and responsible for others and supports their learning and development.

 

Nursery pets*

At ABC Wonderland we have Fishes, Birdie and occasionally Gucci the dog

 

Our safety procedures are:

  • Permission slips are obtained from parents to seek written permission for their child to be involved in caring for the animal at nursery
  • A full documented risk assessment is completed, including considerations for children with any allergies
  • All pets are homed in an appropriate and secure area of the setting, with areas that are quiet and space away from the children, when needed
  • Only staff have responsibility for cleaning out the animals (where applicable). Protective equipment is used, such as gloves and aprons
  • We ensure all pets have had all of their relevant vaccinations, are registered with the vet and are child-friendly
  • Pets are not allowed near food, dishes, worktops or food preparation areas. Children will wash their hands with soap and water after handling animals and will be encouraged not to place their hands in their mouths while pets are being handled. Staff explain the importance of this to the children
  • Children are encouraged to leave their comforters and dummies away from the animals to ensure cross-contamination is limited.

 

Pets from home

  • If a child brings a pet from home to visit the nursery as a planned activity, parents of all children who will be in contact or in the same area as the pet are informed. We obtain written permission from parents to ensure no child has an allergy or phobia. We complete a full, documented risk assessment prior to the pet visiting and analyse any risks before this type of activity is authorised
  • Pets are not allowed near food, dishes, worktops or food preparation areas. Children will wash their hands with soap and water after handling animals and will be encouraged not to place their hands in their mouths during the activity. The staff will explain the importance of this to the children
  • Children will be encouraged to leave their comforters and dummies away from the animals to ensure cross-contamination is limited.

 

Visits to farms

  • A site visit is made by a senior member of staff before an outing to a farm can be arranged. We check that the farm is well-managed, that the grounds and public areas are as clean as possible and that suitable first aid arrangements are in place. Animals should be prohibited from any outdoor picnic areas
  • We check that the farm has suitable hand washing facilities, appropriately signposted, with running water, soap and disposable towels or hot air hand dryers. Any portable water taps should be appropriately designed in a suitable area
  • We ensure that there is an adequate number of adults to supervise the children, taking into account the needs of the children
  • We explain to the children that they will not be allowed to eat or drink anything, including crisps and sweets, or place their hands in their mouths, while touring the farm because of the risk of infection and explain why
  • We ensure suitable precautions are in place where appropriate e.g. in restricted areas such as near slurry pits or where animals are isolated.

 

During the visit

  • If children are in contact with, or feeding animals, we will warn them not to place their faces against the animals or put their hands in their own mouths afterwards, and explain why
  • We will encourage children to leave comforters (e.g. soft toys and blankets) and dummies either at nursery, in the transport used or in a bag carried by a member of staff to ensure cross-contamination is limited
  • After contact with animals and particularly before eating and drinking, we will ensure all children, staff and volunteers wash and dry their hands thoroughly. If young children are in the group, hand washing will be supervised. We will always explain why the children need to do this
  • Meals, breaks or snacks will be taken well away from the areas where animals are kept and children will be warned not to eat anything which has fallen on the ground. Any crops produced on the farm will be thoroughly washed in potable water before consumption
  • We will ensure children do not consume unpasteurised produce e.g. milk or cheese
  • Manure or slurry presents a particular risk of infection and children will be warned against touching it. If they do touch it, we will ensure that they thoroughly wash and dry their hands immediately
  • We will ensure all children, staff and volunteers wash their hands thoroughly before departure
  • We will ensure footwear and clothing is as free as possible from faecal materials.

 

Arrivals and Departures Policy

At ABC Wonderland we give a warm welcome and goodbye to every child and family on their arrival and departure, as well as ensuring the safety of children, parents, visitors, employees, volunteers and students.

 

Parents are requested to pass the care of their child to a specific member of staff who will ensure his/her safety (this is usually a child’s key person). The staff member receiving the child immediately records his/her arrival in the daily attendance register. The staff member also records any specific information provided by the parents, including the child’s interests, experiences and observations from home.

 

If the parent requests the child is given medicine during the day the staff member must ensure that the Medication procedure is followed.

 

If the child is to be collected by someone who is not the parent at the end of the session, there is an agreed procedure that must be followed to identify the designated person. Photo identification *and a password are also required, where possible, for the designated adult. Parents are informed about these arrangements and reminded about them regularly. Other than the parents or legal guardian of the child, we do not allow anyone under the age of 18 to collect. If anyone under the age of 18 arrives to collect a child, the parent will be contacted.

 

The child’s key person or other nominated staff member must plan the departure of the child. This should include opportunities to discuss the child’s day with the parent in addition to what may already be shared via electronic systems e.g. meals, sleep time, activities, interests, progress and friendships. The parent should be told about any accidents or incidents and the appropriate records must be signed by the parent before departure. Where applicable, all medicines should be recovered from the medicine box or fridge after the parent has arrived and handed to him/her personally. The Medication policy is to be followed regarding parent signatures.

 

The nursery will not release a child to anyone other than the known parent unless an agreement has been made at the time of arrival. In the case of any emergency such as a parent being delayed and arranging for a designated adult to collect a child, the parent should inform the designated adult of the agreed procedure and contact the nursery about the arrangements as soon as possible. If in any doubt the nursery will check the person’s identity by ringing the child’s parent or their emergency contact number (please refer to the Late collection and non-collection of children policy).

 

On departure, the staff member releasing the child must mark the attendance register immediately to show that the child has left the premises. However, if you are late there is charges for late collection of the Child- £10 per 15 minutes that you are late in collecting the Child, without prior agreement. 

 

Parents will be informed and reminded not to allow any other person onto the premises when dropping off or collecting to ensure safety at all times.

In the unlikely event that someone gains unauthorised access to the premises and if it feels safe to do so, a member of staff will ask the person the purpose of their visit.  If needed our Lockdown policy will be initiated by staff and the police will be called. In any cases where someone has gained unauthorised access to the premises, we will revisit our Arrivals and departures procedures and risk assessment.

 

Adults arriving under the influence of alcohol or drugs

Please refer to the Alcohol and substance misuse policy.

 

Arrivals and departures of visitors

For arrivals and departures of visitors the nursery requires appropriate records to be completed on entry and exit e.g. in the visitors book. Please refer to the Supervision of visitors policy for further information.

 

Staff, students and volunteers

Staff, students and volunteers are responsible for ensuring they sign themselves in and out of the building, including on breaks and lunchtimes.

 

Caring for Babies and Toddlers Policy

At ABC Wonderland we care for babies and toddler under the age of two as well as pre-school children.

 

We ensure their health, safety and well-being through the following:

  • Implementing the EYFS requirements at all times and caring for babies and toddlers in a separate base room with a maximum number of ( 9) children with a minimum ratio of 1:3 and 5 children to the ratio of 1:5 for children over 2y old
  • Allocating each baby and toddler a key person who works in partnership with their parent to meet their individual needs and routines
  • Having well qualified staff that understand the needs of babies and toddlers, ensuring that at least half of the staff team caring for children under the age of two have undertaken specific training for working with babies
  • Ensuring babies and toddlers have opportunities to see and play with older children whilst at nursery
  • Toddlers transitioning to the older age groups or rooms when assessed as appropriate (see separate Transitions policy)
  • Staff supervising all babies and toddlers and organising the environment to support both non-mobile and mobile babies and toddlers.

 

Environment

  • The environment, equipment and resources are risk assessed and checked daily before the children access the rooms or area. This includes checking the stability of cots and areas around, low/highchairs and ensuring restraints on these, pushchairs and prams are intact and working
  • All doors are fitted with viewing panels and door finger-guards to prevent accidents
  • Outdoor shoes are removed or covered when entering the baby and toddler area(s). Staff remind parents and visitors to adhere to this procedure. Flooring is cleaned regularly
  • Sterilisers are washed out and cleaned daily
  • Large pieces of furniture are fixed to the walls to stop them falling on top of babies and young children
  • Play and learning is planned in line with children’s individual interests and the EYFS learning and development requirements.

 

Resources

  • Care is taken to ensure that babies and toddlers do not have access to resources or activities containing small pieces, which may be swallowed or otherwise injure the child
  • Babies and toddlers are closely supervised during all activities
  • Resources and equipment that babies and young children have placed in their mouth are cleaned and/or sterilised after use
  • All resources are frequently cleaned
  • Soft furnishings are frequently cleaned
  • The use of resources that restrict babies movement such as baby walkers, pushchairs, jumparoos, etc will not be used on a regular basis because these can contribute to delayed physical development. We follow NHS guidelines which recommends that if these resources are to be used then it should be for no more than 20 minutes at a time.

 

Intimate Care 

  • Babies and toddlers have their nappies changed according to their individual needs and requirements by their key person, wherever possible. Checks are documented with the time and staff initials and information is shared with parents
  • When developmentally appropriate, we work closely with parents to sensitively support toilet training in a way that suits the individual needs of the child
  • Potties are washed and disinfected after every use. Changing mats are wiped with anti-bacterial cleanser before and after every nappy change
  • Staff ensure all the equipment is ready before babies and toddlers are placed on the changing mat
  • No child is ever left unattended during nappy changing time
  • Intimate care times are seen as opportunities for one-to-one interactions
  • Staff do not change nappies whilst pregnant until a risk assessment has been discussed and conducted. Students only change nappies with the support and close supervision of a qualified member of staff (see separate Student policy)
  • Cameras, mobile phones and other equipment capable of recording images (Smartwatches, tablets etc) are not permitted in toilet and nappy changing areas
  • Nappy sacks and creams are not left in reach of babies and children
  • We always follow systems in place to ensure there is an adequate supply of clean bedding, towels and spare clothes.

 

See separate Nappy changing policy and Respectful intimate care policy.

 

Sleep

  • We follow the NHS guidance to reduce the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS)
  • Each baby and toddler has labelled nursery bedding which is washed at least weekly and when necessary, this takes into account any allergies and irritation to soap powders and any individual needs. For example if a child prefers to sleep in a sleeping bag, we will ask parents to bring one from home
  • All cot mattresses and sleep mats meet necessary safety standards. We use a firm and flat mattress and waterproof mattress covers
  • Safe sleep guidance is followed at all times, babies are always laid to sleep on their back, with their feet touching the foot of the cot. Children under two years are not given pillows, cot bumpers or any soft furnishings in order to prevent risk of suffocation
  • We also share safe sleep advice with parents
  • We ensure that sheets or thin blankets come no higher than the baby’s shoulders, to prevent them wriggling under the covers. We make sure the covers are securely tucked in so they cannot slip over the baby’s head
  • Only sheets and blankets that are of good condition are used, any loose threads are removed
  • Cots are checked before use to ensure no items are within reach i.e. hanging over or beside the cot (fly nets, cables, cord blinds)
  • Babies sleeping outside have cat/fly nets over their prams and we ensure we only use prams that lie flat for sleeping so babies and toddlers are supported
  • Sleeping children are supervised at all times and checks are completed every 10 minutes. This may increase to five minutes for younger babies and/or new babies. Checks are documented with the time and staff initials on the sleep check form and times are shared with parents.

 

See separate Sleep policy.

 

Bottles 

  • Feeding times are seen as an opportunity for bonding between practitioner and child and where possible babies are fed by their key person
  • Food and milk for babies is prepared in a separate (within the kitchen) which is specifically designated for this preparation. Handwashing is completed before preparation is undertaken
  • Bottles of formula milk are only made up as and when the child needs them. Following the Department of Health guidelines, we only use recently boiled water to make formula bottles (left for no longer than 30 minutes to cool). We do not use cooled boiled water that is reheated. They are then cooled to body temperature, which means they should feel warm or cool, but not hot. Bottles are tested with a sterilised thermometer to ensure they are an appropriate temperature for the child to drink safely
  • Bottles are only made following the instructions on the formula. If, during the making process, there are discrepancies, a new bottle will be made
  • All new staff will be shown the procedure, and only when competent and confident will they make them on their own. Students are fully supervised
  • Nursery bottles and teats are thoroughly cleaned with hot soapy water and sterilised after use (they are not washed in the dishwasher). They are replaced as and when required
  • Unwanted or left over contents of bottles are disposed of after two hours
  • Babies are never left propped up or laid in a cot or a pram with bottles as it is both dangerous and inappropriate
  • A designated area is available for mothers who wish to breastfeed their babies or express milk
  • Labelled breast milk is stored in the fridge.

 

Mealtimes

  • All low/highchairs used for feeding are fitted with restraints and these are used at all times. Children are never left unattended when eating or when in highchairs. Restraints are removed and washed weekly or as needed
  • Mealtimes are seen as social occasions and promote interactions. Staff always sit with babies and young children, interacting, promoting communication and social skills
  • All children are closely supervised whilst eating and if any choking incidents occur paediatric first aid will be administered
  • Babies and young children are encouraged to feed themselves with support, as required
  • We work together with parents regarding weaning and offer any support, as required.

 

Comforters and dummies

  • We have a separate Use of dummies in nursery policy to promote communication and language development
  • If dummies are used, they are cleaned and sterilised. This also applies to dummies which have been dropped on the floor
  • All dummies are stored in separate labelled containers to ensure no cross-contamination occurs
  • Dummies are disposed of if they become damaged
  • Comforters including teddies and blankets are kept safe and provided at sleep times, or if the child becomes unsettled.

 

 

Children's Well-being in the Nursery

Well-being is a broad term that covers how you feel about yourself and your life. It encompasses the physical, emotional (and mental), social and spiritual areas of a person. Under the Early Years Foundations Stage (EYFS) this is covered in the children’s personal, social, emotional development and physical development, both of which are prime areas of learning and development.

 

Physical well-being covers everything physical to do with the body:

  • Growth and development
  • Moving and keeping physically fit
  • Caring for personal health (e.g. washing, cleaning teeth, etc.)
  • Eating a balanced and nutritious diet
  • Rest and appropriate sleep patterns.

 

Mental and emotional well-being includes:

  • Acknowledging, expressing and coping with feelings and emotions
  • Thought processes
  • Reducing stress and anxiety.

 

Social well-being includes:

  • Relationships
  • Family (close and extended)
  • Friends
  • The feeling of belonging and acceptance
  • Compassion and caring approaches.

 

Spiritual well-being can cover the following:

  • Value and beliefs held
  • Personal identity and self-awareness.

 

Children’s physical well-being is supported through our carefully planned curriculum programme which supports all types of gross and fine motor play both inside and outside. We provide nutritionally balanced meals for the children and support our staff to make healthy choices in regards to their physical health.

 

Personal hygiene is supported in children of all ages, explaining the reasons for hand washing, tooth brushing and other routines.

 

Children are provided with quiet and calming areas for rest, sleep and relaxation. This supports both their physical and mental well-being.  We support children to make strong attachments with their key person as well as forge relationships with their peers in order to support their social well-being. We offer opportunities and resources for children to play singly, in pairs, small groups and large groups to support this area of development.

 

Children’s mental and emotional well-being is supported. We provide a safe environment that allows for caregiver to child co-regulation. This practice supports the process of children building the capacity for self-regulation, through providing activities in which children are able to recognise and express their emotions, including emotional literacy.   This enables us to provide support for children who may be experiencing big emotions they cannot cope with just yet, including sadness and over-excitement. We support children’s self-regulation through carefully planned activities and resources, modelling calming strategies and naming and talking about feelings and by providing opportunities for children to practise their self-regulation skills.

 

Staff use the Promoting positive behaviour policy to ensure a consistent approach.

 

Staff are able to recognise when a child may need support with their emotions and will provide this one-to-one or in a small group, whichever is more appropriate. Teaching children to recognise and manage their emotions at a young age helps support foundations for doing this throughout their life.

Complaints and Compliments Policy

At ABC Wonderland we strive to provide the highest quality of care and education for our children and families and believe that all parents are treated with care, courtesy and respect.

 

We hope that at all times parents are happy and satisfied with the quality and service provided and we encourage parents to voice their appreciation to the staff concerned and/or management. We record all compliments and share these with staff.

 

We welcome any suggestions from parents on how we can improve our services, and will give prompt and serious attention to any concerns that parents may have. Concerns will be dealt with professionally and promptly to ensure that any issues arising from them are handled effectively and to ensure the welfare of all children, enable ongoing cooperative partnership with parents and to continually improve the quality of the nursery.

 

We have a formal procedure for dealing with complaints where we are not able to resolve a concern. Where any concern or complaint relates to child protection, we follow our Safeguarding children and child protection policy.

 

Internal complaints procedure

 

Stage 1

If any parent should have cause for concern or any queries regarding the care or early learning provided by the nursery, they should in the first instance take it up with the child’s key person, a senior member of staff or room leader.  If this is not resolved, we ask them to discuss this verbally with the manager.

 

Stage 2

If the issue still remains unresolved or parents feel they have received an unsatisfactory outcome, then they must present their concerns in writing as a formal complaint to the nursery manager. The manager will then investigate the complaint in relation to the fulfilment of the EYFS requirements and report back to the parent within [insert number of working days, advise between five and within 28] The manager will document the complaint fully, the actions taken and the outcome in relation to it in the complaints log book.

(Most complaints are usually resolved informally at stage 1 or 2.)

 

Stage 3

If the matter is still not resolved, the nursery will hold a formal meeting between the manager, parent and a senior staff member to ensure that it is dealt with comprehensively. The nursery will make a record of the meeting and document any actions. All parties present at the meeting will review the accuracy of the record, and be asked to sign to agree it and receive a copy. This will signify the conclusion of the procedure.

 

Stage 4

If the matter cannot be resolved to their satisfaction, then parents have the right to raise the matter with Ofsted. Parents are made aware that they can contact Ofsted whenever they have a concern, including at all stages of the complaints procedure, and information on how to contact Ofsted is displayed in the setting. Ofsted is the registering authority for nurseries in England and investigates all complaints that suggest a provider may not be meeting the requirements of the nursery’s registration. It risk assesses all complaints made and may visit the nursery to carry out a full inspection where it believes requirements are not met.

 

A record of complaints will be kept in the nursery. The record will include the name of the complainant, the nature of the complaint, date and time complaint received, action(s) taken, outcomes of any investigations and any information given to the complainant including a dated response.

 

Parents will be able to access this record if they wish; however, all personal details relating to any complaint will be stored confidentially and will be only accessible by the parties involved. Ofsted inspectors will have access to this record at any time during visits to ensure actions have been met appropriately.

 

The record of complaints is made available to Ofsted on request. We will follow this procedure for any other compliments and complaints received from visitors to the provider, where applicable.

 

Contact details for Ofsted:

 

Email: enquiries@ofsted.gov.uk

 

Telephone: 0300 123 1231   

 

By post:

Ofsted
Piccadilly Gate
Store Street
Manchester
M1 2WD

 

Parents will also be informed if the nursery becomes aware that they are going to be inspected and after inspection the nursery will provide a copy of the report to parents of children attending on a regular basis.

 

 

Critical Incident Policy

At ABC Wonderland  we understand we need to plan for all eventualities to ensure the health, safety and welfare of all the children we care for. With this in mind, we have a critical incident policy in place to ensure our nursery is able to operate effectively in the case of a critical incident. These include:

  • Flood
  • Fire
  • Burglary
  • Abduction or threatened abduction of a child
  • Bomb threat or terrorism attack
  • National outbreaks of infection or health pandemic
  • Any other incident that may affect the care of the children in the nursery.

 

If any of these incidents impact on the ability of the nursery to operate, we will contact parents via *phone/text message at the earliest opportunity e.g. before the start of the nursery day.

 

Flood

There is always a danger of flooding from adverse weather conditions or through the water and central heating systems. We cannot anticipate adverse weather; however, we can ensure that we take care of all our water and heating systems through regular maintenance and checks to reduce the option of flooding in this way. Our central heating systems are checked and serviced annually by a registered gas engineer and they conform to all appropriate guidelines and legislation.

 

If flooding occurs during the nursery day, the nursery manager will make a decision based on the severity and location of this flooding. It may be deemed necessary to follow the same procedure as the fire evacuation procedure. In this instance children will be kept safe and parents will be notified in the same way as the fire procedure (see Fire safety policy).

 

Should the nursery be assessed as unsafe through flooding, fire or any other incident we will follow our Nursery operational plan and provide *care in another location or options for childcare facilities in the local area.

 

Fire

Please refer to the Fire safety policy.

 

Burglary

The management of the nursery follow a lock up procedure which ensures all doors and windows are closed and locked before vacating the premises. Alarm systems are used and in operation during all hours the nursery is closed.

The manager or most senior member of staff on site will always check the premises as they arrive in the morning.

Should they discover that the nursery has been broken into they will follow the procedure below:

  • In an emergency dial 999 or non-emergency dial 101 with as many details as possible, i.e. name and location, details of what you have found and emphasise this is a nursery and children will be arriving soon
  • Contain the area to ensure no-one enters until the police arrive
  • Where it is safe to do so, the staff will direct parents and children to a separate area as they arrive. If all areas have been disturbed staff will follow police advice. This may include temporary short-term closure and/or following the relocation procedure under the flood section wherever necessary to ensure the safety of the children
  • The manager on duty will help the police with enquiries e.g. by identifying items missing, areas of entry etc.
  • A manager will be available at all times during this time to speak to parents, reassure children and direct enquires
  • Management will assess the situation following a theft and ensure parents are kept up to date with developments relating to the operation of the nursery
  • Arrangements will be made to ensure the nursery is made safe and secure again.

 

Abduction or threatened abduction of a child

We have secure safety procedures in place to ensure children are safe while in our care, including taking reasonable steps to ensure that children do not leave the premises unsupervised and to prevent unauthorised persons entering the premises and at risk of abduction.

 

Staff are vigilant at all times and report any persons lingering on nursery property immediately. All doors and gates to the nursery are locked and cannot be accessed unless staff members allow individuals in. Parents are reminded on a regular basis not to allow anyone into the building whether they are known to them or not. We also have visual reminders about closing the door behind them to prevent tailgating (another person accessing entry behind them).   Visitors and general security are covered in more detail in the Supervision of visitor’s policy.

 

Children will only be released into the care of a designated adult; see the Arrivals and departures policy for more details. Parents are requested to inform the nursery of any potential custody proceedings or family concerns as soon as they arise, so the nursery is able to support the child. The nursery will not take sides in relation to any custody arrangements and will remain neutral for the child. If an absent parent arrives to collect their child, the nursery will not restrict access unless a court order is in place. Parents are requested to issue the nursery with a copy of these documents should they be in place. We will consult our solicitors with regards to any concerns over custody and relay any information back to the parties involved.

 

If a member of staff witnesses an actual or potential abduction from nursery, we have the following procedures which are followed immediately:

  • The staff member will notify management immediately and the manager will take control, dialling 999 and requesting the police, instructions from the emergency response team will be followed
  • The parent(s) will be contacted
  • All other children will be kept safe and secure, reassured and calmed where necessary
  • The police will be given as many details as possible including details of the child, description of the abductor, car registration number if used, time and direction of travel if seen and any family situations that may have impacted on this abduction
  • Any incidents must be recorded in writing as soon as practicably possible including the outcome, who was abducted, time identified, notification to police and findings
  • In the unlikely event that the child is not found, the nursery will follow the local authority and police procedure
  • Ofsted will be contacted and informed of the incident
  • With incidents of this nature parents, carers, children and staff may require support and reassurance following the traumatic experience. Management will provide this or seek further support where necessary
  • In any cases with media attention staff will not speak to any media representatives
  • Post-incident risk assessments will be conducted following any incident of this nature to enable the chance of this reoccurring being reduced.

 

Bomb threat/terrorism attack

If a bomb or terrorist attack threat is received at the nursery, the person taking the call will record all details given over the phone as soon as possible, raising the alarm and contacting emergency services as soon as the phone call has ended. The management will follow the fire evacuation procedure and guidance from the emergency services to ensure the safety of all on the premises. The person who took the call will provide as much detail to the emergency services as possible. Ofsted will be notified.

 

With incidents of this nature parents, carers, children and staff may require support and reassurance following the traumatic experience. Management will provide this or seek further support where necessary.

 

Any other significant incidents

All incidents will be managed by the manager on duty and all staff will co-operate with any emergency services on the scene, where applicable. The fire evacuation procedure will be followed for any other incident that requires an emergency evacuation. Other incidents e.g. no water supply, will be dealt with on an individual basis taking into account the effect on the safety, health and welfare of the children and staff in the nursery.

 

If there is an incident outside of the nursery building and it is safer to stay inside the building, we will follow the Lockdown policy. Emergency services advice will be taken.

 

National outbreaks of infection and/or health pandemics

In the event of a national outbreak of a health pandemic, we will follow Government health advice and guidance, legal advice and advice from our insurance provider.

 

The setting will remain open as long as we have sufficient staff to care for the children. Depending on the nature of the pandemic we will follow all advice and implement measures to ensure that risks to vulnerable children and staff are minimised. This may include excluding infected children, staff, parents or family members from the setting for a set period of time, to prevent the spread of infection. This decision will be made in consultation with parents, staff, legal advice and our insurance provider. Each case will be reviewed on an individual basis.

 

The nursery manager will notify Ofsted in the event of a critical incident.

 

 

Data Protection and Confidentiality Policy

At ABC Wonderland  we recognise that we hold sensitive and confidential information about children and their families and the staff we employ. This information is used to meet children’s needs, for registers, invoices and emergency contacts. We store all records in a locked cabinet or on the office computer with files that are password protected in line with data protection principles. Any information shared with the staff team is done on a ‘need to know’ basis and treated in confidence. This policy works alongside the GDPR privacy notice to ensure compliance under General Data Protection Regulation (Regulation (EU) 2016/679 (GDPR) and Data Protection Act 2018.

 

Legal requirements

  • We follow the legal requirements set out in the Statutory Framework for the Early Years Foundation Stage (EYFS) 2021 and accompanying regulations about the information we must hold about registered children and their families and the staff working at the nursery
  • We follow the requirements of the General Data Protection Regulation (Regulation (EU) 2016/679 (GDPR), Data Protection Act 2018 and the Freedom of Information Act 2000 with regard to the storage of data and access to it.

 

Procedures

It is our intention to respect the privacy of children and their families and we do so by:

  • Storing confidential records in a locked filing cabinet or on the office computer with files that are password protected
  • Ensuring staff, student and volunteer inductions include an awareness of the importance of the need to protect the privacy of the children in their care as well as the legal requirements that exist to ensure that information relating to the child is handled in a way that ensures confidentiality. This includes ensuring that information about the child and family is not shared outside of the nursery other than with relevant professionals who need to know that information. It is not shared with friends and family, or part of any social discussions outside of the setting. If staff breach any confidentiality provisions, this may result in disciplinary action and, in serious cases, dismissal. Students on placement in the nursery are advised of our Data protection and confidentiality policy and required to respect it
  • Ensuring that all staff, volunteers and students are aware that information about children and families is confidential and only for use within the nursery and to support the child’s best interests with parental permission
  • Ensuring that parents have access to files and records of their own children but not to those of any other child, other than where relevant professionals such as the police or local authority children’s social care team decide this is not in the child’s best interest
  • Ensuring all staff are aware that this information is confidential and only for use within the nursery setting. If any of this information is requested for whatever reason, the parent’s permission will always be sought other than in the safeguarding circumstances above
  • Ensuring staff do not discuss personal information given by parents with other members of staff, except where it affects planning for the child’s needs
  • Ensuring staff, students and volunteers are aware of and follow our Social networking policy in relation to confidentiality
  • Ensuring issues concerning the employment of staff remain confidential to the people directly involved with making personnel decisions
  • Ensuring any concerns or evidence relating to a child’s personal safety are kept in a secure, confidential file and are shared with as few people as possible on a ‘need-to-know’ basis. If, however, a child is considered at risk, our Safeguarding children and child protection policy will override confidentiality.

 

All the undertakings above are subject to the paramount commitment of the nursery, which is to the safety and well-being of the child.

 

General Data Protection Regulation (Regulation (EU) 2016/679 (GDPR) compliance

In order to meet our requirements under GDPR we will also undertake the following:

  • We will ensure our terms and conditions, privacy and consent notices are easily accessed and made available in accurate and easy to understand language
  • We will use personal data to ensure the safe, operational and regulatory requirements of running our nursery,  We will only make contact in relation to the safe, operational and regulatory requirements of running our nursery. We will not share or use personal data for other purposes. Further detail can be found in the GDPR privacy notice
  • Everyone in our nursery understands that people have the right to access their records or have their records amended or deleted (subject to other laws and regulations)
  • We will ensure staff have due regard to the relevant data protection principles, which allow them to share (and withhold) personal information, as provided for in the Data Protection Act 2018 and the GDPR. This includes:
    • Being confident of the processing conditions which allow them to store and share information for safeguarding purposes, including information which is sensitive and personal, and should be treated as ‘special category personal data’
    • Understanding that ‘safeguarding of children and individuals at risk’ is a processing condition that allows practitioners to share special category personal data. This includes allowing practitioners to share information without consent where there is good reason to do so, and that the sharing of information will enhance the safeguarding of a child in a timely manner, but it is not possible to gain consent, it cannot be reasonably expected that a practitioner gains consent, or if to gain consent would place a child at risk.

Staff and volunteer information

  • All information and records relating to staff and volunteers will be kept confidentially in a locked cabinet
  • Individual staff may request to see their own personal file at any time.

 

Early Learning Opportunities Statement

At ABC Wonderland  we promote the learning and development of all children in our care. We recognise that each child is an individual and our highly qualified staff consider their needs, interests and development to plan a challenging and enjoyable experience across the seven areas of learning and development. Our staff guide and plan what children learn reflecting on the different rates at which they develop and adjust practice appropriately. Our aim is to support all children attending the nursery to attain their maximum potential within their individual capabilities.

 

We provide a positive inclusive play environment for every child, so they develop good social skills and an appreciation of all aspects of this country’s multi-cultural society. We plan learning experiences to ensure, as far as practical, there is equality of opportunity for all children and a celebration of diversity.

 

We maintain a personalised record of every child’s development, showing their abilities, progress, interests and any areas requiring further support.

 

For children whose home language is not English, we will take reasonable steps to:

  • Provide opportunities for children to develop and use their home language in play and learning and support their language development at home; and
  • Ensure that children have sufficient opportunities to learn and reach a good standard in English language during the EYFS, ensuring that children are ready to benefit from the opportunities available to them when they begin year one.

 

We ensure that the educational programmes are well planned and resourced to have depth and breadth across the seven areas of learning. They provide interesting and challenging experiences that meet the needs of all children. Planning is based on a secure knowledge and understanding of how to promote the learning and development of young children and what they can achieve.

 

We implement the Early Years Foundation Stage (EYFS) set by the Department for Education that sets standards to ensure all children learn and develop well. We support and enhance children’s learning and development holistically through play-based activities. We review all aspects of learning and development and ensure a flexible approach is maintained, which responds quickly to children’s learning and developmental needs. We develop tailor-made activities based on observations, which inform future planning and draw on children’s needs and interests. This is promoted through adult-led and child-initiated opportunities both indoors and outdoors.

 

Assessment is an integral part of our practice: we carry out ongoing assessment (formative) through daily observations and ensure that this does not take us away from interacting with the children.

 

Summative assessment is carried out at set points of the year including:

  • Assessment on entry (starting point), including parental contributions. Progress check at age two (where applicable)
  • The Early Years Foundation Stage Profile (where applicable) or any other summative assessment e.g. when children transition to new rooms or leave for school.

 

We acknowledge parents as primary educators and encourage parental involvement as outlined in our Parents as partners policy. We build strong home links in order to enhance and extend children’s learning both within the nursery environment and in the child’s home and have regular meetings with parents to keep them up to date with their child’s progress.

 

We share information about the EYFS curriculum with parents and signpost them to further support via the following website: https://foundationyears.org.uk/

Environmental Sustainability Policy

At ABC Wonderland  we wish to support children to learn about sustainable practices and foster respect and care for the living and non-living environment.

 

Children are able to develop positive attitudes and values about sustainable practices by exploring solutions to environmental issues, learning about the world around them and how to protect it and watching adults role model sustainable practices.

 

We promote a holistic, open-ended curriculum which explores ideas and practices for environmental sustainability and helps children understand the interdependence between people and the environment by:

  • Helping children to explore nature through art and play
  • Supporting children to experience the natural environment through natural materials like wood, stone, sand and recycled materials
  • Supporting the environment by learning how to grow and nurture plants in the nursery garden and discovering all about the food cycle by growing, harvesting and cooking food for our nursery menu
  • Helping children to learn about water conservation, energy efficiency and waste reduction through play-based activities and adult interactions
  • Going on nature walks and learning about plants they see in the local area
  • Encouraging parents and children to regularly walk to nursery to raise the awareness of caring for the planet
  • Developing a recycling area and encouraging children to share a recycling ethos in the home environment.

 

As a nursery we will embed sustainability into all aspects of the operations including:

  • Recycling materials for art and creative activities and encouraging parents to bring in their recycling materials for the same use
  • Ensuring parents recycle children’s take-home recycled material models, if they do not keep them
  • Considering our carbon footprint when purchasing materials
  • Shopping local where possible
  • Turning off equipment and lights when not in use
  • Using energy saving light bulbs
  • Not leaving any equipment on standby
  • Unplugging all equipment at the end of its use/the day
  • Using energy saving wash cycles on the washing machine
  • Hanging washing out to dry and/or using clothes horses rather than tumble dryers where possible
  • Composting food waste
  • Incorporating water-wise strategies such as ensuring taps are turned off and leaks fixed
  • Using potable water rainwater butts for outdoor water play
  • Recycling water from the water play to water plants outside
  • Using food that we have grown in nursery meals.

Working together with all our parents and partners will help our environment to be more sustainable and make it a better place for our future generations to grow up in.

 

We assess our nursery’s impact on the environment on a regular basis and put procedures in place to counteract this impact.

 

In order to encourage children not to waste food or to play with food at mealtimes, we discourage the use of food as a play material; instead, we encourage activities which involve preparing and tasting different types of food.

 

This policy is reviewed annually and is carefully considered in the best interests of the children, nursery and the environment.

 

 

Environmental Sustainability Policy

At ABC Wonderland  we wish to support children to learn about sustainable practices and foster respect and care for the living and non-living environment.

 

Children are able to develop positive attitudes and values about sustainable practices by exploring solutions to environmental issues, learning about the world around them and how to protect it and watching adults role model sustainable practices.

 

We promote a holistic, open-ended curriculum which explores ideas and practices for environmental sustainability and helps children understand the interdependence between people and the environment by:

  • Helping children to explore nature through art and play
  • Supporting children to experience the natural environment through natural materials like wood, stone, sand and recycled materials
  • Supporting the environment by learning how to grow and nurture plants in the nursery garden and discovering all about the food cycle by growing, harvesting and cooking food for our nursery menu
  • Helping children to learn about water conservation, energy efficiency and waste reduction through play-based activities and adult interactions
  • Going on nature walks and learning about plants they see in the local area
  • Encouraging parents and children to regularly walk to nursery to raise the awareness of caring for the planet
  • Developing a recycling area and encouraging children to share a recycling ethos in the home environment.

 

As a nursery we will embed sustainability into all aspects of the operations including:

  • Recycling materials for art and creative activities and encouraging parents to bring in their recycling materials for the same use
  • Ensuring parents recycle children’s take-home recycled material models, if they do not keep them
  • Considering our carbon footprint when purchasing materials
  • Shopping local where possible
  • Turning off equipment and lights when not in use
  • Using energy saving light bulbs
  • Not leaving any equipment on standby
  • Unplugging all equipment at the end of its use/the day
  • Using energy saving wash cycles on the washing machine
  • Hanging washing out to dry and/or using clothes horses rather than tumble dryers where possible
  • Composting food waste
  • Incorporating water-wise strategies such as ensuring taps are turned off and leaks fixed
  • Using potable water rainwater butts for outdoor water play
  • Recycling water from the water play to water plants outside
  • Using food that we have grown in nursery meals.

Working together with all our parents and partners will help our environment to be more sustainable and make it a better place for our future generations to grow up in.

 

We assess our nursery’s impact on the environment on a regular basis and put procedures in place to counteract this impact.

 

In order to encourage children not to waste food or to play with food at mealtimes, we discourage the use of food as a play material; instead, we encourage activities which involve preparing and tasting different types of food.

 

This policy is reviewed annually and is carefully considered in the best interests of the children, nursery and the environment.

 

 

Family Friendly Policy

Maternity rights

This section is for pregnant employees and new mothers. It details their rights, which fall into three main categories:

  • Paid time off for antenatal care
  • Maternity leave
  • Maternity benefits.

 

Ante-natal care

You are entitled to be paid your normal rate of pay for any appointments during working hours related to antenatal care. In order to receive payment an appointment card must be produced confirming the appointment and you will be expected to return to work after keeping your appointment wherever possible. When a certificate confirming pregnancy is issued, this must be handed in as soon as possible.

 

Ordinary maternity leave

You are entitled to 26 weeks’ ordinary maternity leave and have the right to return to work in your previous job. These rights apply regardless of length of service, or the number of hours worked.

 

If you work full time, you have the right to return to your full time position but you do not have the right to return part time. However, your employer will discuss any request for part time work and on request consider offering part time work. Requests should be made in writing to your employer, giving as much notice as possible.

 

You can start your ordinary maternity leave at any time from the 11th week before the expected week of childbirth (EWC) and there is a two-week compulsory maternity leave period following the birth (four weeks for factory workers). For all maternity leave purposes “childbirth” is either a live birth before the end of the 24th week of pregnancy or a live or still birth after the 24th week of pregnancy.

 

Throughout the ordinary maternity leave period, all your terms and conditions of employment are maintained with the sole exception of pay.

 

Additional maternity leave

Additional maternity leave starts at the end of the ordinary maternity leave period and ends 26 weeks later. As with ordinary maternity leave, all your terms and conditions of employment are maintained throughout this period with the sole exception of pay.

 

Notification

The notice periods detailed below must be complied with in order to safeguard your rights.

You must notify your employer in writing by the 15th week before the EWC of the following:

  • That you are pregnant
  • The EWC
  • The date on which you intend to start your maternity leave.

You must also provide a certificate (normally a form MAT B1) stating the EWC. Your employer will then write to you within 28 days to confirm your date of return to work. You can change the date on which you intend to start your maternity leave by giving your employer at least 28 days written notice.

 

Returning to work

If you take the full entitlement to maternity leave your return date will be the date previously notified to you by your employer. If you wish to return early you must give your employer eight weeks’ written notice of your early return date. Your early return may be delayed if this procedure is not followed.

 

If you intend to return to work at the end of your maternity leave but fail to do so, your employer’s normal rules regarding absence will apply.

 

Maternity benefits

Although you do not need any qualifying service or to work a minimum number of hours to be entitled to maternity leave or the right to return to work, in order to qualify for Statutory Maternity Pay (SMP) from your employer, you need to have the following:

  • At least 26 weeks continuous service at the end of the 15th week before the EWC (this is known as the “qualifying week” for maternity pay purposes)
  • Average earnings above the National Insurance lower earnings limit during the eight weeks before the qualifying week.

 

If you meet these conditions, you are entitled to a maximum of 39 weeks SMP which is calculated as:

  • Six weeks at 90% of average weekly earnings
  • 33 weeks at the lesser of the lower rate of SMP or 90% of average weekly earnings.

 

If you do not qualify for SMP you may be entitled to Maternity Allowance (MA).

 

Sickness absence during pregnancy

If you are absent from work because of a pregnancy related illness or reason at any time during the four weeks before your EWC, the ordinary maternity leave period begins on the first day of absence. If the pregnancy related absence began before the fourth week, then the ordinary maternity leave period begins at the start of the fourth week.

 

If you are absent from work and the illness is not pregnancy related, the maternity leave period will begin on the date you have previously notified.

If you are absent from work in the weeks leading up to your maternity leave it may affect the higher rate of SMP (90% of normal pay) because it is based on your average earnings in the eight weeks prior to the qualifying week.

 

Adoption rights

This section is similar to the previous section but deals with employee rights on the adoption of a child, which fall into three main categories:

  • Paid time off to attend pre-adoption appointments

 

  • Adoption leave
  • Adoption benefits.

 

Pre-adoption appointments

If you are the primary or sole adopter and you have been advised that a child is due or expected to be placed with you for adoption you are entitled to be paid your normal rate of pay for up to five pre-adoption appointments during working hours. The appointments must have been made by or at the request of the adoption agency and in order to receive payment an appointment card must be produced confirming each appointment. The maximum time off for each appointment is six and a half hours and you will be expected to return to work after keeping your appointment wherever possible.

 

Ordinary adoption leave

If you are the adoptive parent who has elected to take adoption leave you have the right to 26 weeks’ ordinary adoption leave, which includes two weeks’ compulsory adoption leave. You can start your adoption leave as soon as the child is placed with you for adoption or if pre-notified up to 14 days before that date.

 

You are entitled to return to work in your previous job after the ordinary adoption leave period. If you work full time, you have the right to return to your full time position but you do not have the right to return part time. However, your employer will discuss any request for part time work and on request consider part time work. Requests should be made in writing to your employer, giving as much notice as possible.

 

Throughout the ordinary adoption leave, all your terms and conditions of employment are maintained with the sole exception of pay.

 

Additional adoption leave

If you are entitled to ordinary adoption leave, additional adoption leave starts at the end of the ordinary adoption leave period and ends 26 weeks later. As with ordinary adoption leave, all your terms and conditions of employment are maintained throughout this period with the sole exception of pay.

 

Notification

The notice periods detailed below must be complied with in order to safeguard your rights.

 

You must notify your employer in writing of the following no later than seven days after being matched with a child for adoption:

  • The date of placement of the child for adoption
  • The date on which you intend to start your adoption leave.

 

You must also provide an Adoption Certificate from the approved adoption agency. Your employer will then write to you within 28 days to confirm your date of return to work. You can change the date on which you intend to start your adoption leave by giving your employer at least 28 days’ written notice.

 

Returning to work

If you take the full entitlement to adoption leave your return date will be the date previously notified to you by your employer. If you wish to return early you must give your employer eight weeks’ written notice of your early return date. Your early return may be delayed if this procedure is not followed.

 

If you intend to return to work at the end of your adoption leave but fail to do so, your employer’s normal rules regarding absence will apply.

 

Adoption benefits

Although you do not need any qualifying service or to work a minimum number of hours to be entitled to adoption leave or the right to return to work, in order to qualify for Statutory Adoption Pay (SAP) from your employer, you need to have the following:

  • At least 26 weeks’ continuous service at the end of the week in which the child was matched with you for adoption
  • Average earnings above the National Insurance lower earnings limit during the eight weeks before the week in which the child was matched with you for adoption.

 

If you meet these conditions you are entitled, subject to special rules where the adoption is disrupted or where the child reaches age 18, to a maximum of 39 weeks SAP, calculated as:

  • Six weeks at 90% of average weekly earnings
  • 33 weeks at the lesser of the lower rate of SAP or 90% of average weekly earnings.

 

In order to be paid SAP, you should notify your employer in writing of the following no later than 28 days before the date on which you wish your SAP period to begin:

  • The name and address of the approved adoption agency
  • The date on which the child is expected to be placed for adoption and where the child has already been placed for adoption, the date of placement
  • The date on which you were informed that the child was to be placed with you for adoption.

 

Paternity rights (birth)

Ante-natal appointments

You are entitled to accompany the child’s mother on up to two ante-natal appointments without pay during working hours. This is on condition that you have or expect to have responsibility for the upbringing of the child and that you are the biological father of the child or are married to or are the partner of the child’s mother. The maximum time off for each appointment is six and a half hours and you will be expected to return to work after keeping your appointment wherever possible.

 

Ordinary paternity leave

If you have at least 26 weeks’ continuous service at the end of the 15th week before the EWC, you are entitled to choose to take either one week or two consecutive weeks of ordinary paternity leave if you meet the following conditions:

  • You have or expect to have responsibility for the upbringing of the child
  • You are the biological father of the child or are married to or are the partner of the child’s mother.

You cannot start your ordinary paternity leave until the child is born and it must end within 56 days beginning with the date on which the child is born or the first day of the EWC, whichever is the later. You must give prior notice of the day you intend to start your ordinary paternity leave, which can be:

  • The day on which the child is born
  • A day which you specify as a number of days after the day on which the child is born
  • A pre-determined date, which must be later than the first day of the EWC.

 

Throughout the ordinary paternity leave, all your terms and conditions of employment are maintained with the sole exception of pay.

 

Paternity benefits

If you are entitled to ordinary paternity leave and your average earnings were above the National Insurance lower earnings limit during the eight weeks up to and including the 15th week before the EWC, you are entitled to be paid Statutory Paternity Pay (SPP). SPP is paid during the entire ordinary paternity leave period and is the lesser of:

  • The standard rate of SPP, or
  • 90% of average weekly earnings.

 

Notification

To safeguard your rights to ordinary paternity leave and pay you must complete Form SC3 by the 15th week before the EWC. You can change the date on which you intend to start your ordinary paternity leave by completing a new Form SC3 at least 28 days before the original leave date.

 

Paternity rights (adoption)

Pre-adoption appointments

If you are the primary adopter’s partner and you have been advised that a child is due or expected to be placed with you, you are entitled to attend up to two pre-adoption appointments without pay during working hours. The appointments must have been made by or at the request of the adoption agency and the maximum time off for each appointment is six and a half hours. You will be expected to return to work after keeping your appointment wherever possible.

 

Ordinary paternity leave

If you have at least 26 weeks’ continuous service at the end of the week in which the child’s adopter is matched with the child for a UK adoption, you are entitled to choose to take either one week or two consecutive weeks of ordinary paternity leave if you meet the following conditions:

  • You are not taking adoption leave in respect of the child
  • You have or expect to have responsibility for the upbringing of the child
  • You are married to or are the partner of the child’s adopter.

 

You cannot start your ordinary paternity leave before the day the child is placed with the adopter and it must end within 56 days beginning with the date of placement. You must give prior notice of the day you intend to start your ordinary paternity leave, which can be:

  • The day on which the child is placed with the adopter
  • A day which you specify as a number of days after the day on which the child is placed with the adopter
  • A pre-determined date, which must be later than the date on which the child is expected to be placed for adoption.

 

Throughout the ordinary paternity leave, all your terms and conditions of employment are maintained with the sole exception of pay.

 

Paternity benefits

If you are entitled to ordinary paternity leave and your average earnings were above the National Insurance lower earnings limit during the eight weeks before the week in which the child was matched for adoption, you are entitled to be paid Statutory Paternity Pay (SPP). SPP is paid during the entire ordinary paternity leave period and is the lesser of:

  • The standard rate of SPP, or
  • 90% of average weekly earnings.

 

Notification

To safeguard your rights to ordinary paternity leave and pay you must complete a Form SC4 no later than seven days after the date on which the adopter is notified of having been matched with the child for adoption. You can change the date on which you intend to start your ordinary paternity leave by completing a new Form SC4 at least 28 days before the original leave date.

 

Shared parental rights (birth)

Introduction

Many parents will be able to share leave in the year after their child’s birth and take leave in a more flexible way by stopping and starting their shared parental leave, taking their leave at the same time, and returning to work between periods of leave.

 

To qualify for shared parental leave you must have at least 26 weeks’ continuous service at the end of the 15th week before the EWC and still be in employment the week before you take the shared parental leave. In addition, you must share the main responsibility for the care of the child that the shared parental leave and pay relates to with the other parent and meet an ‘employment and earnings’ test.

 

Opting into shared parental leave and pay

If the mother and her partner agree, the mother can curtail her current maternity leave and ‘convert’ what remains of the leave period into shared parental leave (SPL). The mother must do this by giving formal notice to her employer and, if you are the mother, we have a form that can be completed to provide the required information. At least eight weeks’ notice must be given to curtail maternity leave, at which time the mother and her partner must also give their respective employers an indication of how they intend to take the shared parental leave and pay.

 

The mother’s notice to curtail maternity leave will normally be accompanied by a notice of entitlement to take shared parental leave and a request for a period of shared parental leave and pay. Once notice to curtail maternity leave has been given, it can only be withdrawn in very limited circumstances. However, if the mother gives notice to curtail her maternity leave before the child is born, she has up to six weeks after the birth to change her mind. If the mother revokes her curtailment notice, she remains on maternity leave and can give a new notice to curtail her maternity leave at a later date.

 

Taking shared parental leave

Before you can take shared parental leave and pay you must provide your employer with a notice of your entitlement to shared parental leave and pay, and this must be accompanied by a ‘declaration’ from your partner. This is a ‘one off’ notice and, if you are the mother, you will already have given this notice with your notice to curtail your maternity leave. If you are the mother’s partner we have a form that can be completed to provide the required information. The total number of weeks of SPL available is 52 weeks minus the maternity leave that the mother has already taken (including the compulsory maternity leave period). The leave must be taken in whole weeks (part-weeks count as whole weeks), and it must be taken before the child’s first birthday.

 

All your terms and conditions of employment are maintained throughout the SPL period with the sole exception of pay and, if your combined total of maternity/paternity and SPL does not exceed 26 weeks, you are entitled to return to work in your previous job. If you work full time you have the right to return to your full time position but you do not have the right to return part time. However, your employer will discuss any request for part time work and on request consider part time work. Requests should be made in writing to your employer, giving as much notice as possible.

 

Notification

You are allowed three ‘notifications’ to take a period of SPL. A minimum of eight weeks’ notice must be given before each period of leave, and the mother’s first notice to take SPL will usually be included as part of the notice to curtail maternity leave.

 

If your notice is for a continuous period of SPL, for example six weeks off, it cannot be refused. If, however, your notice is for a discontinuous period of leave, for example six weeks comprising three weeks of SPL, three weeks in work, then three weeks of SPL, this can be refused. The first two weeks of the eight week notice period are to enable you and your employer to discuss this type of request and to try to reach agreement on the pattern of leave.

 

If agreement cannot be reached you have until the 15th day after you submitted your request (i.e. the day after the discussion period expires) to either let the request stand or to withdraw the request. If you let the request stand your employer can insist that the SPL is taken as a period of continuous leave (in the above example as a continuous period of six weeks). You then have five days in which to decide the start date for the period of continuous leave, otherwise it will start on the date of the first period you previously notified. Alternatively, you can withdraw the request and it will not count as one of your three notifications.

 

If you want to change the dates of a previously notified period of SPL and your employer agrees to this, then the change does not count as a formal ‘notification’. If, however, your employer does not agree to the change you can submit a formal notification of the change

 

(giving at least eight weeks’ notice). Your employer will have to accept this notification, but the change will count as one of your three ‘notifications’.

 

Statutory Shared Parental Pay

If you qualified for SMP, MA or SPP you will also qualify for Statutory Shared Parental Pay (SSPP). The total number of weeks of SSPP available is 39 weeks minus the number of weeks of SMP already paid to the mother. SSPP is paid at the lesser of:

  • The standard rate of SSPP, or
  • 90% of average weekly earnings.

 

As there will be more weeks of SPL available than weeks of SSPP, employees who claim SSPP will be required to sign a declaration stating the total pay available and the total pay received.

 

Shared parental rights (adoption)

Introduction

Many parents will be able to share leave in the year after the adoption and take leave in a more flexible way by stopping and starting their shared parental leave, taking their leave at the same time, and returning to work between periods of leave.

 

To qualify for shared parental leave you must have at least 26 weeks’ continuous service at the end of the week in which the adopter is notified of having been matched with a child for adoption and still be in employment the week before you take the shared parental leave. In addition, you must share the main responsibility for the care of the child that the shared parental leave and pay relates to with the other parent and meet an ‘employment and earnings test’.

 

Opting into shared parental leave and pay

If the primary adopter and their partner agree, the primary adopter can curtail their current adoption leave and ‘convert’ what remains of the leave period into shared parental leave (SPL). The primary adopter must do this by giving formal notice to the employer and if you are the primary adopter, we have a form that can be completed to provide the required information. At least eight weeks’ notice must be given to curtail adoption leave, at which time the primary adopter and their partner must also give their respective employers an indication of how they intend to take the shared parental leave and pay.

 

The primary adopter’s notice to curtail adoption leave will normally be accompanied by a notice of entitlement to take shared parental leave and a request for a period of shared parental leave and pay. Once notice to curtail adoption leave has been given, it can only be withdrawn in very limited circumstances.

 

Taking shared parental leave

Before you can take shared parental leave and pay you must provide your employer with a notice of your entitlement to shared parental leave and pay, and this must be accompanied by a ‘declaration’ from your partner. This is a ‘one off’ notice and, if you are the primary adopter, you will already have given this notice with your notice to curtail your adoption leave. If you are the secondary adopter/adopter’s partner we have a form that can be completed to provide the required information. The total number of weeks of SPL available is 52 weeks minus the adoption leave that the primary adopter has already taken (including the compulsory adoption leave period). The leave must be taken in whole weeks (part-weeks count as whole weeks), and it must be taken during the first year following the adoption.

 

All your terms and conditions of employment are maintained throughout the SPL period with the sole exception of pay and if your combined total of adoption/paternity and SPL does not exceed 26 weeks, you are entitled to return to work in your previous job. If you work full time you have the right to return to your full time position but you do not have the right to return part time. However, your employer will discuss any request for part time work and will, on request consider part time work. Requests should be made in writing to your employer, giving as much notice as possible.

 

Notification

You are allowed three ‘notifications’ to take a period of SPL. A minimum of eight weeks’ notice must be given before each period of leave, and the primary adopter’s first notice to take SPL will usually be included as part of the notice to curtail adoption leave.

 

If your notice is for a continuous period of SPL, for example six weeks off, it cannot be refused. If however, your notice is for a discontinuous period of leave, for example six weeks comprising three weeks of SPL, three weeks in work, then three weeks of SPL, this can be refused. The first two weeks of the eight week notice period are to enable you and your employer to discuss this type of request and to try to reach agreement on the pattern of leave.

 

If agreement cannot be reached you have until the 15th day after you submitted your request (i.e. the day after the discussion period expires) to either let the request stand or to withdraw the request. If you let the request stand your employer can insist that the SPL is taken as a period of continuous leave (in the above example as a continuous period of six weeks). You then have five days in which to decide the start date for the period of continuous leave, otherwise it will start on the date of the first period you previously notified. Alternatively, you can withdraw the request and it will not count as one of your three notifications.

 

If you want to change the dates of a previously notified period of SPL and your employer agrees to this, then the change does not count as a formal ‘notification’. If, however, your employer does not agree to the change you can submit a formal notification of the change (giving at least eight weeks’ notice). Your employer will have to accept this notification, but the change will count as one of your three ‘notifications’.

 

Statutory Shared Parental Pay

If you qualified for SAP or SPP you will also qualify for Statutory Shared Parental Pay (SSPP). The total number of weeks of SSPP available is 39 weeks minus the number of weeks of SAP already paid to the primary adopter. SSPP is paid at the lesser of:

  • The standard rate of SSPP, or
  • 90% of average weekly earnings.

 

As there will be more weeks of SPL available than weeks of SSPP, employees who claim SSPP will be required to sign a declaration stating the total pay available and the total pay received.

 

Parental leave

Parents of children born or placed for adoption are entitled, on completion of one year’s service with the nursery, to take unpaid parental leave. The right applies to mothers and fathers and to a person who has legal parental responsibility. Parents who already have at least one year’s service are able to start taking parental leave when the child is born or adopted and the remainder are able to start taking parental leave as soon as they have completed one year’s service.

 

Parents are entitled to 18 weeks’ leave for each child, to be taken before the child reaches age 18. Parents must give 21 days’ written notice to take parental leave and it must be taken in blocks or multiples of one week (part-weeks, including single days or part days, count as whole weeks) up to a maximum of four weeks in any one year. Parents of disabled children for whom a disability living allowance has been awarded have the additional flexibility to take leave in days without them being counted as whole weeks, although part days count as full days.

 

Leave can be postponed by the nursery for up to six months where the business cannot cope, except when a father gives the above advance notice to take leave immediately after the date when the child is born or when the partner of a primary adopter gives the above advance notice to take leave immediately after the date when the child is placed for adoption.

 

Time off for dependants

You will be allowed to take reasonable time off work without pay to deal with an emergency involving a dependant. The amount of time off allowed will depend on the circumstances.

 

For example, if a dependant is ill or injured, reasonable time off will be given to deal with the emergency – this does not mean that you will be allowed to take time off to look after the dependant personally.

 

Compassionate leave

This leave applies on the death of an employee’s spouse, life partner, parent, brother, sister, grandparent, dependent or other relative for whom the employee has special responsibility or has had special ties.

 

Generally, the amount of time off required will be at the manager’s or senior management team’s discretion and will depend on individual circumstances but up to 37 hours (the equivalent of one working week) paid leave would be considered.

 

Death of a child

If an employee experiences the death of a child under the age of 18 or suffers a stillbirth from 24 weeks of pregnancy, the employee will be entitled to two weeks’ paid leave, subject to meeting the eligibility criteria having been employed for at least 26 weeks.  Support will be given including making reasonable adjustments on the return to work and further ongoing support as required.

Fire Safety Policy

At ABC Wonderland  we take reasonable steps to ensure the safety of children, staff and others on the nursery premises in the case of a fire or other emergency through our Fire safety policy and emergency evacuation procedures.

 

The manager and designated fire marshal is Alex Ataide.

 

We ensure the nursery premises are compliant with fire safety regulations, including following any major changes or alterations to the premises. The *manager fire marshal ensures all the appropriate fire detection and control equipment (e.g. fire alarms, smoke detectors, fire blankets and/or fire extinguishers) is in working order and seeks advice from the local fire safety officer as necessary.

 

They also have overall responsibility for the fire drill and emergency evacuation procedures. These are carried out and recorded for each group of children every three months or as and when a large change occurs e.g. a large intake of children or a new member of staff joins the nursery. These drills are planned to occur at different times of the day and on different days to ensure evacuations are possible under different circumstances and all children and staff participate in the rehearsals.

 

All staff receive fire safety and evacuation training (including as part of induction) to help them understand their roles and responsibilities. This includes the steps they must take to ensure the safety of children, for example keeping fire doors free from obstruction, how to safely evacuate the children and where the evacuation meeting point is situated. Each room has a specific evacuation plan, which includes information such as evacuating non-mobile babies and using alternative exits depending on where the fire may be situated.

 

The *manager fire marshal checks fire detection and control equipment and fire exits in line with the timescales within the checklist below.

 

Fire checklist

Who checksHow oftenLocation
Escape route/fire exits (all fire exits must be clearly identifiable)Manager3monthsFront and back of the nursery
Emergency lightingManager3mFront and back doors
Fire extinguishers and blanketsManager3mDinning room, kitchen and lobby
Smoke and/or heat alarmsManagerEverymonthDinning room
Fire alarmsManager3mFront and back of the nursery
Fire doors closed, in good repair, doors free of obstruction and easily opened from the insideManager3mFront and back doors easy access

 

A deputy fire marshal is appointed to over this role when the fire marshal is absent.

 

Registration

An accurate record of all staff and children present in the building must be kept at all times with children and staff marked in and out on arrival and departure. An accurate record of visitors is kept in the visitor’s book. These records are taken out along with the register and emergency contacts list in the event of a fire.

 

No smoking/vaping policy

The nursery operates a strict no smoking/vaping policy – please see this separate policy for details.

 

Fire drill procedure

On discovering a fire:

  • Calmly raise the alarm by ringing the bell
  • Immediately evacuate the building under guidance from the *manager on duty (collecting children’s room registers, where applicable)
  • Using the nearest accessible exit lead the children out, assemble at front the nursery at the roundabout and back of the nursery at the kings coffee shop
  • Close all doors and windows behind you wherever possible
  • All walking children follow the key persons to meeting points and listen carefully and stay with the adult till is ok to be back in
  • Baby rooms key persons pick up the babies and leave to go the metting point
  • Do not stop to collect personal belongings on evacuating the building
  • Do not attempt to go back in and fight the fire
  • Do not attempt to go back in if any children or adults are not accounted for
  • Wait for emergency services and report any unaccounted persons to the fire service and/or police.

 

If you are unable to evacuate safely:

  • Stay where you are safe
  • Keep the children calm and together
  • Wherever possible alert the manager of your location and the identity of the children and other adults with you.

The *manager and team leader is to:

  • Collect the central children’s register, where applicable, staff register, nursery mobile/phone, keys, visitor book and fire bag (containing emergency contacts list, nappies, wipes and blankets, etc.)
  • Telephone emergency services: dial 999 and ask for the fire service
  • In the fire assembly point area –front nursery is near to the roundabout back nursery on Kings coffee shop– check the children against the register
  • Account for all adults: staff and visitors
  • Advise the fire service of anyone missing and possible locations and respond to any other questions they may have.

 

Remember

  • Do not stop to collect personal belongings on evacuating the building
  • Do not attempt to go back in and fight the fire
  • Do not attempt to go back in if any children or adults are not accounted for.

 

This policy is updated at least annually in consultation with staff and/or after a fire evacuation practice and/or fire.

 

 

GDPR Privacy Notice

What is the purpose of this document?

ABC Wonderland   (“the nursery” or “we”) is committed to protecting the privacy and security of your personal information.

 

This privacy notice describes how the nursery collects and uses personal information about employees of the nursery (“employees”), children attending the nursery (“child” or “children”) and the parents of the children (“parents”) (known collectively as “you” or “your”), in accordance with the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR).

 

The nursery ABC Wonderland  is a “data controller”. This means that we are responsible for deciding how we hold and use personal information about you. We are required under data protection legislation to notify you of the information contained in this privacy notice.

 

This notice applies to employees, children and parents. This notice does not form part of any contract of employment or other contract to provide services. We may update this notice at any time but if we do so, we will provide you with an updated copy of this notice as soon as reasonably practical.

 

It is important that employees, children and parents read and retain this notice, together with any other privacy notice we may provide on specific occasions when we are collecting or processing personal information about you, so that you are aware of how and why we are using such information and what your rights are under the data protection legislation.

 

Data protection principles

We will comply with data protection law. This says that the personal information we hold about you must be:

  • Used lawfully, fairly and in a transparent way
  • Collected only for valid purposes that we have clearly explained to you and not used in any way that is incompatible with those purposes
  • Relevant to the purposes we have told you about and limited only to those purposes
  • Accurate and kept up to date
  • Kept only as long as necessary for the purposes we have told you about
  • Kept securely.

 

The kind of information we hold about you

Personal data, or personal information, means any information about an individual from which that person can be identified. It does not include data where the identity has been removed (anonymous data).

 

There are “special categories” of more sensitive personal data which require a higher level of protection, such as information about a person’s health or sexual orientation.

 

 

 

Employees

We will collect, store, and use the following categories of personal information about employees:

  • Personal contact details such as name, title, addresses, telephone numbers, and personal email addresses
  • Date of birth
  • Gender
  • Marital status and dependants
  • Next of kin and emergency contact information
  • National Insurance number
  • Bank account details, payroll records and tax status information
  • Salary, annual leave, pension and benefits information
  • Start date and, if different, the date of an employee’s continuous employment
  • Location of employment or workplace
  • Copy of driving licence (where applicable)
  • Recruitment information (including copies of right to work documentation, references and other information included in a CV or cover letter or as part of the application process)
  • Employment records (including job titles, work history, working hours, holidays, training records and professional memberships)
  • Personnel files and training records including performance information, disciplinary and grievance information, and working time records
  • Information about your use of our information and communications systems
  • Records of any reportable death, injury, disease or dangerous occurrence.

 

We may also collect, store and use the following “special categories” of more sensitive personal information:

  • Information about an employee’s race or ethnicity
  • Information about an employee’s health, including any medical condition, accident, health and sickness records, including:
    • Where an employee leaves employment and under any share plan operated by a group company the reason for leaving is determined to be ill-health, injury or disability, the records relating to that decision
    • Details of any absences (other than holidays) from work including time on statutory parental leave and sick leave, and
    • Where an employee leaves employment and the reason for leaving is related to their health, information about that condition needed for pensions and permanent health insurance purposes.

 

Children

We will collect, store, and use the following categories of personal information about children:

  • Name
  • Date of birth
  • Home address
  • Dietary requirements
  • Attendance information
  • Photographs and video clips of the child to signpost children to where their belongings are stored at the nursery that they attend, and also for general display purposes
  • Emergency contact should parents be unavailable and the emergency contact’s contact details
  • Record book for each child containing the work of the child whilst at the nursery, observations about the child’s development whilst at the nursery from employees of the nursery, specific examples of the child’s progress, photographs demonstrating the child’s development whilst at the nursery, and personal details of the child (e.g. their date of birth) (“progress report”)
  • Records relating to individual children e.g. care plans, common assessment frameworks, speech and language referral forms
  • Accidents and pre-existing injuries forms
  • Records of any reportable death, injury, disease or dangerous occurrence
  • Observation, planning and assessment records of children

 

We may also collect, store and use the following “special categories” of more sensitive personal information:

  • Information about a child’s race or ethnicity, spoken language and nationality
  • Information about a child’s health, including any medical condition, health and sickness records
  • Information about a child’s accident or incident reports including reports of pre-existing injuries
  • Information about a child’s incident forms, child protection referral forms and child protection case details and/or reports.

 

Parents

We will collect, store, and use the following categories of personal information about parents:

  • Name
  • Home address
  • Telephone numbers, and personal email addresses
  • National Insurance number
  • Bank account details.

 

We may also collect, store and use the following “special categories” of more sensitive personal information:

  • Information about a parent’s race or ethnicity, spoken language and nationality
  • Conversations with parents where employees of the nursery deem it relevant to the prevention of radicalisation or other aspects of the governments Prevent strategy.

 

How is your personal information collected?

 

Employees

We collect personal information about employees through the application and recruitment process, either directly from candidates or sometimes from an employment agency or background check provider. We may sometimes collect additional information from third parties including former employers, credit reference agencies or other background check agencies.

 

We will collect additional personal information in the course of job-related activities throughout the period of when an employee works for us.

 

Children and parents

We collect personal information about children and parents from when the initial enquiry is made by the parents, through the enrolment process and until the children stop using the nursery’s services.

 

How we will use information about you

We will only use your personal information when the law allows us to. Most commonly, we will use your personal information in the following circumstances:

  • Where we need to perform the contract we have entered into with you
  • Where we need to comply with a legal obligation
  • Where it is necessary for our legitimate interests (or those of a third party) and your interests and fundamental rights do not override those interests.

 

We may also use your personal information in the following situations, which are likely to be rare:

  • Where we need to protect your interests (or someone else’s interests).

 

Situations in which we will use employee personal information

We need all the categories of information in the list above (see employee section within the paragraph entitled ‘The kind of information we hold about you’) primarily to allow us to perform our contracts with employees and to enable us to comply with legal obligations. The situations in which we will process employee personal information are listed below.

 

  • Making a decision about an employee’s recruitment or appointment
  • Checking an employee is legally entitled to work in the UK. Paying an employee and, if an employee is an employee or deemed employee for tax purposes, deducting tax and National Insurance contributions (NICs)
  • Providing any employee benefits to employees
  • Enrolling you in a pension arrangement in accordance with our statutory automatic enrolment duties
  • Liaising with the trustees or managers of a pension arrangement operated by a group company, your pension provider and any other provider of employee benefits
  • Administering the contract we have entered into with an employee

 

  • Conducting performance and/or salary reviews, managing performance and determining performance requirements
  • Assessing qualifications for a particular job or task, including decisions about promotions
  • Gathering evidence for possible grievance or disciplinary hearings
  • Making decisions about an employee’s continued employment and engagement
  • Making arrangements for the termination of our working relationship
  • Education, training and development requirements
  • Dealing with legal disputes involving employees, including accidents at work
  • Ascertaining an employee’s fitness to work
  • Managing sickness absence
  • Complying with health and safety obligations
  • To prevent fraud
  • To monitor your use of our information and communication systems to ensure compliance with our IT policies
  • To ensure network and information security, including preventing unauthorised access to our computer and electronic communications systems and preventing malicious software distribution
  • Equal opportunities monitoring.

 

Some of the above grounds for processing will overlap and there may be several grounds which justify our use of an employee’s personal information.

Situations in which the nursery will use personal information of children

We need all the categories of information in the list above (see children section within the paragraph entitled ‘The kind of information we hold about you’) primarily to allow us to perform our obligations (including our legal obligations to children). The situations in which we will process personal information of children are listed below.

 

  • Upon consent from the parents, personal data of children will be shared with schools for progression into the next stage of their education
  • Personal information of children will be shared with local authorities without the consent of parents where there is a situation where child protection is necessary
  • The personal information of children will be shared with local authorities without the consent of parents for funding purposes
  • Ofsted will be allowed access to the nursery’s systems to review child protection records
  • To ensure we meet the needs of the children
  • To enable the appropriate funding to be received
  • Report on a child’s progress whilst with the nursery
  • To check safeguarding records
  • To check complaint records
  • To check attendance patterns are recorded
  • When a child’s progress report is given to his/her parent in order for that parent to pass the same progress report to a school for application or enrolment purposes.

 

Situations in which the nursery will use personal information of parents

We need all the categories of information in the list above (see parents section within the paragraph entitled ‘The kind of information we hold about you’) primarily to allow us to perform our contracts with parents and to enable us to comply with legal obligations. The situations in which we will process personal information of parents are listed below.

 

  • The personal information of parents will be shared with local authorities without the consent of parents for funding purposes
  • To report on a child’s attendance
  • To be able to contact a parent or a child’s emergency contact about their child
  • To ensure nursery fees are paid.

 

If employees and parents fail to provide personal information

If employees and parents fail to provide certain information when requested, we may not be able to perform the respective contracts we have entered into with employees and parents, or we may be prevented from complying with our respective legal obligations to employees, children and parents.

 

Change of purpose

We will only use your personal information for the purposes for which we collected it, unless we reasonably consider that we need to use it for another reason and that reason is compatible with the original purpose. If we need to use your personal information for an unrelated purpose, we will notify the employee, child or parent, as is appropriate in the circumstances, and we will explain the legal basis which allows us to do so.

 

Please note that we may process an employee’s, a child’s or a parent’s personal information without their respective knowledge or consent, as relevant to the circumstances, in compliance with the above rules, where this is required or permitted by law.

 

How we use particularly sensitive personal information

“Special categories” of particularly sensitive personal information require higher levels of protection. We need to have further justification for collecting, storing and using this type of personal information. We have in place an appropriate policy document and safeguards which we are required by law to maintain when processing such data. We may process special categories of personal information in the following circumstances:

  • In limited circumstances, with employee or parent explicit written consent
  • Where we need to carry out our legal obligations or exercise rights in connection with employee employment
  • Where it is needed in the public interest, such as for equal opportunities monitoring or in relation to our occupational pension scheme.

 

Less commonly, we may process this type of information where it is needed in relation to legal claims or where it is needed to protect an employee, a child or a parents’ interests (or someone else’s interests) and the employee, child or parent as is appropriate is not capable of giving consent, or where the employee or parent has already made the information public.

 

The nursery’s obligations as an employer

We will use particularly sensitive personal information of employees in the following ways:

  • We will use information relating to leaves of absence, which may include sickness absence or family related leaves, to comply with employment and other laws
  • We will use information about the physical or mental health of an employee, or their disability status, to ensure employee health and safety in the workplace and to assess the fitness of employees to work, to provide appropriate workplace adjustments, to monitor and manage sickness absence and to administer benefits including statutory maternity pay, statutory sick pay, pensions and permanent health insurance
  • We will use information about an employee’s race or national or ethnic origin, religious, philosophical or moral beliefs, or an employee’s sexual life or sexual orientation, to ensure meaningful equal opportunity monitoring and reporting.

 

Do we need employee consent?

We do not need the consent of employees if we use special categories of personal information in accordance with our written policy to carry out our legal obligations or exercise specific rights in the field of employment law.

 

In limited circumstances, we may approach employees for their written consent to allow us to process certain particularly sensitive data. If we do so, we will provide employees with full details of the information that we would like and the reason we need it, so that employees can carefully consider whether they wish to consent. Employees should be aware that it is not a condition of their contract with the nursery that they agree to any request for consent from us.

 

Information about criminal convictions

We may only use information relating to criminal convictions where the law allows us to do so. This will usually be where such processing is necessary to carry out our obligations and provided we do so in line with our Data protection and confidentiality policy.

 

Less commonly, we may use information relating to criminal convictions where it is necessary in relation to legal claims, where it is necessary to protect the interests of you (or someone else’s interests) and you are not capable of giving your consent, or where an employee or a parent, as is relevant to the circumstances, has already made the information public.

 

We envisage that we will hold information about criminal convictions.

 

We will only collect information about criminal convictions if it is appropriate given the nature of the role and where we are legally able to do so, which includes but is not limited to Disclosure and Barring Service (“DBS”) checks. Where appropriate, we will collect information about criminal convictions as part of the recruitment process or we may be notified of such information directly by you in the course of you working for us. We will use information about criminal convictions and offences in the following ways:

  • To conduct a DBS check on each employee, to record the date of the DBS check, the number of the DBS check and the name of the body conducting the DBS check.

 

We are allowed to use your personal information in this way to carry out our obligations.

We have in place an appropriate policy and safeguards which we are required by law to maintain when processing such data.

 

Automated decision-making

Automated decision-making takes place when an electronic system uses personal information to make a decision without human intervention. We are allowed to use automated decision-making in the following circumstances:

  • Where we have notified employees or parents of the decision and given the employee or the parent as is appropriate 21 days to request a reconsideration
  • Where it is necessary to perform the contract with an employee or a parent and appropriate measures are in place to safeguard the employee’s, the child’s or the parent’s rights as is appropriate
  • In limited circumstances, with explicit written consent from the employee or the parent, as is appropriate, and where appropriate measures are in place to safeguard employee or parent rights.

 

If we make an automated decision on the basis of any particularly sensitive personal information, we must have either explicit written consent from an employee or a parent as is appropriate, or it must be justified in the public interest, and we must also put in place appropriate measures to safeguard an employee’s or a parent’s rights as is relevant in the circumstances.

 

You will not be subject to decisions that will have a significant impact on you based solely on automated decision-making, unless we have a lawful basis for doing so and we have notified the employee or the parent as is appropriate in the circumstances.

 

Data sharing

We may have to share employee, child or parent data with third parties, including third-party service providers and other entities in the group.

 

We require third parties to respect the security of your data and to treat it in accordance with the law.

 

Why might the nursery share employee, child or parent personal information with third parties?

We will share your personal information with third parties where required by law, where it is necessary to administer the working relationship with you or where we have another legitimate interest in doing so.

 

Which third-party service providers process my personal information?

“Third parties” includes third-party service providers (including contractors and designated agents), local authorities, regulatory bodies, schools and other entities within our group. The following third-party service providers process personal information about you for the following purposes:

  • Local Authorities – for funding and monitoring reasons (e.g. equal opportunities and uptake of funded hours)

 

  • Regulatory bodies – for ensuring compliance and the safety and welfare of the children
  • Schools – to provide a successful transition by ensuring information about the child’s progress and current level of development and interests are shared.

 

We will share personal data regarding your participation in any pension arrangement operated by a group company with the trustees or scheme managers of the arrangement in connection with the administration of the arrangements.

 

How secure is my information with third-party service providers and other entities in our group?

All our third-party service providers and other entities in the group are required to take appropriate security measures to protect your personal information in line with our policies. We do not allow our third-party service providers to use your personal data for their own purposes. We only permit them to process your personal data for specified purposes and in accordance with our instructions.

 

When might you share my personal information with other entities in the group?

We will share your personal information with other entities in our group as part of our [DESCRIBE OTHER KNOWN ACTIVITIES].

 

What about other third parties?

We may share your personal information with other third parties, for example in the context of the possible sale or restructuring of the business. In this situation we will, as far as possible, share anonymised data with the other parties before the transaction completes. Once the transaction is completed, we will share your personal data with the other parties, if and to the extent required, under the terms of the transaction.

 

We may also need to share your personal information with a regulator or to otherwise comply with the law.

 

Data retention

 

How long will you use my information for?

We will only retain your personal information for as long as necessary to fulfil the purposes we collected it for, including for the purposes of satisfying any legal, accounting, or reporting requirements. Details of retention periods for different aspects of your personal information are available in our retention policy which is available from the manager. To determine the appropriate retention period for personal data, we consider the amount, nature, and sensitivity of the personal data, the potential risk of harm from unauthorised use or disclosure of your personal data, the purposes for which we process your personal data and whether we can achieve those purposes through other means, and the applicable legal requirements.

 

In some circumstances we may anonymise your personal information so that it can no longer be associated with you, in which case we may use such information without further notice to you.

 

Once you are no longer an employee, or a child benefiting from the nursery’s services or a parent, as is appropriate, we will retain and securely destroy your personal information in accordance with [our data retention policy OR applicable laws and regulations].

 

Rights of access, correction, erasure, and restriction

Your duty to inform us of changes

It is important that the personal information we hold about you is accurate and current. Please keep us informed if your personal information changes during your working relationship with us.

 

Your rights in connection with personal information

Under certain circumstances, by law you have the right to:

  • Request access to your personal information (commonly known as a “data subject access request”). This enables you to receive a copy of the personal information we hold about you and to check that we are lawfully processing it
  • Request correction of the personal information that we hold about you. This enables you to have any incomplete or inaccurate information we hold about you corrected
  • Request erasure of your personal information. This enables employees or parents to ask us to delete or remove personal information where there is no good reason for us continuing to process it. You also have the right to ask us to delete or remove your personal information where you have exercised your right to object to processing (see below)
  • Object to processing of your personal information where we are relying on a legitimate interest (or those of a third party) and there is something about your particular situation which makes you want to object to processing on this ground. You also have the right to object where we are processing your personal information for direct marketing purposes
  • Request the restriction of processing of your personal information. This enables employees or parents, as is appropriate, to ask us to suspend the processing of personal information about you for example if you want us to establish its accuracy or the reason for processing it
  • Request the transfer of your personal information to another party.

If you want to review, verify, correct or request erasure of your personal information, object to the processing of your personal data, or request that we transfer a copy of your personal information to another party, please contact the manager in writing.

 

No fee usually required

You will not have to pay a fee to access your personal information (or to exercise any of the other rights).

 

What we may need from you

We may need to request specific information from you to help us confirm your identity and ensure your right to access the information (or to exercise any of your other rights).

 

This is another appropriate security measure to ensure that personal information is not disclosed to any person who has no right to receive it.

 

Right to withdraw consent

In the limited circumstances where you may have provided your consent to the collection, processing and transfer of your personal information for a specific purpose, you have the right to withdraw your consent for that specific processing at any time. To withdraw your consent, please contact [the manager]. Once we have received notification that you have withdrawn your consent, we will no longer process your information for the purpose or purposes you originally agreed to, unless we have another legitimate basis for doing so in law.

 

Changes to this privacy notice

We reserve the right to update this privacy notice at any time, and we will provide you with a new privacy notice when we make any substantial updates. We may also notify you in other ways from time to time about the processing of your personal information.

 

If you have any questions about this privacy notice, please contact Alex Ataide on 07972913375 or on abcwonderland.2009@gmail.com

Health and Safety – General Policy

At ABC Wonderland  we provide and maintain safe and healthy working conditions, equipment and systems of work for all our employees and a safe early learning environment in which children learn and are cared for. To develop and promote a strong health and safety culture within the nursery for the benefit of all staff, children, parents and any visitors, we provide information, training and supervision. We also accept our responsibility for the health and safety of other people who may be affected by our activities.

 

The allocation of duties for safety matters and the particular arrangements which we will make to implement our health and safety procedures are set out within this policy and we make sufficient resources available to provide a safe environment.

 

Legal framework

We follow all relevant legislation and associated guidance relating to health and safety within the nursery including:

  • The requirements of the Early Years Foundation Stage (EYFS) Statutory Framework (2021)
  • The regulations of the Health and Safety at Work Act (1974) and any other relevant legislation such as Control of Substances Hazardous to Health Regulation (COSHH)
  • Any guidance provided by UK Health Security Agency, the local health protection unit, the local authority environmental health department, fire authority or the Health and Safety Executive.

 

Aims and objectives

The aim of this policy statement is to ensure that all reasonably practical steps are taken to ensure the health, safety and welfare of all persons using the premises.

 

To achieve this, we will actively work towards the following objectives:

  • Establish and maintain a safe and healthy environment throughout the nursery including outdoor spaces
  • Establish and maintain safe working practices amongst staff and children
  • Make arrangements for ensuring safety and the minimising of risks to health in connection with the use, handling, storage and transport of hazardous articles and substances
  • Ensure the provision of sufficient information, instruction and supervision to enable all people working in or using the nursery to avoid hazards and contribute positively to their own health and safety and to ensure that staff have access to regular health and safety training
  • Maintain a healthy and safe nursery with safe entry and exit routes
  • Formulate effective procedures for use in case of fire and other emergencies and for evacuating the nursery premises. Practice this procedure on a regular basis to enable the safe and speedy evacuation of the nursery
  • Maintain a safe working environment for pregnant workers or for workers who have recently given birth, including undertaking appropriate risk assessments
  • Maintain a safe environment for those with special educational needs and disabilities and ensure all areas of the nursery are accessible (wherever practicable)
  • Provide a safe environment for students or trainees to learn in
  • Encourage all staff, visitors and parents to report any unsafe working practices or areas to ensure immediate response by the management.

 

We believe the risks in the nursery environment are low.  To maintain the maximum protection for children, staff and parents the nursery:

  • Ensures all entrances and exits from the building, including fire exits are clearly identifiable, free from obstruction and easily opened from the inside
  • Regularly check the premises room by room for structural defects, worn fixtures and fittings or electrical equipment and take the necessary remedial action
  • Ensures that all staff, visitors, parents and children are aware of the fire procedures and regular fire drills are carried out
  • Has the appropriate fire detection and control equipment which is checked regularly to make sure it is in working order
  • Ensures that all members of staff are aware of the procedure to follow in case of accidents for staff, visitors and children
  • Ensures that all members of staff take all reasonable action to control the spread of infectious diseases and wear protective gloves and clothing where appropriate
  • Ensures there are suitable hygienic changing facilities (see Infection control policy)
  • Prohibits smoking or vaping on the nursery premises
  • Prohibits any contractor from working on the premises without prior discussion with the officer in charge
  • Encourages children to manage risks safely and prohibits running inside the premises unless in designated areas
  • Risk assesses all electrical sockets and take appropriate measures to reduce risks where necessary and ensure no trailing wires are left around the nursery
  • Ensures all cleaning materials are placed out of the reach of children and kept in their original containers
  • Ensures staff wear protective clothing when cooking or serving food
  • Prohibits certain foods that may relate to children’s allergies, e.g. nuts are not allowed in the nursery
  • Follows the EU Food Information for Food Consumers Regulations (EU FIC) by identifying the 14 allergens listed by EU Law that we use as ingredients in any of the dishes we provide to children and ensure that all parents are informed
  • Follows the allergies and allergic reactions policy for children who have allergies or have a reaction at the nursery
  • Ensures risk assessments are undertaken on the storage and preparation of food produce within the nursery
  • Familiarises all staff and visitors with the position of the first aid boxes and ensure all know who the appointed first aiders are
  • Provides appropriately stocked first aid boxes and check their contents regularly
  • Ensures children are supervised at all times
  • Takes all reasonable steps to prevent unauthorised persons entering the premises and have an agreed procedure for checking the identity of visitors
  • Ensures no student or volunteer is left unsupervised at any time
  • Ensures staff paediatric first aid certificates or a list of staff who hold a current PFA certificate are on display (and/or made available to parents).

 

Responsibilities

The designated Health and Safety Officer in the nursery is Alex Ataide.

 

The employer has overall and final responsibility for this policy being carried out at:

ABC WONDERLAND LTD,
UNIT 5, K-LINE MASTERLORD VILLAGE, WEST ROAD
IP3 9FG – IPSWICH
07972913375
ABCWONDERLAND.2009@GMAIL.COM
WEBSITE:
WWW.ABCWONDERLAND.CO.UK
OFSTED REG. – 2619289

 

The nursery deputy nursery manager will be responsible in his/her absence.

 

All employees have the responsibility to cooperate with senior staff and the manager to achieve a healthy and safe nursery and to take reasonable care of themselves and others. Neglect of health and safety regulations and duties will be regarded as a disciplinary matter (see separate Disciplinary procedure).

 

Whenever a member of staff notices a health or safety issue or problem which they are not able to rectify, they must immediately report it to the appropriate person named above. Parents and visitors are requested to report any concerns they may have to the *senior member of staff in the area/*deputy manager/*manager.

 

Daily contact, monthly staff meetings and health and safety meetings provide consultation between management and employees. These include health and safety matters.

 

Health and safety training

Person responsible for monitoring staff training is [Alex Ataide ].

 

Health and safety is covered in all induction training for new staff.

Training table (example):

AreaTraining requiredWho
Paediatric First AidCourseAll staff
Dealing with bloodIn house training/courseAll staff and students
Safeguarding children and child protectionIn house training/courseAll staff and students
Care of babiesIn house training/courseAt least half of the staff working with under twos
Risk assessmentsIn house training/courseAll staff
Fire safety proceduresIn house trainingAll staff and students
Use of fire extinguisherIn house training/courseAll staff where possible
Food hygieneIn house training/courseAnyone involved in preparing and handling food
Allergy awarenessIn house training/courseAll staff and students
Manual handlingIn house training/courseAll staff and students
Stress awareness and managementIn house training/courseAll staff
Changing of nappiesIn house trainingAll staff
Fire marshal dutiesExternal courseFire marshal
Medication requiring technical or medical knowledge, Epi PenExternal courseAs required
SENCoExternal courseSENCo
Supervision and appraisalExternal courseManager, deputy and room supervisors

 

At least one member of staff on the premises and available at times when children are present MUST hold a full paediatric first aid (PFA) certificate in the nursery and must accompany children on outings. The certificate must be for a full course consistent with the criteria set out in Annex A of the EYFS (2021). The 12 hour full PFA must be a full course and delivered consistent with the criteria set out in Annex A of the EYFS.

 

This must be renewed every three years.

In addition to this, all newly qualified entrants to the early years workforce who have completed a level 2 and/or level 3 qualification on or after 30 June 2016, must also have either a full PFA or an emergency PFA certificate within three months of starting work and ongoing in order to be included in the required staff: child ratios at level 2 or level 3.

At nursery, we take in to account the number of children, staff, layout of premises to ensure that a paediatric first aider is able to respond to emergencies quickly.

 

All trained first aiders are listed in the Accidents and first aid policy. Our trained first aiders are (Alex Ataide, Luis Ataide, Louise Wright, Ellie Shilling):

 

Health and safety arrangements

  • All staff are responsible for general health and safety in the nursery
  • Risk assessments will be conducted on all areas of the nursery, including rooms, activities, outdoor areas, resources, cleaning equipment, legionella and lone working
  • Risk assessments are reviewed at regular intervals and when arrangements change
  • All outings away from the nursery (however short) will include a prior risk assessment – more details are included in our Visits and outings policy
  • All equipment, rooms and outdoor areas are checked thoroughly by staff before children access them or the area. These checks are recorded and initialled by the staff responsible. Unsafe areas are made safe where possible or the area is not used to promote the safety of children. In these cases the manager will be notified immediately
  • We provide appropriate facilities for all children, staff, parents and visitors to receive a warm welcome and provide for their basic care needs e.g. easy to access toilet area and fresh drinking water
  • We adhere to the Control of Substances Hazardous to Health Regulation (COSHH) to ensure all children, staff, parents and visitors are safe in relation to any chemicals we may use on the premises
  • We identify and assess any water sources at risk of legionella[1], and manage these risks including avoiding stagnant water
  • All staff and students receive appropriate training in all areas of health and safety which includes risk assessments, manual handling, fire safety and emergency evacuation procedures. We may also use benefit risk assessments for particular activities and resources for children
  • We have a clear accident and first aid policy to follow in the case of any person in the nursery suffering injury from an accident or incident
  • We have a clear fire safety policy and procedure, which supports the prevention of fire and the safe evacuation of all persons in the nursery. This is shared with all staff, students, parents and visitors to the nursery
  • We review accident and incident records to identify any patterns or hazardous areas
  • All health and safety matters are reviewed informally on an ongoing basis and formally every six months or when something changes. Staff and parents receive these updates, as with all policy changes, as and when they happen
  • We welcome feedback from staff and parents. They are able to contribute to any policy through informal discussions, the suggestion scheme and/or during regular meetings held at nursery

[1] https://www.hse.gov.uk/legionnaires/

Inclusion and Equality Policy

Statement of intent

At ABC Wonderland we take great care to treat each individual as a person in their own right, with equal rights and responsibilities to any other individual, whether they are an adult or a child. We are committed to providing equality of opportunity and anti-discriminatory practice for all staff, children and families according to their individual needs. Discrimination on the grounds of age, disability, gender reassignment, marriage and civil partnership, pregnancy and maternity, race, religion or belief, sex and sexual orientation has no place within our nursery.

 

A commitment to implementing our Inclusion and equality policy is part of each employee’s job description. Should anyone believe that this policy is not being upheld, it is their duty to report the matter to the attention of the [nursery manager] at the earliest opportunity.

 

Appropriate steps will then be taken to investigate the matter and if such concerns are well-founded, the nursery’s Disciplinary procedure will be followed.

 

The legal framework for this policy is based on:

  • Special Education Needs and Disabilities Code of Practice 2015
  • Children and Families Act 2014
  • Equality Act 2010
  • Childcare Act 2006
  • Children Act 2004
  • Care Standards Act 2002
  • Special Educational Needs and Disability Act 2001.

 

The nursery and staff are committed to:

  • Recruiting, selecting, training and promoting individuals on the basis of occupational skills requirements. In this respect, the nursery will ensure that no job applicant or employee will receive less favourable treatment because of age, disability, gender reassignment, marriage and civil partnership, pregnancy and maternity, race, religion or belief, sex and sexual orientation
  • Creating a working environment free of bullying, harassment, victimisation and unlawful discrimination, promoting dignity and respect for all, and where individual differences and the contributions of all staff are recognised and valued
  • Providing a childcare place, wherever possible, for children who may have special educational needs and/or disabilities or are deemed disadvantaged according to their individual circumstances
  • Making reasonable adjustments for children with special educational needs and disabilities to remove barriers and improve access for all
  • Striving to promote equal access to services and projects by taking practical steps (wherever possible and reasonable), such as ensuring access to people with additional needs and by producing materials in relevant languages and media for all children and their families
  • Providing a secure environment in which all our families are listened to, children can flourish and all contributions are valued
  • Including and valuing the contribution of all families to our understanding of equality, inclusion and diversity
  • Providing positive non-stereotypical information
  • Continually improving our knowledge and understanding of issues of equality, inclusion and diversity and training all staff about their rights and responsibilities under the inclusion and equality policy.
  • Regularly reviewing, monitoring and evaluating the effectiveness of inclusive practices to ensure they promote and value diversity and difference and that the policy is effective and practices are non-discriminatory
  • Making inclusion a thread which runs through the entirety of the nursery, for example, by encouraging positive role models through the use of toys, imaginary play and activities, promoting non-stereotypical images and language and challenging all discriminatory behaviour (see Dealing with discriminatory behaviour policy).

 

Admissions and service provision

The nursery is accessible to all children and families in the local community and further afield through a comprehensive and inclusive admissions policy.

 

The nursery will strive to ensure that all services and projects are accessible and relevant to all groups and individuals in the community within targeted age groups.

 

Recruitment

Recruitment, promotion and other selection exercises such as redundancy selection will be conducted on the basis of merit, against objective criteria that avoids discrimination. Shortlisting will be done by more than one person, where possible.

 

All members of the selection group are committed to the inclusive practice set out in this policy and will have received appropriate training in this regard.

 

Application forms are sent out along with a copy of the equal opportunities monitoring form. Application forms do not include questions that potentially discriminate on the grounds specified in the statement of intent.

Vacancies are generally advertised to a diverse section of the labour market. Advertisements avoid stereotyping or using wording that may discourage particular groups from applying.

 

At interview, no questions are posed which potentially discriminate on the grounds specified in the statement of intent. All candidates are asked the same questions and members of the selection group will not introduce nor use any personal knowledge of candidates acquired outside the selection process. Candidates are given the opportunity to receive feedback on the reasons why they were not successful.

 

We may ask questions (under the Equality Act 2010) prior to offering someone employment in the following circumstances:

  • To establish whether the applicant will be able to comply with a requirement to undergo an assessment (i.e. an interview or selection test)
  • To establish whether the applicant will be able to carry out a function that is intrinsic to the work concerned
  • To monitor diversity in the range of people applying for work
  • To take positive action towards a particular group – for example offering a guaranteed interview scheme

 

The National College for Teaching and Leadership provides further guidance specific to working with children, which we follow:

 

Providers have a responsibility to ensure that practitioners have the health and physical capacity to teach and will not put children and young people at risk of harm. The activities that a practitioner must be able to perform are set out in the Education (Health Standards England) Regulations 2003. Providers are responsible for ensuring that only practitioners who have the capacity to teach remain on the staff team.

 

People with disabilities or chronic illnesses may have the capacity to teach, just as those without disabilities or medical conditions may be unsuitable to teach. Further information on training to teach with a disability is available from the DfE website.

 

Successful applicants offered a position may be asked to complete a fitness questionnaire prior to commencing the programme. Providers should not ask all-encompassing health questions, but should ensure that they only ask targeted and relevant health-related questions, which are necessary to ensure that a person is able to teach.

 

Staff

It is our policy not to discriminate in the treatment of individuals. All staff are expected to co-operate with the implementation, monitoring and improvement of this and other policies. They are expected to challenge language, actions, behaviours and attitudes which are oppressive or discriminatory on the grounds specified in this policy and recognise and celebrate other cultures and traditions. All staff are expected to participate in equality and inclusion training.

 

Staff will follow the Dealing with discriminatory behaviour policy where applicable to report any discriminatory behaviours observed.

 

Training

The nursery recognises the importance of training as a key factor in the implementation of an effective inclusion and equality policy. All new staff receive induction training including specific reference to the Inclusion and equality policy. The nursery strives towards the provision of inclusion, equality and diversity training for all staff on a [insert details e.g. annual] basis.

 

Early learning framework

We follow the Early Years Foundation Stage statutory requirements and ensure that all learning opportunities offered in the nursery encourage children to develop positive attitudes to people who are different from them. Our curriculum encourages children to empathise with others and to begin to develop the skills of critical thinking.

 

We do this by:

  • Identifying a key person to each child who will ensure that each child’s care is tailored to meet their individual needs and continuously observe, assess and plan for their learning and development
  • Listening to children’s verbal and non-verbal communication and making children feel included, valued and good about themselves
  • Ensuring that we know what each child knows and “can do” and has equal access to tailored early learning and play opportunities
  • Reflecting the widest possible range of communities in the choice of resources
  • Avoiding stereotypical or derogatory images in the selection of materials
  • Acknowledging and celebrating a wide range of religions, beliefs and festivals
  • Creating an environment of mutual respect
  • Supporting children to talk about their feelings and those of others, manage emotions and develop empathy
  • Helping children to understand that discriminatory behaviour and remarks are unacceptable
  • Knowing children well, being able to meet their needs and know when they require further support
  • Ensuring that all early learning opportunities offered are inclusive of children with special educational needs and/or disabilities and children from disadvantaged backgrounds
  • Ensuring that children whose first language is not English have full access to our early learning opportunities and are supported in their learning
  • Working in partnership with all families to ensure they understand the policy and challenge any discriminatory comments made
  • Ensuring the medical, cultural and dietary needs of all children are met and help children to learn about a range of food and cultural approaches to meal times and to respect the differences among them.

 

Parent information and meetings

Information about the nursery, its activities, experiences and resources are shared with parents as well as information about their child’s development. This is given in a variety of ways according to individual needs (written, verbal and translated), to ensure that all parents can access the information they need.

Wherever possible, meetings are arranged to give all families opportunities to attend and share information about their child.

 

We also consult with parents regularly about the running of the nursery and ask them to contribute their ideas.

Infection Control

Infection Control Policy

 

At ABC Wonderland we promote the good health of all children attending (including oral health) through maintaining high hygiene standards to help reduce the chances of infection being spread. We follow the health protection in schools and other childcare facilities guidance[1] which sets out when and how long children need to be excluded from settings, when treatment and/or medication is required and where to get further advice from.

 

Viruses and infections can be easily passed from person to person by breathing in air containing the virus, which is produced when an infected person talks, coughs or sneezes. It can also spread through hand and face contact after touching a person or surface contaminated with viruses.

 

We follow the guidance below to prevent a virus or infection from spreading around the nursery.

 

Our staff:

  • Encourage all children to use tissues when coughing and sneezing to catch germs
  • Ensure all tissues are disposed of in a hygienic way and all children and staff wash their hands once the tissue is disposed of
  • Develop children’s understanding of the above and the need for good hygiene procedures in helping them to stay healthy
  • Wear the appropriate Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) when changing nappies, toileting children and dealing with any other bodily fluids. Staff are requested to dispose of these in the appropriate manner and wash hands immediately
  • Clean and sterilise all potties and changing mats before and after each use
  • Clean toilets at least daily and check them throughout the day
  • Remind children to wash their hands before eating, after visiting the toilet, playing outside or being in contact with any animal and explain the reasons for this
  • Clean all toys, equipment and resources on a regular basis by following a comprehensive cleaning rota and using antibacterial cleanser, or through washing in the washing machine
  • Wash or clean all equipment used by babies and toddlers as and when needed, including when the children have placed it in their mouth
  • Store dummies in individual hygienic dummy boxes labelled with the child’s name to prevent cross-contamination with other children
  • Store toothbrushes (where applicable) hygienically to prevent cross-contamination
  • Immediately clean and sterilise (where necessary) any dummy or bottle that falls on the floor or is picked up by another child
  • Provide labelled individual bedding for children that is not used by any other child and wash this at least once a week
  • Ask parents and visitors to remove all outdoor footwear, or use shoe covers, when entering rooms where children may be crawling or sitting on the floor
  • Where applicable wear specific indoor shoes or slippers whilst inside the rooms and make sure that children wear them as well
  • Follow the Sickness and illness policy when children are ill to prevent the spread of any infection in the nursery. Staff are also requested to stay at home if they are ill and/or are contagious.

 

In addition:

  • The nursery manager retains the right of refusal of all children, parents, carers, staff and visitors who are deemed contagious and may impact on the welfare of the rest of the nursery
  • Parents will be made aware of the need for these procedures in order for them to follow these guidelines whilst in the nursery
  • Periodically each room in the nursery will be deep cleaned including carpets and soft furnishings to ensure the spread of infection is limited. This will be implemented earlier if the need arises
  • In the event of an infection outbreak the nursery will, where appropriate, undertake a deep clean to ensure the spread of infection is contained
  • We will follow Government health guidance, as well as seeking legal advice and information from our insurers, on any national outbreak of a virus and/or pandemic and keep parents informed of any course of action. Each specific circumstance will differ and to ensure we take the most appropriate action; we will treat each case on an individual basis
  • In addition, where contagious outbreaks occur, we will adopt Government guidance for all visitors to minimise the risk of further spreading of the infection
  • The nursery will ensure stocks of tissues, hand washing equipment, cleaning materials and sterilising fluid are maintained at all times. These will be increased during the winter months, or when flu and cold germs are circulating.

[1] https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/health-protection-in-schools-and-other-childcare-facilities

Late Collection and Non-Collection of Children Policy

At ABC Wonderland we have morning, afternoon and all day sessions. Parents are able to collect their child from the nursery flexibly within this time period.  We ask them to be no later than the contracted end time, for example if they attend the morning  we expect children to be collected no later than *12pm, and afternoon or all day session no later than *6pm. We understand that some parents may arrive earlier to collect their child, which is acceptable. However, the full fees still remain in place for the allocated session times.

 

We give parents information about the procedures to follow if they expect to be late. These include:

  • Calling the nursery as soon as possible to advise of their situation and expected time of arrival
  • Agreeing a safety password with the nursery in advance to be used by anyone collecting a child who is not the parent (designated adult)
  • Asking a designated adult to collect their child wherever possible
  • Informing the nursery of this person’s identity so the nursery can talk to the child if appropriate. This will help to reduce or eliminate any distress caused by this situation
  • If the designated person is not known to the nursery staff, the parent must provide a detailed description of this person, including their date of birth where known. This designated person must know the individual child’s safety password in order for the nursery to release the child into their care. This is the responsibility of the parent.

 

If a child has not been collected from the nursery after a reasonable amount of time [15 minutes] has been allowed for lateness, we initiate the following procedure:

  • The nursery manager will be informed that a child has not been collected.
  • The manager will check for any information regarding changes to normal routines, parents’ work patterns or general information. If there is no information recorded, the manager will try to contact the parents on the telephone numbers provided for their mobile, home or work. If this fails the manager will try the emergency contacts shown on the child’s records
  • The manager or staff member in charge and one other member of staff must stay behind with the child (if outside normal operating hours). During normal operating times, the nursery will plan to meet required staff ratios. If the parents have still not collected the child, the manager will telephone all contact numbers available every 10 minutes until contact is made. These calls will be logged on a full incident record
  • In the event of no contact being made after one hour has lapsed, the person in charge will ring the local authority children’s social services emergency duty team
  • The nursery will inform Ofsted as soon as convenient
  • The two members of staff will remain in the building until suitable arrangements have been made for the collection of the child
  • The child’s welfare and needs will be met at all times and to minimise distress staff will distract, comfort and reassure the child during the process
  • In order to provide this additional care a late fee of [£ 10 per 15 minutes] will be charged to parents. This will pay for any additional operational costs that caring for a child outside their normal nursery hours may incur.

 

Contact numbers:

NameContact No
Social Services Emergency Duty Team0800 917 1109
Ofsted0300 123 1231

 

 

 

 

Managing Extreme Weather Policy

At ABC Wonderland we have an extreme weather policy in place to ensure our nursery is prepared for all weather conditions that might affect the running of the nursery such as floods, snow and heat waves.

 

If any of these impact on the ability of the nursery to open or operate, we will contact parents via * text message.

 

We will not take children outdoors where we judge that weather conditions make it unsafe to do so.

 

Flood

In the case of a flood, we will follow our Critical incident policy to enable all children and staff to be safe and plan for continuity of care.

 

Snow or other severe weather

If high snowfall, or another severe weather condition such as dense fog, is threatened during a nursery day then the manager will decide whether to close the nursery. This decision will take into account the safety of the children, their parents and the staff team. In the event of a planned closure during the nursery day, we will contact all parents to arrange for collection of their child.

 

In the event of staff shortages due to snow or other severe weather, we will contact all available off duty staff and/or agency staff and group the children differently until they are able to arrive. If we are unable to maintain statutory ratio requirements after all options have been explored, we will contact Ofsted to inform them of this issue, recording all details in our incident file. If we feel the safety, health or welfare of the children is compromised then we will take the decision to close the nursery.

 

Heat wave

We are committed to ensuring that all children are fully protected from the dangers of too much sun and UV rays as severe sunburn in childhood can lead to the development of malignant melanoma (the most dangerous type of skin cancer) in later life.

 

Staff will make day-to-day decisions about the length of time spent outside depending on the strength of the sun and find the right balance to protect children from sunburn by following the NHS guidance.  The benefits are discussed with parents and their wishes followed with regard to clothing, hats and sun cream.

 

We follow guidance from the weather and UV level reports and use the following procedures to keep children safe and healthy in the sun:

  • Children must have a clearly labelled sun hat which will be worn at all times whilst outside in sunny weather. This hat will preferably be of legionnaires design to provide additional protection i.e. with an extended back and side to shield children’s neck and ears from the sun
  • Children must have their own labelled high factor sun cream with prior written consent for staff to apply. This enables children to have sun cream suitable for their own individual needs. Staff must be aware of the expiry date and discard sunscreen after this date. Sun cream containing nut-based ingredients will not be allowed in the setting
  • Parents are requested to supply light-weight cotton clothing for their children suitable for the sun, with long sleeves and long legs
  • Children’s safety and welfare in hot weather is the nursery’s prime objective so staff will work closely with parents to ensure all appropriate cream and clothing is provided
  • Staff will make day-to-day decisions about the length of time spent outside depending on the strength of the sun (UV levels); children will not be allowed in direct sunlight between 11.00am – 3.00pm on hot days without sun protection, hat and t-shirt, following NHS sun safety advice
  • Shaded areas are provided to ensure children are able to go out in hot weather, cool down or escape the sun should they wish to or need to
  • Children will always have sun cream applied before going outside in the hot weather and at frequent intervals during the day
  • Children are encouraged to drink cooled water more frequently throughout sunny or warm days and this will be accessible both indoors and out
  • Children are made aware of the need for sun hats, sun cream and the need to drink more fluids during their time in the sun
  • Key persons also work with the parents of their key children to decide and agree on suitable precautions to protect children from burning, including those with more sensitive skin types and those that may be more tolerant to the sunshine, e.g. Black and/or Asian colouring.

 

Vitamin D

Sunlight is important for the body to receive vitamin D. We need vitamin D to help the body absorb calcium and phosphate from our diet. These minerals are important for healthy bones, teeth and muscles. Our bodies create vitamin D from direct sunlight on our skin when we are outdoors. Most people can make enough vitamin D from being out in the sun daily for short periods with their hands or other body parts uncovered.

 

We also promote the NHS recommendation to parents that all children aged under 5 years should be given vitamin D supplements even if they do get out in the sun.

 

 

Medication Policy

At ABC Wonderland we promote the good health of children attending nursery and take necessary steps to prevent the spread of infection (see Sickness and illness and Infection control policies). If a child requires medicine, we will obtain information about the child’s needs for this and will ensure this information is kept up to date.

 

We follow strict guidelines when dealing with medication of any kind in the nursery and these are set out below.

 

Medication prescribed by a doctor, dentist, nurse or pharmacist

(Medicines containing aspirin will only be given if prescribed by a doctor)

 

  • Prescription medicine will only be given when prescribed by the above and for the person named on the bottle for the dosage stated
  • Medicines must be in their original containers with their instructions printed in English
  • Those with parental responsibility for any child requiring prescription medication should hand over the medication to the most appropriate member of staff who will then note the details of the administration on the appropriate form and another member of staff will check these details
  • Those with parental responsibility must give prior written permission for the administration of each and every medication. However, we will accept written permission once for a whole course of medication or for the ongoing use of a particular medication under the following circumstances:
  1. The written permission is only acceptable for that brand name of medication and cannot be used for similar types of medication e.g. if the course of antibiotics changes, a new form will need to be completed
  2. The dosage on the written permission is the only dosage that will be administered. We will not give a different dose unless a new form is completed
  3. Parents must notify us IMMEDIATELY if the child’s circumstances change e.g. a dose has been given at home, or a change in strength or dose needs to be given
  • The nursery will not administer a dosage that exceeds the recommended dose on the instructions unless accompanied by written instructions from a relevant health professional such as a letter from a doctor or dentist
  • The parent must be asked when the child has last been given the medication before coming to nursery and the staff member must record this information on the medication form. Similarly, when the child is picked up, the parent must be given precise details of the times and dosage given throughout the day. The parent’s signature must be obtained at both times
  • At the time of administering the medicine, a senior member of staff will ask the child to take the medicine, or offer it in a manner acceptable to the child at the prescribed time and in the prescribed form. (It is important to note that staff working with children are not legally obliged to administer medication)
  • If the child refuses to take the appropriate medication, then a note will be made on the form
  • Where medication is ‘essential’ or may have side effects, discussion with the parent will take place to establish the appropriate response.

 

Non-prescription medication (these will not usually be administrated)

  • The nursery will not administer any non-prescription medication containing aspirin
  • The nursery will only administer non-prescription medication for a short initial period, dependant on the medication or the condition of the child. After this time medical attention should be sought
  • If the nursery feels the child would benefit from medical attention rather than non-prescription medication, we reserve the right to refuse nursery care until the child is seen by a medical practitioner
  • If a child needs liquid paracetamol or similar medication during their time at nursery, such medication will be treated as prescription medication with the nursery providing one specific type of medication (Nurofen, Capol) should parents wish to use this and parents will be notified beforehand.
  • On registration, parents will be asked if they would like to fill out a medication form to consent to their child being given a specific type of liquid paracetamol or antihistamine in particular circumstances such as an increase in the child’s temperature or a wasp or bee sting. This form will state the dose to be given, the circumstances in which this can be given e.g. the temperature increase of their child, the specific brand name or type of non-prescription medication and a signed statement to say that this may be administered in an emergency if the nursery CANNOT contact the parent.
  • An emergency nursery supply of fever relief (Nurofen, Calpol) and antihistamines ( Piriton) will be stored on site. This will be checked at regular intervals by the designated trained first aider to make sure that it complies with any instructions for storage and is still in date
  • If a child does exhibit the symptoms for which consent has been given to give non-prescription medication during the day, the nursery will make every attempt to contact the child’s parents. Where parents cannot be contacted then the nursery manager will take the decision as to whether the child is safe to have this medication based on the time the child has been in the nursery, the circumstances surrounding the need for this medication and the medical history of the child on their registration form
  • Giving non-prescription medication will be a last resort and the nursery staff will use other methods first to try and alleviate the symptoms (where appropriate). The child will be closely monitored until the parents collect the child
  • For any non-prescription cream for skin conditions e.g. Sudocrem, prior written permission must be obtained from the parent and the onus is on the parent to provide the cream which should be clearly labelled with the child’s name
  • If any child is brought to the nursery in a condition in which he/she may require medication sometime during the day, the manager will decide if the child is fit to be left at the nursery. If the child is staying, the parent must be asked if any kind of medication has already been given, at what time and in what dosage and this must be stated on the medication form
  • As with any kind of medication, staff will ensure that the parent is informed of any non-prescription medicines given to the child whilst at the nursery, together with the times and dosage given
  • The nursery DOES NOT administer any medication unless prior written consent is given for each and every medicine.

 

Injections, pessaries, suppositories

  • As the administration of injections, pessaries and suppositories represents intrusive nursing, we will not administer these without appropriate medical training for every member of staff caring for this child. This training is specific for every child and not generic. The nursery will do all it can to make any reasonable adjustments including working with parents and other professionals to arrange for appropriate health officials to train staff in administering the medication.  For children with long term medical requirements, an Individual Health Care Plan from the relevant health team will be in place to ensure that appropriate arrangements are in place to meet the child’s needs.

 

Staff medication

All nursery staff have a responsibility to work with children only where they are fit to do so. Staff must not work with children where they are infectious or feel unwell and cannot meet children’s needs. This includes circumstances where any medication taken affects their ability to care for children, for example, where it makes a person drowsy.

 

If any staff member believes that their condition, including any condition caused by taking medication, is affecting their ability to care for children they must inform their line manager and seek medical advice. *The nursery manager/person’s line manager/registered provider will decide if a staff member is fit to work, including circumstances where other staff members notice changes in behaviour suggesting a person may be under the influence of medication. This decision will include any medical advice obtained by the individual or from an occupational health assessment.

 

Where staff may occasionally or regularly need medication, any such medication must be kept in the person’s locker or a separate locked container in the staff room or nursery room where staff may need easy access to the medication such as an asthma inhaler. In all cases it must be stored securely out of reach of the children, at all times. It must not be kept in the first aid box and must be labelled with the name of the member of staff.

 

Storage

All medication for children must have the child’s name clearly written on the original container and kept in a closed box, which is out of reach of all children.

 

Emergency medication, such as inhalers and EpiPens, will be within easy reach of staff in case of an immediate need, but will remain out of children’s reach. Any antibiotics requiring refrigeration must be kept in a fridge inaccessible to children.  This must be in a designated place with the child’s name clearly written in the original container.

 

All medications must be in their original containers, labels must be legible and not tampered with or they will not be given. All prescription medications should have the pharmacist’s details and notes attached to show the dosage needed and the date the prescription was issued. This will all be checked, along with expiry dates, before staff agree to administer medication.

 

Medication stored in the setting will be regularly checked with the parents to ensure it continues to be required, along with checking that the details of the medication form remain current.

 

Missing Child from Nursery Procedure

At ABC Wonderland we take all reasonable steps to ensure the safety of children on the premises. We only release children into the care of individuals who have been notified to us by the parent and have safety systems in place to ensure that children do not leave the premises unsupervised (safety measures, high handles, double doors, , locks etc.)

 

In the unlikely event of a child going missing within or from the nursery, we have the following procedure which will be implemented immediately:

  • All staff will be aware of the procedure when a child goes missing and supply information to support the search e.g. a recent photograph and a detailed description of clothing
  • The nursery manager will be informed immediately and all staff present will be informed. Some staff will be deployed to start an immediate thorough search of the nursery, followed by a search of the surrounding area, whilst ensuring that some staff remain with the other children so they remain supervised, calm and supported throughout
  • The manager will call the police as soon as they believe the child is missing and follow police guidance. The parents of the missing child will also be contacted
  • A second search of the area will be carried out
  • During this period, available staff will be continually searching for the missing child, whilst other staff maintain as near to normal routine as possible for the rest of the children in the nursery
  • The manager will meet the police and parents
  • The manager will then await instructions from the police
  • In the unlikely event that the child is not found, the nursery will follow the local authority and police procedure
  • Any incidents must be recorded in writing as soon as practicably possible including the outcome, who was lost, time identified, notification to police and findings
  • Ofsted will be contacted and informed of the incident
  • With incidents of this nature parents, children and staff may require support and reassurance following the traumatic experience. Management will provide this or seek further support where necessary
  • In any cases with media attention staff will not speak to any media representatives
  • Post-incident risk assessments will be conducted following any incident of this nature to enable the chance of this reoccurring being reduced.

 

 

Missing Child from Outings Procedure

At ABC Wonderland we take all reasonable steps to ensure children are kept safe while on outings. We assess the risks or hazards that may arise for children and identify steps to remove, minimise and manage those risks and hazards. This includes the consideration of adult to child ratios and carrying out regular head counts of children throughout any outing or visit.

 

In the unlikely event of a child going missing whilst on an outing we have the following procedure which we implement immediately:

  • All staff are aware of the procedure when a child goes missing and supply information to support the search e.g. a recent photograph and a detailed description of clothing
  • The designated person in charge or most senior member of staff is informed immediately and all staff present will be informed. Some staff will be deployed to start an immediate thorough search of the area, ensuring that all other children remain supervised, calm and supported throughout
  • If appropriate, on-site security will also be informed and a description given
  • The designated person in charge or most senior member of staff will immediately inform the police
  • The designated person in charge or most senior member of staff will then inform the nursery who will contact the child’s parents giving details of what has happened. If the whole nursery is on an outing, all contact details will be taken on the trip by the person in charge
  • During this period, some staff will be continually searching for the missing child, whilst other staff maintain the safety and welfare of the remaining children
  • It will be the designated person in charge or most senior member of staff responsibility to ensure that there are adequate staff to care for the children and get them back safely, a member of staff to meet the police and someone to continue the search (this may mean contacting relief staff)
  • Any incidents must be recorded in writing as soon as practicably possible including the outcome, who was lost, time identified, notification to police and findings
  • In the unlikely event that the child is not found, the nursery will follow the local authority and police procedure
  • Ofsted will be contacted and informed of any incidents
  • With incidents of this nature parents, children and staff may require support and reassurance following the traumatic experience. Management will provide this or seek further support where necessary
  • In any cases with media attention, staff will not speak to any media representatives
  • Post-incident risk assessments will be conducted following any incident of this nature to enable the chance of this reoccurring being reduced.

 

 

Mobile Phone and Electronic Device Use Policy

Mobile phones and other devices that accept calls, messages and video calling

At ABC Wonderland we promote the safety and welfare of all children in our care. We believe our staff should be completely attentive during their hours of working to ensure all children in the nursery receive good quality care and education.

 

To ensure the safety and well-being of children we do not allow staff to use personal mobile phones, smartwatches and/or fitness watches during working hours.

 

We use mobile phones supplied by the nursery only to provide a means of contact in certain circumstances, such as outings.

 

This policy should be used in conjunction with our Online safety policy and Acceptable internet use policy, to ensure children are kept safe when using the nursery devices online.

 

Staff must adhere to the following:

  • Mobile phones, smartwatches and fitness watches are either turned off or on silent and not accessed during working hours
  • Mobile phones, smartwatches and fitness watches can only be used on a designated break and then this must be away from the children
  • Mobile phones, smartwatches and fitness watches must be stored safely in the office  at all times during working hours
  • No personal device is allowed to be connected to the nursery Wi-Fi at any time
  • The use of nursery devices, such as tablets, must only be used for nursery purposes
  • The nursery devices will not have any social media or messaging apps on them, except those used by management for nursery purposes only
  • Any apps downloaded onto nursery devices must be done only by management. This will ensure only age and content appropriate apps are accessible to staff, or children using them
  • Passwords and/or passcodes for nursery devices must not be shared or written down, and will be changed regularly
  • During outings, staff must only use mobile phones belonging to the nursery
  • Only nursery owned devices will be used to take photographs or film videos
  • Nursery devices will not be taken home with staff and will remain secure at the setting when not in use.

Parent use of mobile phones and smartwatches

Parents are kindly asked to refrain from using their mobile telephones whilst in the nursery or when collecting or dropping off their children.  We will ask any parents using their phone inside the nursery premises to finish the call or take the call outside. We do this to ensure all children are safeguarded and the time for dropping off and picking up is a quality handover opportunity where we can share details about your child

 

Parents are requested not to allow their child to wear or bring in devices that may take photographs or record videos or voices. This includes smart watches with these capabilities, such as Vtech. This ensures all children are safeguarded and also protects their property as it may get damaged or misplaced at the nursery.

 

Visitors’ use of mobile phones and smartwatches

Visitors are not permitted to use their mobile phones or smart watches whilst at nursery and are asked to leave them in a safe secure place such as the nursery office for the duration of their visit.

 

Photographs and videos

At ABC Wonderland we recognise that photographs and video recordings play a part in the life of the nursery. We ensure that any photographs or recordings (including CCTV) taken of children in our nursery are only done with prior written permission from each child’s parent and only share photos with parents in a secure manner. We will obtain this permission when each child is registered and update it on a regular basis to ensure that this permission is still valid.

 

We ask for individual permissions for photographs and video recordings for a range of purposes including use in the child’s learning journey, for display purposes, for promotion materials including our nursery website, brochure and the local press and for security in relation to CCTV and the different social media platforms we use. We ensure that parents understand that where their child is also on another child’s photograph, but not as the primary person, that may be used in another child’s learning journey. Photographs and videos will not be taken in areas where intimate care routines are carried out.

 

If a parent is not satisfied about one or more of these uses, we will respect their wishes and find alternative ways of recording their child’s play or learning.

 

Staff are not permitted to take any photographs or recordings of a child on their own information storage devices e.g. cameras, mobiles, tablets or smartwatches and may only use those provided by the nursery. The nursery manager will monitor all photographs and recordings to ensure that the parents’ wishes are met and children are safeguarded.

 

Photographs or videos recorded on nursery mobile devices will be transferred to the correct storage device to ensure no images are left on these mobile devices.

 

Parents and children are not permitted to use any recording device or camera (including those on mobile phones or smartwatches) on the nursery premises without the prior consent of the manager.

During special events, e.g. Christmas or leaving parties, staff may produce group photographs to distribute to parents on request. In this case we will gain individual permission for each child before the event. This will ensure all photographs taken are in line with parental choice. We ask that photos of events such as Christmas parties are not posted on any social media websites or other platforms areas without permission from the parents of all the children included in the picture.

 

 

 

 Online learning journals

At ABC Wonderland we use tablets in the rooms to take photos of the children and record these directly on to their electronic learning journeys. We ensure that these devices are used for this purpose only and do not install applications such as social media or messaging sites on to these devices.

 

We carry out routine checks to ensure that emails and text messages (where applicable) have not been sent from these devices and remind staff of the Whistleblowing policy if they observe staff breaching these safeguarding procedures.

Nutrition and Mealtimes Policy

At ABC Wonderland we believe that mealtimes should be happy, social occasions for children and staff alike. We promote shared, enjoyable positive interactions at these times.

 

We are committed to offering children healthy, nutritious and balanced meals and snacks, which meet individual needs and requirements.

 

We ensure that:

  • A balanced and healthy breakfast, midday meal, tea and two daily snacks are provided for children attending a full day at the nursery
  • Menus are planned in advance and in line with example menu and guidance produced by the Department for Education. These are rotated regularly, reflect cultural diversity and variation and are displayed for children and parents to view
  • All allergens are displayed alongside the menus to show the contents of each meal
  • We provide nutritious food at all snack and mealtimes, avoiding large quantities of fat, sugar, salt and artificial additives, preservatives and colourings
  • Menus include at least 2 servings of fresh fruit and vegetables per day
  • Parents and children are involved in menu planning
  • Only milk and water are provided as drinks to promote oral health. Fresh drinking water is always available and accessible. It is frequently offered to children and babies and intake is monitored. In hot weather staff will encourage children to drink more water to keep them hydrated
  • Individual dietary requirements are respected. We gather information from parents regarding their children’s dietary needs, including any special dietary requirements, preferences and food allergies that a child has and any special health requirements, before a child starts or joins the nursery. Where appropriate, we will carry out a risk assessment in the case of allergies and work alongside parents to put into place an individual dietary plan for their child
  • We give careful consideration to seating to avoid cross contamination of food from child to child. Where appropriate, an adult will sit with children during meals to ensure safety and minimise risks. Where appropriate, discussions will also take place with children about allergies and potential risks to make them aware of the dangers of sharing certain foods
  • Staff show sensitivity in providing for children’s diets and allergies. They do not use a child’s diet or allergy as a label for the child, or make a child feel singled out because of her/his diet or allergy
  • Staff set a good example and eat with the children and show good table manners. Meal and snack times are organised so that they are social occasions in which children and staff participate in small groups. During meals and snack times children are encouraged to use their manners and conversation is encouraged
  • Staff use meal and snack times to help children to develop independence through making choices, serving food and drinks and feeding themselves
  • Staff support children to make healthy choices and understand the need for healthy eating
  • Where possible, we provide foods from the diet of each of the children’s cultural backgrounds, providing children with familiar foods and introducing them to new ones
  • Cultural differences in eating habits are respected
  • Any child who shows signs of distress at being faced with a meal he/she does not like will have his/her food removed without any fuss. If a child does not finish his/her first course, he/she will still be given a helping of dessert
  • Children not on special diets are encouraged to eat a small piece of everything
  • Children who refuse to eat at the mealtime are offered food later in the day
  • Children are given time to eat at their own pace and not rushed
  • Quantities offered take account of the ages of the children being catered for in line with recommended portion sizes for babies and young children
  • We promote positive attitudes to healthy eating through play opportunities and discussions
  • The nursery provides parents with daily written records of feeding routines for all children
  • No child is ever left alone when eating or drinking to minimise the risk of choking
  • We will sometimes celebrate special occasions such as birthdays with the occasional treat of foods such as cake, sweets or biscuits. These will be given at mealtimes to prevent tooth decay and not spoil the child’s appetite. Where we have frequent birthdays and celebrations, we consider other alternatives such as celebrating through smiles and praise, stickers and badges, choosing a favourite story, becoming a special helper, playing a party game, dancing and/or singing their favourite song
  • We *do allow parents to bring in cakes on special occasions. We ensure that all food brought in from parents meets the above and health and safety requirements and ingredients that are listed within the Food Information for Consumers (FIR) 2014 and detailed in the allergens policy and procedure
  • All staff who prepare and handle food are competent to do so and receive training in food hygiene which is updated every three years
  • In the very unlikely event of any food poisoning affecting two or more children on the premises, whether or not this may arise from food offered at the nursery, we will inform Ofsted as soon as reasonably practical and in all cases within 14 days. We will also inform the relevant health agencies and follow any advice given.

 

Packed lunches

We do not allow children to bring packed lunches into the setting.  We provide parents with guidelines for nutritious content and signpost to the NHS packed lunch guidance (https://www.nhs.uk/healthier-families/recipes/healthier-lunchboxes/).

 

We request parents use ice packs.  Children’s lunch boxes are checked prior to giving the contents to the children to ensure any risks from potential allergens or choking hazards are managed.

Online Safety Policy

Our nursery is aware of the growth of the internet and the advantages this can bring. However, it is also aware of the dangers it can pose and we strive to support children, staff and families to use the internet safely.

 

We refer to ‘Safeguarding children and protecting professionals in early years settings: online safety considerations’ to support this policy.

 

The Designated Safeguarding Lead is ultimately responsible for online safety concerns. All concerns need to be raised as soon as possible to Alex Ataide .

 

The use of technology has become a significant component of many safeguarding issues such as child sexual exploitation, radicalisation and sexual predation with technology often providing the platform that facilitates harm.

 

The breadth of issues included within online safety is considerable, but can be categorised into three areas of risk:

  • Content: being exposed to illegal, inappropriate or harmful material; for example, pornography, fake news, racist or radical and extremist views
  • Contact: being subjected to harmful online interaction with other users; for

example commercial advertising as well as adults posing as children or young adults, and

  • Conduct: personal online behaviour that increases the likelihood of, or causes,

harm; for example making, sending and receiving explicit images, or online bullying.

 

Within the nursery we aim to keep children, staff and parents safe online. Our safety measures include:

  • Ensuring we have appropriate antivirus and anti-spyware software on all devices and update them regularly
  • Ensuring content blockers and filters are on all our devices, e.g. computers, laptops, tablets and any mobile devices
  • Ensuring all devices are password protected and have screen locks. Practitioners are reminded to use complex strong passwords, keep them safe and secure, change them regularly and not to write them down
  • Monitoring all internet usage across the setting
  • Providing secure storage of all nursery devices at the end of each day
  • Ensuring no social media or messaging apps are installed on nursery devices
  • Reviewing all apps or games downloaded onto devices ensuring they are age and content appropriate
  • Using only nursery devices to record and /or photograph children in the setting
  • Never emailing personal or financial information
  • Reporting emails with inappropriate content to the internet watch foundation (IWF www.iwf.org.uk)
  • Teaching children how to stay safe online and report any concerns they have
  • Ensuring children are supervised when using internet connected devices
  • Using tracking software to monitor suitability of internet usage (for older children)
  • Not permitting staff or visitors private access to the nursery Wi-Fi
  • Talking to children about ‘stranger danger’ and deciding who is a stranger and who is not; comparing people in real life situations to online ‘friends’
  • When using online video chat, such as Zoom, Teams, Skype, FaceTime etc. (where applicable) discussing with the children what they would do if someone they did not know tried to contact them
  • Providing training for staff, at least annually, in online safety and understanding how to keep children safe online. We encourage staff and families to complete a free online safety briefing, which can be found at https://moodle.ndna.org.uk/
  • Staff modelling safe practice when using technology with children and ensuring all staff abide by an acceptable use policy such as instructing staff to use the nursery IT equipment for matters relating to the children and their education and care only. No personal use will be tolerated (see Acceptable internet use policy)
  • Monitoring children’s screen time to ensure they remain safe online and have access to material that promotes their development. We ensure that their screen time is within an acceptable level and is integrated within their programme of learning
  • Making sure the physical safety of users is considered, including the posture of staff and children when using devices
  • Being aware of the need to manage our digital reputation, including the appropriateness of information and content that is posted online, both professionally and personally. This is continually monitored by the setting’s management
  • Staff must not friend or communicate with parents on personal devices or social media accounts
  • Ensuring all electronic communications between staff and parents is professional and takes place via the official nursery communication channels, e.g. the setting’s email addresses and telephone numbers. This is to protect staff, children and parents
  • Signposting parents to appropriate sources of support regarding online safety at home

 

If any concerns arise relating to online safety, then we will follow our Safeguarding children and child protection policy and report all online safety concerns to the DSL.

 

The DSL will make sure that:

  • All staff know how to report a problem and when to escalate a concern, including the process for external referral
  • All concerns are logged, assessed and actioned in accordance with the nursery’s safeguarding procedures
  • Parents are supported to develop their knowledge of online safety issues concerning their children via newsletters and factsheets
  • Parents are offered support to help them talk about online safety with their children using appropriate resources
  • Parents are signposted to appropriate sources of support regarding online safety at home and are fully supported to understand how to report an online safety concern
  • Staff have access to information and guidance for supporting online safety, both personally and professionally
  • Under no circumstances should any member of staff, either at work or in any other place, make, deliberately download, possess, or distribute material they know to be illegal, for example child sexual abuse material.

 

Cyber Security

This policy should be read in conjunction with the Data protection and confidentiality policy, Acceptable internet use policy and GDPR privacy notice.

 

Good cyber security means protecting the personal or sensitive information we hold on children and their families in line with the Data Protection Act.    We are aware that cyber criminals will target any type of business including childcare and ensure all staff are aware of the value of the information we hold in terms of criminal activity e.g. scam emails. All staff are reminded to follow all the procedures above including backing up sensitive data, using strong passwords and protecting devices to ensure we are cyber secure.

 

To prevent any attempts of a data breach (which is when information held by a business is stolen or accessed without authorisation) that could cause temporary shutdown of our setting and reputational damage with the families we engage with, we inform staff not to open any suspicious messages such as official-sounding messages about ‘resetting passwords’, ‘receiving compensation’, ‘scanning devices’ or ‘missed deliveries’.

 

Staff are asked to report these to the manager as soon as possible and these will be reported through the NCSC Suspicious email reporting service at report@phishing.gov.uk.

 

Outdoor Play Policy

At ABC Wonderland we recognise the importance of daily outdoor play and physical development and are committed to ensure all children have daily access regardless of their age or stage of development. Where possible this includes the children having free access to the outdoors allowing them the freedom to choose whether to play indoors or out. We provide an inclusive outdoor play environment with areas for non-mobile children to freely explore. We make reasonable adjustments where required, in line with the Equality Act 2010. We go out to play with all children in all weathers (unless it is deemed unsafe).

 

We understand the vital role that learning outdoors has on children’s learning and development as well as the importance of regular access to outdoor play in order to keep fit and healthy, develop children’s large and fine motor skills, experience learning in a natural environment and access sunlight in order to absorb vitamin D more effectively. We also refer to the Chief Medical Officers guidance on physical activity.[1]

 

The outdoor areas, both within the nursery grounds and in the local community, have a wealth of experiences and resources, which help children to learn and develop in a variety of ways, including independence, exploration and investigative skills, risk taking and self-esteem, all of which support children to develop skills now and for the future.

 

We take reasonable steps to ensure the safety of children through risk assessments whilst balancing the benefits to learning through providing an element of ‘risky play.’ This type of play allows children to explore and find their own boundaries in a safe environment with supportive practitioners. Staff are informed of the importance of safety procedures and are trained appropriately to ensure these procedures are followed effectively.

 

We ensure outdoor play is adequately supervised and we have robust safety checks in place, including regular head counts.

 

We obtain parental permission before any child leaves the nursery during the day. This includes short outings into the local community. There is more information in the Visits and outings policy.

 

We plan all outdoor play opportunities and outings to complement the early years curriculum. This includes providing children with purposeful activities and quality resources that support and follow their individual interests and the seven areas of learning and development. We plan both adult-led and child-initiated opportunities to enable children to learn and practice new skills, knowledge and behaviours. Where possible and in line with the children’s needs we will also often have snacks and meals outdoors and some children will sleep outdoors (see Sleep policy).

 

Where activities take place away from the setting (e.g. in the local wood) then a nursery mobile phone and first aid kit will be taken to ensure the safety of children at all times. A trained paediatric first aider will be present when children are away from the main setting.

We use this policy alongside the following policies to ensure the safety and welfare of children throughout their time outside:

  • Health and safety – general policy
  • Sun care
  • Caring for babies and toddlers
  • Missing child from nursery
  • Missing child from outings
  • Parents as partners
  • Supervision of children
  • Safeguarding children and child protection
  • Visits and outings.

 

[1] https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/physical-activity-guidelines

Parents as Partners Policy

At ABC Wonderland we welcome all parents as partners and support a two-way sharing of information that helps establish trust and understanding. We are committed to supporting parents in an open and sensitive manner and include them as an integral part of the care and early learning team within the nursery. Working together ensures we can meet the individual needs of the family and child and provide the highest quality of care and education.

 

The key person system supports engagement with all parents and we use strategies to ensure that all parents can contribute to their child’s learning and development. We ask parents to contribute to initial assessments of children’s starting points on entry and they are kept well informed about their children’s progress. We encourage parents to support and share information about their children’s learning and development at home and the key person seeks to engage them in guiding their child’s development at home too. The key person system ensures all practitioners use effective, targeted strategies and interventions to support learning that match most children’s individual needs.

 

Our policy is to:

  • Recognise and support parents as their child’s first and most important educators and to welcome them into the life of the nursery
  • Generate confidence and encourage parents to trust their own instincts and judgement regarding their own child
  • Welcome all parents into the nursery at any time and provide an area where parents can speak confidentially with us as required
  • Welcome nursing mothers. The nursery will make available a private area whenever needed to offer space and privacy to nursing mothers
  • Ensure nursery documentation and communications are provided in different and accessible formats to suit each parent’s needs e.g. Braille, multi-lingual, electronic communications
  • Ensure that all parents are aware of the nursery’s policies and procedures. A detailed parent prospectus will be provided and our full policy documents will be available to parents at all times *in the lobby and on the nursery website
  • Maintain regular contact with parents to help us to build a secure and beneficial working relationship for their children
  • Support parents in their own continuing education and personal development including helping them to develop their parenting skills and inform them of relevant conferences, workshops and training, where required
  • Create opportunities for parents to talk to other adults in a secure and supportive environment through such activities as open days, parents’ evenings and a parents’ forum
  • Inform parents about the range and type of activities and experiences provided for children, the daily routines of the setting, the types of food and drinks provided for children and events through regularly distributed newsletters
  • Operate a key person system to enable parents to establish a close, working relationship with a named practitioner and to support two-way information sharing about each child’s individual needs both in nursery and at home. Parents are given the name of the key person of their child and their role when the child starts and updates as they transition through the setting
  • Inform parents on a regular basis about their child’s progress and involve them in shared record keeping. Parents’ evenings are held at least twice a year. The nursery consults with parents about the times of meetings to avoid excluding anyone
  • Actively encourage parents to contribute to children’s learning through sharing observations, interests and experiences from home. This may be verbally, sharing photographs or in written form
  • Agree the best communication method with parents e.g. email, face-to-face, telephone and share information about the child’s day e.g. food eaten, activities, sleep times etc.
  • Consider and discuss all suggestions from parents concerning the care and early learning of their child and nursery operation
  • Provide opportunities and support for all parents to contribute their own skills, knowledge and interests to the activities of the nursery including signposting to relevant services, agencies and training opportunities
  • Inform all parents of the systems for registering queries, compliments, complaints or suggestions, and to check that these systems are understood by parents
  • Make sure all parents have access to our written Complaints and compliments policy
  • Share information about the Early Years Foundation Stage, young children’s learning in the nursery, how parents can further support learning at home and where they can access further information
  • Provide a written contract between the parent(s) and the nursery regarding conditions of acceptance and arrangements for payment
  • Respect the family’s religious and cultural backgrounds and beliefs and accommodate any special requirements wherever possible and practical to do so
  • Inform parents how the nursery supports children with special educational needs and disabilities
  • Find out the needs and expectations of parents. We will do this through regular feedback via questionnaires, suggestion system and encouraging parents to review working practices. We will evaluate any responses and publish these for parents with an action plan to inform future, policy and staff development.

 

Promoting Positive Behaviour Policy

At ABC Wonderland we believe that children flourish best when they feel safe and secure and have their needs met by supportive practitioners who act as good role models, show them respect and value their individual personalities. Children are supported through co-regulation, where adults and children work together towards a common purpose, including finding ways to resolve upsets from stress in any domain and return to balance leading onto a path to self-regulation. The nursery actively promotes British values and encourages and praises positive, caring and polite behaviour at all times and provides an environment where children learn to respect themselves, other people and their surroundings.

 

We implement the early years curriculum supporting children to develop their personal, social and emotional development. This involves helping children to understand their own feelings and others and beginning to regulate their behaviour. We support children to do this through working together with parents, having consistent approaches, structure, routine and age/stage appropriate boundaries appropriate to the emotional development of the child. We help build confidence and self-esteem by valuing all children and giving lots of praise and encouragement.

 

To support positive behaviour in our setting, we aim to:

  • Recognise the individuality of all our children
  • Provide a warm, responsive relationship where children feel respected, comforted and supported in times of stress, and confident that they are cared for at all times
  • Understand that certain behaviours are a normal part of some young children’s development e.g. biting
  • Encourage self-regulation, consideration for each other, our surroundings and property
  • Encourage children to participate in a wide range of group activities to enable them to develop their social skills
  • Ensure that all staff act as positive role models for children
  • Encourage parents, carers and other visitors to be positive role models
  • Work in partnership with parents by communicating openly
  • Praise children and acknowledge their positive actions and attitudes, therefore ensuring that children see that we value and respect them
  • Encourage all staff working with children to accept their responsibility for implementing the goals in this policy and to be consistent
  • Promote non-violence and encourage children to deal with conflict peacefully
  • Provide a key person system enabling staff to build a strong and positive relationship with children and their families
  • Provide activities and stories to help children learn about accepted behaviours, including opportunities for children to contribute to decisions about accepted behaviour where appropriate
  • Supporting and developing children’s understanding of different feelings and emotions, self-regulation and empathy as appropriate to stage of development. This includes using strategies and naming and talking about feelings and ways to manage them
  • Have a named person who has overall responsibility for promoting positive behaviour and behaviour support.

 

The named person  for promoting and supporting behaviour is Alex Ataide and Louise Wright. It is their role to:

  • Advise and support other staff on any behaviour concerns
  • Liaise with the setting’s Special Educational Needs Co-ordinator (SENCo) where a child requires further support, or there are concerns about the impact of the behaviour on a child’s education and care
  • Along with each room leader will keep up to date with legislation and research relating to promoting positive behaviour
  • Support changes to policies and procedures in the nursery
  • Access relevant sources of expertise where required and act as a central information source for all involved
  • Attend regular external training events, and ensure all staff attend relevant in-house or external training for behaviour management. Keep a record of staff attendance at this training.

 

 

Children who are displaying distressed and /or behaviour which challenges, for example, by physically abusing another child or adult e.g. biting, or through verbal bullying, are helped to talk through their feelings and actions through co-regulation before thinking about the situation and apologising if appropriate. We make sure that the child who has been upset is comforted. We always acknowledge when a child is feeling angry or upset and that it is the behaviour that is not acceptable, not the child or their feelings.

 

Our promoting positive behaviour procedure is:

  • We support all children to develop positive behaviour, and we make every effort to provide for their individual needs
  • We never use or threaten to use physical punishment or corporal punishment such as smacking or shaking or use or threaten any punishment that could adversely affect a child’s well being
  • We only use physical intervention (where practitioners may use reasonable force to prevent children from injuring themselves or others or damaging property) or to manage a child’s behaviour if absolutely necessary. We keep a record of any occasions where physical intervention is used and inform parents on the same day, or as reasonably practicable
  • We recognise that there may be occasions where a child is displaying distressed and /or behaviour which challenges and may need individual techniques to restrain them to prevent a child from injuring themselves or others. This will only be carried out by staff who have been appropriately trained to do so. Any restraints will only be done following recommended guidance and training and only with a signed agreement from parents on when to use it. We will complete an incident form following any restraints used and notify the parents
  • We do not single out children or humiliate them in any way. Where children are displaying behaviour which challenges they will, wherever possible, be distracted and re-directed to alternative activities. Discussions with children will take place as to why their behaviour was not acceptable, respecting their level of understanding and maturity
  • Staff do not raise their voices (other than to keep children safe)
  • In any case of behaviour which challenges, we always make it clear to the child or children in question, that it is the behaviour and not the child that is unwelcome
  • We decide on particular strategies to support particular types of behaviour depending on the child’s age, level of development and the circumstances surrounding the behaviour. This may involve asking the child to talk and think about what he/she has done. All staff support children in developing empathy and children will only be asked to apologise if they have developed strong empathy skills and have a good understanding of why saying sorry is appropriate
  • We help staff to reflect on their own responses towards behaviours that challenge to ensure that their reactions are appropriate
  • We inform parents if their child’s behaviour is unkind to others or if their child has been upset. In all cases we deal with behaviour that challenges in nursery at the time. We may ask parents to meet with staff to discuss their child’s behaviour, so that if there are any difficulties, we can work together to ensure consistency between their home and the nursery. In some cases, we may request additional advice and support from other professionals, such as an educational psychologist
  • We support children in developing non-aggressive strategies to enable them to express their feelings and emotions
  • We keep confidential records on any behaviour that challenges that has taken place. We inform parents and ask them to read and sign any incidents concerning their child
  • Through partnership with parents and formal observations, we make every effort to identify any behavioural concerns and the causes of that behaviour. From these observations and discussions, we will implement an individual behaviour support plan where a child’s behaviour involves aggressive actions towards other children and staff, for example hitting, kicking etc. The manager will complete risk assessments identifying any potential triggers or warning signs ensuring other children’s and staff’s safety at all times. In these instances, we may remove a child from an area until they have calmed down.

 

We recognise that children need their own time and space and that it is not always appropriate to expect a child to share. We believe it is important to acknowledge each child’s feelings and to help them understand how others might be feeling.

 

At our nursery, staff follow the procedure below to enable them to deal with behaviour that challenges:

  • Staff are encouraged to ensure that all children feel safe, happy and secure
  • Staff are encouraged to recognise that active physical aggression in the early years is part of the child’s development and that it should be channelled in a positive way
  • Children are helped to understand that using aggression to get things is inappropriate and they will be encouraged to resolve problems in other ways
  • Staff will initiate games and activities with children when they feel play has become overly boisterous or aggressive, both indoors and outdoors
  • We will ensure that this policy is available for staff and parents and it will be shared at least once a year to parents and staff
  • Staff and parents are also welcome to review and comment on the policy and procedure
  • If any parent has a concern about their child, a member of staff will be available to discuss those concerns. Working together can ensure our children feel confident and secure in their environment, both at home and in the nursery
  • All concerns will be treated in the strictest confidence.

 

Anti-bullying

We encourage children to recognise that bullying, fighting, hurting and discriminatory comments are not acceptable behaviour. We want children to recognise that certain actions are right and that others are wrong.

 

Bullying takes many forms. It can be physical, verbal or emotional, but it is always a repeated behaviour that makes other people feel uncomfortable or threatened.  We acknowledge that any form of bullying is unacceptable and will be dealt with immediately while recognising that physical aggression is part of children’s development in their early years. Staff will intervene when they think a child is being bullied, however mild or harmless it may seem and sensitively discuss any instance of bullying with the parents of all involved to look for a consistent resolution to the behaviour.

 

By promoting positive behaviour, valuing co-operation and a caring attitude, we hope to ensure that children will develop a positive sense of self, have confidence in their own abilities, make good friendships, co-operate and resolve conflicts peaceably. These will provide them with a secure platform for school and later life.

 

Quality Provision Policy

At ABC Wonderland we are passionate about providing high quality care and education for all children. High quality care leads directly to better outcomes for our children and all staff are committed to providing children with the best possible start in life and enable them to reach their full potential.

 

As part of our quality practice, we ensure children receive the highest quality care and education by:

  • Having high expectations for all children so they can achieve the best outcomes
  • Building close attachments with children so they feel safe, secure, happy and can thrive
  • Developing close relationships with families so together we can best support the child’s individual learning and development
  • Implementing all of the safeguarding and welfare requirements of the Early Years Foundation Stage (EYFS)
  • Ensuring that the EYFS learning and development requirements are embedded including providing a curriculum that is underpinned by the EYFS principles, educational programmes and seven areas of learning and development
  • Reflecting on all areas of practice and striving towards the Ofsted grade descriptors for outstanding quality indicators
  • Ensuring all the EYFS assessment requirements are met including the planning, observation, assessment and next steps and that they are linked to each individual child’s needs and interests and are evaluated for effectiveness
  • Having a highly qualified, skilled staff team that understand what is meant by high quality practice and how to deliver this, deploying staff appropriately to meet the individual needs of all children
  • Creating and achieving the nurseries quality vision, mission and outcomes
  • Consistently delivering high quality practice and teaching that makes a difference to children’s daily experiences
  • Ensuring a solid understanding of the importance of pedagogy and child development amongst all practitioners
  • Ensuring that the environment, resources and provision is of high quality both indoors and out; monitoring resources and equipment ensuring these are risk assessed and fit for purpose
  • Providing children with wonderful experiences and opportunities giving them the best start in life
  • Valuing continuous professional development for all staff and accessing a variety of training and development to support the needs of the children in the nursery
  • Appropriately assessing children’s learning and development and recognising where children may need support and acting on this quickly
  • Evaluating the effectiveness of training and link to the outcomes for children
  • Ensuring all staff are confident and supported in their roles and have the training and skills they need to be able to perform their roles
  • Conducting regular supervision meetings with all team members to ensure all staff are supported to be the best they can be
  • Using peer on peer observations to share, discuss and improve practice across the setting
  • Monitoring all practice and feedback ideas for improvement
  • Undertaking a quality improvement programme to ensure quality is embedded throughout the nursery
  • Engaging with families and carers and supporting the home learning environment
  • Operating a robust and embedded quality improvement and evaluation process across the whole setting that includes all parties such as practitioners, children, parents and external partners.

 

 

Recruitment, Selection and Suitability of Staff Policy

At ABC Wonderland we are vigilant in our recruitment procedures aiming to ensure that all people looking after children are suitable to fulfil the requirements of their role. We are committed to ensuring that all staff, including students, volunteers and any agency or supply staff are suitable to fulfil the requirements of their role in order to work with, or be in regular contact with, children.

 

We have effective systems in place to ensure that practitioners and any other person who may have regular contact with children are suitable, as part of the recruitment process as well as monitoring continued suitability, as part of regular staff and/or student supervision.

 

Every time we recruit a new member of staff to join our team, we follow these procedures:

 

  1. Legal requirements
  • We abide by all legal requirements relating to safer recruitment set out in the Statutory Framework for the Early Years Foundation Stage (EYFS) and accompanying regulations, including our legal responsibilities under the Equality Act 2010
  • We also follow any requirements or guidance given by the Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) in relation to carrying out checks. We abide by the employer’s responsibilities by informing the DBS of any changes to the suitability of our staff, whether this member of staff has left the nursery or is still under investigation. Please refer to the Safeguarding children and child protection policy for further information.

 

  1. Advertising
  • We use (reputable newspapers, websites, job sites, social media sites, local job centre) to advertise for any vacancies
  • We ensure that all recruitment literature includes details of our equal opportunities policy and our safer recruitment procedures, including an enhanced DBS check and at least two independent references for every new employee. We also include the requirement for an additional criminal records check (or checks if more than one country) for anyone who has lived or worked abroad.

 

  1. Interview stage
  • We shortlist all suitable candidates against pre-set specification and ensure all applicants receive correspondence regardless of whether they are successful in reaching the interview stage or not
  • All shortlisted candidates receive a job description, a person specification, an equal opportunities monitoring form and a request for identification prior to the interview
  • The manager decides the most appropriate people for the interview panel. There will be at least two people involved in the overall decision making
  • At the start of each interview all candidates’ identities are checked using, for example, their passport and/or photo card driving licence. All candidates are required to prove they are eligible to work in the UK. The interview will also cover any gaps in the candidate’s employment history
  • All candidates reaching the interview stage are questioned using the same set criteria and questions. These cover specific areas of childcare, including safeguarding the children in their care, planning suitable activities to enhance the child’s development and their understanding of the legal frameworks applied to childcare and used in the nursery. The questions are value based and will ensure the candidate has the same values as the nursery with regards to the safety and welfare of the children in their care
  • Candidates will be given a score for their answers including a score for their individual experience and qualifications
  • Every shortlisted candidate will be asked to take part in a supervised practical exercise which will involve spending time in a particular age group in the nursery interacting with the children, staff and, where appropriate, parents
  • In addition, the manager may choose to carry out an online search for every shortlisted candidate. This may help identify any incidents or issues publicly available online, which may be explored with the applicant at interview
  • The manager and deputy will then select the most suitable person for this position based on these scores and their knowledge and understanding of the early years framework as well as the needs of the nursery
  • Every candidate will receive communication from the nursery stating whether they have been successful or not. Unsuccessful candidates are offered feedback.

 

  1. Starting work
  • The successful candidate will be offered the position subject to at least two references from previous employment or, in the case of a newly qualified student, their tutor and a personal or professional reference. These references will be taken up BEFORE employment commences. This may be verbal initially and then followed up with a written reference which will form part of their personnel file
  • The successful candidate will be asked to provide proof of their qualifications, where applicable. All qualifications will be checked and copies taken for their personnel files where applicable
  • Prior to employment but after the job has been offered, a health check questionnaire will be given to the employee and its results will be taken into account in making an overall decision about suitability. The nursery reserves the right to take any further advice necessary in relation to a person’s physical and mental fitness to carry out their role. Please see the Absence management procedure for more details about how the nursery manages health problems including access to medical records
  • All new starters, other than those who have registered for the continuous updating service (see below), will be subject to an enhanced Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) check. This will be initiated before the member of staff commences work in the nursery and they will not have unsupervised access to any child or children’s records before this check comes back clear. Further to this, without an up-to-date enhanced DBS check, the new starter will not be allowed to take photographs of any child, look at their learning and development log or change the nappy of any child (whether supervised or not)
  • An additional criminal records check (or checks if more than one country) should also be made for anyone who has lived or worked abroad
  • The nursery will record and retain details about individuals, including staff qualifications, identity checks carried out and the vetting process completed. This will include the DBS reference number, the date the disclosure was obtained and details of who obtained it. The nursery will not retain copies of the disclosure itself once the employment decision is taken
  • There may be occasions when a DBS check is not clear, but the individual is still suitable to work with children. This will be treated on an individual case basis and at the *manager’s discretion taking the following into account:
    • seriousness of the offence or other information
    • accuracy of the person’s self-disclosure on the application form
    • nature of the appointment including levels of supervision
    • age of the individual at the time of the offence or other information
    • the length of time that has elapsed since the offence or other information
    • relevance of the offence or information to working or being in regular contact with children.
  • If the individual has registered on the DBS system since 17 July 2013, managers may use the update service with the candidate’s permission instead of carrying out an enhanced DBS check
  • New starters are required to sign (either application form, contract or separate form) to state that they have no criminal convictions, court orders or any other reasons that disqualify them from working with children or identify that they are unsuitable to do so
  • All new members of staff will undergo an intensive induction period during which time they will read and discuss the nursery policies and procedures and be assigned a mentor or buddy who will introduce them to the way in which the nursery operates
  • During their induction period all new staff will receive training on how to safeguard children in their care and follow the Safeguarding children and child protection policy, Lock down policy, Inclusion and equality policy and health and safety issues
  • The new member of staff will have regular meetings with the manager and their mentor or buddy during their induction period to discuss their progress, support required and/or further training and professional development opportunities.

 

  1. Delayed DBS checks
  • Where possible, staff will have the checks completed prior to starting employment. As long as the DBS check has been applied for, if there are delays in the results coming through, staff may work in the nursery before these checks are completed as a last resort, but they must be supervised at all times by staff who already hold an enhanced check. All nursery staff will be informed of any staff awaiting enhanced DBS clearance.
  • Staff awaiting these checks will never:
    • Be left unsupervised whilst caring for children
    • Take children for toilet visits unless supervised by staff holding an enhanced check
    • Change nappies
    • Be left alone in a room or outside with children
    • Administer medication
    • Administer first aid
    • Take photographs of any children
    • Be involved in looking at a child’s learning and development log, but can contribute to it
    • Have access to children’s personal details and records.
  • While adhering to the above list, we recognise that it is vital that the staff member awaiting an enhanced disclosure is made to feel part of the team and we support them in participating fully in every other aspect of the nursery day.

 

  1. Ongoing support and checks
  • All staff are responsible for notifying the manager in person if there are any changes to their circumstances that may affect their suitability to work with children (staff suitability status will also be checked through an annual ‘staff suitability questionnaire’). This includes any incidents occurring outside the nursery. Staff will face disciplinary action should they fail to notify the manager immediately
  • We act on any information that comes to our attention that suggests someone may no longer be suitable for their role
  • All members of staff will update a health questionnaire on an annual basis to ensure management have a good knowledge of any changes that may require support or additional resources to aid them to carry out their day-to-day duties. This will also be discussed at staff supervisions and review meetings. Management may require this more regularly where health circumstances change. There are more details about how the nursery deals with any health problems in the Absence management procedure
  • The nursery manager*/owner* will review any significant changes to an individual’s circumstances that may suggest they are no longer suitable to work with children and take appropriate action to ensure any unsuitable or potentially unsuitable employee does not have unsupervised contact with children until the matter is resolved. Please see the Disciplinary procedure for further details
  • Every member of staff will have two meetings a year with the manager: a formal appraisal and a more informal review. This will provide an opportunity for the manager and member of staff to discuss training needs for the following six months as well as evaluate and discuss their performance in the previous six months
  • The manager, deputy and room leaders will be responsible for any support the staff team may have between these reviews. This includes mentor support, one-to-one training sessions, ongoing supervision, work-based observations and constructive feedback.
  • We will ensure staff receive continuous support, training and supervision from management in order to provide a safe, secure and healthy environment for all children in the nursery
  • The nursery will provide appropriate opportunities for all staff to undertake professional development and training to help improve the quality of experiences provided for children.

 

 

  1. Students and agency/supply staff
  • All students will receive an interview to ensure they are suitable for the nursery and an induction process to ensure they fully understand and are able to implement the nursery procedures, working practices and values
  • All students will be fully supervised to ensure they receive the appropriate support, training and information they may require
  • We request confirmation that all necessary checks have been completed by the agency before using any supply or agency staff. Once checks are obtained we record the DBS check reference number, the date the check was obtained and details of who obtained it
  • We have a short induction prior to agency staff working with the children. It is our policy that all agency and supply staff are fully supervised and not left alone with children.

 

 

Safety Checks

At ABC Wonderland we take reasonable steps to ensure the safety of children, staff and others on the premises including carrying out safety checks on a regular basis in accordance with the timescales set out in the nursery checklists table at the end of this policy.

 

These include daily safety checks of the premises, indoors and outdoors, and all equipment and resources before the children access any of the areas. The checks are recorded and show any issues and solutions.

 

All staff are trained in health and safety to raise awareness. Staff know how to recognise potential hazards, including near misses in the nursery environment and monitor safety at all times.

 

Risk assessments (refer to the Overall approach to risk assessments policy)

Risk assessments document the hazard, who could be harmed, existing controls, the seriousness of the risk or potential injury, any further action needed to control the risk, who is responsible for what action, when and how often will the action be undertaken, and how will this be monitored and checked and by whom.

 

The nursery carries out written risk assessments at least annually. These are regularly reviewed and cover potential risks to children, staff and visitors at the nursery. When circumstances change in the nursery, e.g. a significant piece of equipment is introduced or new activity or experience planned, we review our current risk assessment or conduct a new risk assessment dependent on the nature of this change.

 

All staff are trained in the risk assessment process to ensure understanding and compliance of how they manage risks.

 

All outings away from the nursery are individually risk assessed. For more details refer to the Visits and outings policy.

Electrical equipment

 

  • All electrical cables are kept out of the reach of children wherever possible and shielded by furniture where they need to be at floor level
  • We take a risk-based approach, considering the type of equipment and what it is being used for, to make a decision whether to have certain electrical items Portable appliance testing (PAT) tested (as per HSE guidance)
  • Electrical sockets are all risk assessed and any appropriate safety measures are in place to ensure the safety of the children.

 

 

Dangerous substances

All dangerous substances including chemicals are kept in locked areas out of children’s reach. All substances are kept in their original containers with their original labels attached. Safety data sheets (Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (COSHH)) and risk assessments are kept for all substances and the appropriate personal protection taken and used e.g. gloves, apron and goggles.

 

Hot drinks and food

Hot drinks must only be consumed in the staff room. No bottled or canned drinks, sweets or crisps are to be kept or consumed in the nursery rooms or outside.

 

Transport and outings

The nursery has a comprehensive documented policy relating to outings, which incorporates all aspects of health and safety procedures including the arrangements for transporting and the supervision of children when away from the nursery.

 

Room temperatures

  • Staff should be aware of room temperatures in the nursery, ensure that they are suitable at all times and recorded on the appropriate sheet. There is a thermometer in each room to ensure this is monitored
  • Staff must always be aware of the dangers of babies and young children being too warm or too cold
  • Temperatures should not fall below 18°C in the baby rooms and 16°C in all other areas
  • Where fans are being used to cool rooms, great care must be taken with regard to their positioning.

 

Water supplies

  • A fresh water drinking supply is available and accessible to all children, staff and visitors
  • All hot water taps accessible to children are thermostatically controlled to ensure that the temperature of the water does not exceed 40°C.

 

Gas appliances

  • All gas appliances are checked annually by a registered Gas Safety Register engineer
  • Carbon monoxide detectors are fitted.

Outings Policy

At ABC Wonderland we take the children to outings to the woods or beach. In order to keep children safe and secure during this transition we will abide by the following procedures:

  • A full risk assessment is always being carried out by a senior member of staff to assess the risks or hazards which may arise for the children, and identify steps to be taken to remove, minimise and manage those risks and hazards
  • The risk assessment is based on the usual route and an alternative route in case the usual route is inaccessible
  • Written permission is obtained from parents for the outgings
  • The staff have a register which is completed on collection of the children and again once they have returned to the setting
  • Children are paired up to walk back to the setting
  • Head counts take place periodically during the walk back to the setting, the frequency is decided in the risk assessment
  • We provide appropriate staffing levels the safety and the individual needs of the children
  • All parent and staff emergency contact numbers will be taken on trips
  • All staff will be easily recognisable by other members of the group; they will wear the nursery uniform and high visibility vests or jackets
  • At least one member of staff will hold a valid and current full paediatric first aid certificate and this will be increased where risk assessment of proposed activity deems it necessary
  • A fully stocked first aid box will always be taken along with any special medication or equipment required
  • A fully charged nursery mobile phone will be taken as a means of emergency contact, (staff are reminded of the mobile phone policy and asked to leave personal phones at the setting)
  • In the event of an accident, staff will assess the situation. In the event of a serious accident an ambulance will be called to the scene, and parents will be contacted. One member of staff will accompany the child to the hospital, and the rest of the group will return to the nursery
  • The Safeguarding children and child protection policy will be followed at all times including the procedure to follow in the case of a disclosure during the journey to the setting.

 

Risk assessment

The full risk assessment is displayed for parents to see before giving consent. The plan includes the following details:

  • The name of the designated person in charge
  • The estimated time of departure from the setting, arrival at the school at expected arrival back to the nursery
  • The number of children, age range, ratio of staff to children, children’s individual needs and the group size
  • The equipment needed, i.e. first aid kit, mobile phone
  • Staff emergency contact numbers
  • Method of transportation and travel arrangements (including the route)
  • Emergency procedures
  • Weather conditions and any alterative arrangements needed, e.g. in snow, hot weather
  • The name of the designated first aider and the first aid provision.

Use of vehicles for school pick ups

  • The arrangements for transporting children are always carefully planned and where necessary additional people will be recruited to ensure the safety of the children. This is particularly important where children with disabilities are concerned
  • All vehicles used in transporting children are properly licensed, inspected and maintained
  • Regular checks are made to the nursery vehicle e.g. tyres, lights etc. and a logbook of maintenance, repairs and services is maintained
  • The nursery vehicle is kept in proper working order, fully insured for business use and protected by comprehensive breakdown cover
  • Drivers of vehicles are adequately insured
  • All vehicles used are fitted to the supplier’s instructions with sufficient numbers of safety restraints appropriate to the age and/or weight of the children carried in the vehicle
  • The *minibus is fitted with 3-point seat belts
  • Seat belts and child seats are used where required
  • The maximum seating is not exceeded
  • When we use a minibus, we check that the driver is over 21 years of age and holds a Passenger Carrying Vehicle (PCV) driving licence. This entitles the driver to transport up to 16 passengers
  • When children are being transported, we maintain ratios at all times
  • No child is left in a vehicle unattended
  • Extra care is taken when getting into or out of a vehicle
  • The vehicle is equipped with a fire extinguisher and emergency kit containing warning triangle, torch, blankets, wheel changing equipment etc.

 

Missing child

In the event of a child going missing, the Missing child from outings procedure will be followed. Any incidents or accidents will be recorded in writing and Ofsted will be contacted and informed of any incidents.

If a child runs off or leaves the main group for any reason a staff member will only follow if the safety of the other children in the group is not compromised. If the staff are unable to follow or catch up with the child, then the police will be called immediately, followed by the child’s emergency contacts. The main nursery will be contacted following this and asked to assist where possible.

 

The safety of all children is paramount at all times. Ofsted will be contacted and informed of any incidents.

Settling In Policy

At ABC Wonderland our aim is to work in partnership with parents to help them become familiar with the setting and offer a settled relationship for the child. We know children learn best when they are healthy, safe and secure, we build positive relationships with parents to ensure we can meet children’s individual needs and help them settle quickly into nursery life.

 

All our staff know about the importance of building strong attachments with children. They are trained to recognise the different stages of attachment and use this knowledge to support children and families settling into the nursery.

 

Our settling in procedure includes:

  • Allocating a key person to each child and his/her family, before he/she starts to attend. The key person welcomes and looks after the child, ensuring that their care is tailored to meet their individual needs. He/she offers a settled relationship for the child and builds a relationship with his/her parents during the settling in period and throughout his/her time at the nursery, to ensure the family has a familiar contact person to assist with the settling in process
  • Reviewing the nominated key person if the child is bonding with another member of staff to ensure the child’s needs are supported
  • Providing parents with relevant information about the policies and procedures of the nursery
  • Working with parents to gather information before the child starts on the child’s interests, likes and dislikes and their favourite things available at settling sessions, e.g. their favourite story or resource, as well as completing a baseline of the child’s current development to plan, and meet, the individual needs of the child from the first day
  • Encouraging parents and children to visit the nursery before an admission is planned and arranging home visits and/or online video meetings where applicable
  • Planning tailored settling in visits and introductory sessions, following any necessary government advice
  • Welcoming parents to stay with their child, where possible and applicable during the first few weeks until the child feels settled and the parents feel comfortable about leaving their child. Settling in visits and introductory sessions are key to a smooth transition and to ensure good communication and information sharing between staff and parents
  • Encouraging parents to send in family photos to display to help settle the child
  • Creating photo books of the setting including photos of staff for the child to take home and share with their parent and become familiar with the staff and new environment
  • Reassuring parents whose children seem to be take a little longer to settle in and developing a plan with them, for example shorter days, where possible
  • Providing regular updates and photos of the children settling
  • Encouraging parents, where appropriate, to separate themselves from their children for brief periods at first, gradually building up to longer absences
  • Assigning a buddy or back-up key person to each child in case the key person is not available. Parents are made aware of this to support the settling process and attachment
  • Respecting the circumstances of all families, including those who are unable to stay for long periods of time in the nursery and reassure them of their child’s progress towards settling in
  • Not taking a child on an outing from the nursery until he/she is completely settled.

 

 

Sickness and Illness Policy

At ABC Wonderland we promote the good health of all children attending including oral health by:

  • Asking parents to keep children at home if they are unwell. If a child is unwell, it is in their best interest to be in a home environment rather than at nursery with their peers
  • Asking staff and other visitors not to attend the setting if they are unwell
  • Helping children to keep healthy by providing balanced and nutritious snacks, meals and drinks
  • Minimising infection through our rigorous cleaning and hand washing processes (see Infection control policy)
  • Ensuring children have regular access to the outdoors and having good ventilation inside
  • Sharing information with parents about the importance of the vaccination programme for young children to help protect them and the wider society from communicable diseases
  • Sharing information from the Department of Health that all children aged 6 months – 5 years should take a daily vitamin
  • Having areas for rest and sleep, where required and sharing information about the importance of sleep and how many hours young children should be having.

 

Our procedures

In order to take appropriate action of children who become ill and to minimise the spread of infection we implement the following procedures:

  • If a child becomes ill during the nursery day, we contact their parent(s) and ask them to pick up their child as soon as possible. During this time we care for the child in a quiet, calm area with their key person (wearing PPE), wherever possible
  • We follow the guidance published by UK Health Security Agency for managing specific infectious diseases[1] and advice from our local health protection unit on exclusion times for specific illnesses, e.g. sickness and diarrhoea, measles and chicken pox, to protect other children in the nursery
  • Should a child have an infectious disease, such as sickness and diarrhoea, they must not return to nursery until they have been clear for at least 48 hours
  • We inform all parents if there is a contagious infection identified in the nursery, to enable them to spot the early signs of this illness. We thoroughly clean and sterilise all equipment and resources that may have come into contact with a contagious child to reduce the spread of infection
  • We notify Ofsted as soon as is reasonably practical, but in any event within 14 days of the incident of any food poisoning affecting two or more children cared for on the premises
  • We ask parents to keep children on antibiotics at home for the first 48 hours of the course (unless this is part of an ongoing care plan to treat individual medical conditions e.g. asthma and the child is not unwell). This is because it is important that children are not subjected to the rigours of the nursery day, which requires socialising with other children and being part of a group setting, when they have first become ill and require a course of antibiotics
  • We have the right to refuse admission to a child who is unwell. This decision will be taken by the manager on duty and is non-negotiable
  • We make information and posters about head lice readily available and all parents are requested to regularly check their children’s hair. If a parent finds that their child has head lice, we would be grateful if they could inform the nursery so that other parents can be alerted to check their child’s hair.

 

Meningitis procedure

If a parent informs the nursery that their child has meningitis, the nursery manager will contact the Local Area Infection Control (IC) Nurse. The IC Nurse will give guidance and support in each individual case. If parents do not inform the nursery, we may be contacted directly by the IC Nurse and the appropriate support given. We will follow all guidance given and notify any of the appropriate authorities including Ofsted where necessary.

 

We will follow the transporting children to hospital procedure in any cases where children may need hospital treatment.

The nursery manager or selected staff member must:

  • Inform a member of the management team immediately
  • Call 999 for an ambulance immediately if the illness is severe. DO NOT attempt to transport the unwell child in your own vehicle**
  • Follow the instructions from the 999 call handler
  • Whilst waiting for the ambulance, a member of staff must contact the parent(s) and arrange to meet them at the hospital
  • Redeploy staff if necessary to ensure there is adequate staff deployment to care for the remaining children. This may mean temporarily grouping the children together
  • Arrange for the most appropriate member of staff to accompany the child taking with them any relevant information such as registration forms, relevant medication sheets, medication and the child’s comforter
  • Remain calm at all times. Children who witness an incident may well be affected by it and may need lots of cuddles and reassurance. Staff may also require additional support following the accident.

 

 

This policy will be reviewed at least annually in consultation with staff and parents and/or after a significant incident, e.g. serious illness and/or hospital visit required.

 

 

[1] https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/health-protection-in-schools-and-other-childcare-facilities/managing-specific-infectious-diseases-a-to-z

Sleep Policy

At ABC Wonderland we aim to ensure that all children have enough sleep to support their development and natural sleeping rhythms in a safe environment.

 

The safety of babies sleeping is paramount. Our policy follows the advice provided by The Cot Death Society and Lullaby Trust to minimise the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). We make sure that:

  • Babies are placed on their backs to sleep. If a baby has rolled onto their tummy, we turn them onto their back again unless they are able to roll from back to front and back again, on their own, in which case we enable them to find their own position
  • Babies and toddlers are never put down to sleep with a bottle to self-feed
  • Babies and toddlers are monitored visually when sleeping looking for the rise and fall of the chest and if the sleep position has changed
  • Checks are recorded every 10 minutes and as good practice we monitor babies under six months or a new baby sleeping during the first few weeks every five minutes until we are familiar with the child and their sleeping routines, to offer reassurance to them and families
  • Babies and children are never left to sleep in a separate sleep room without staff supervision at all times.

 

We provide a safe sleeping environment by:

  • Monitoring the room temperature
  • Using clean, light bedding or blankets and ensuring babies are appropriately dressed for sleep to avoid overheating
  • Only using safety-approved cots and other suitable sleeping equipment (i.e. mats) that are compliant with British Standard regulations
  • Using a firm and flat mattress and waterproof mattress covers in conjunction with a clean fitted sheet
  • Only letting babies sleep in prams if they lie flat and we have written permission from the parent
  • Enabling babies to sleep outdoors, where appropriate and with parent permission
  • Not using cot bumpers or cluttering cots with soft toys, although comforters may be given where required
  • Keeping all spaces around cots and beds clear from hanging objects i.e. hanging cords, blind cords, drawstring bags
  • Ensuring every baby and toddler is provided with clean bedding labelled for them and working in partnership with parents to meet any individual needs e.g. if a child prefers to sleep in a sleeping bag, we will ask parents to bring one from home
  • Cleaning all bedding as required and at least weekly
  • Transferring any baby who falls asleep while being nursed by a practitioner to a safe sleeping surface to complete their rest
  • Having a No smoking/vaping policy.

 

We ask parents to complete forms on their child’s sleeping routine with the child’s key person when the child starts at nursery and these are reviewed and updated at timely intervals. If a baby has an unusual sleeping routine or a position that we do not use in the nursery i.e. babies sleeping on their tummies or in a sling, we will explain our policy to the parents and not usually offer this unless the baby’s doctor has advised the parent of a medical reason to do so. In such cases, we would ask parents to sign to say they have requested we adopt a different position or pattern on the sleeping babies form.

 

We recognise parent knowledge of their child with regard to sleep routines and will, where possible, work together to ensure each child’s individual sleep routines and well-being continues to be met. However, staff will not force a child to sleep or keep them awake against his or her will. They will also not usually wake children from their sleep.

 

Individual sleep routines are followed rather than one set sleep time for all children. We create an environment that helps to settle children that require a sleep, for example dimming the lights or using soft music, where applicable.  We will maintain the needs of the children that do not require a sleep and ensure they can continue to play, learn and develop. This may involve taking children outdoors or linking with other rooms or groups of children.

 

Staff will discuss with parents any changes in sleep routines at the end of the day and share observations and information about children’s behaviour if they do not receive enough sleep.

 

Sleeping twins

We follow the advice from The Lullaby Trust regarding sleeping twins while working with parents to maintain sleep routines and well-being.

 

Further information can be found at: http://www.lullabytrust.org.uk

Social Networking Policy

Social media is a large part of the world we live in and as such at ABC Wonderland we need to make sure we protect our children by having procedures in place to ensure the safe use.

 

We use *Facebook and Instagram to share posts, pictures and videos of the experiences and activities the children have accessed at nursery, as well as to post updates, reminders and links to best practice.

 

In order to safeguard children we ensure:

  • We will obtain prior written permission in place from parents before posting any images of children, however ABC Wonderland decided that all children’s face will be covered to protect the children and their families
  • Only the designated person or management can post on our social media pages
  • We have a closed page which only parents and others who have been invited to join the group can view and comment on the posts
  • * We have separate permission to use any images for any open public pages that we use for marketing purposes
  • We monitor comments on all posts and address any concerns immediately.

 

Staff use of social media

We require our staff to be responsible and professional in their use of social networking sites in relation to any connection to the nursery, nursery staff, parents or children.

  • When using social networking sites such as Facebook or Instagram we ask staff:
    • Not to name the setting they work at
    • Not to make comments relating to their work or post pictures in work uniform
    • Not to send private messages to any parents or family members
    • To direct any parent questions relating to work via social networking sites, to the manager
    • To ensure any posts reflect their professional role in the community (e.g. no inappropriate social event photos or inappropriate comments i.e. foul language)
    • To report any concerning comments or questions from parents to the manager or designated safeguarding lead
    • To follow the Staff behaviour policy
    • Not to post anything that could be construed to have any impact on the nursery’s reputation or relate to the nursery or any children attending the nursery in any way
    • To follow this in conjunction with the Whistleblowing policy.
  • If any of the above points are not followed then the member of staff involved will face disciplinary action, which could result in dismissal.

All electronic communications between staff and parents should be professional and take place via the official nursery communication channels, e.g. work emails and phone numbers. This is to protect staff, children and parents.

 

Parents’ and visitors’ use of social networking

We promote the safety and welfare of all staff and children and therefore ask parents and visitors not to post, publicly or privately, information about any child on social media sites such as Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. We ask all parents and visitors to follow this policy to ensure that information about children, images and information do not fall into the wrong hands.

 

We ask parents not to:

  • Send friend requests to any member of nursery staff*
  • Screen shot or share any posts or pictures from the nursery on social media platforms (these may contain other children in the pictures)
  • Post any photographs to social media that have been supplied by the nursery with other children in them (e.g. Christmas concert photographs or photographs from an activity at nursery).

 

We ask parents to:

  • Share any concerns regarding inappropriate use of social media through the official procedures (please refer to the Parents as partners policy, Complaints and compliments policy).

 

Special Educational Needs and Disabilities (SEND) Policy

This policy has been created with regard to:

  • The SEND Code of Practice 2015
  • Children and Families Act 2014 (Part 3)
  • Equality Act 2010
  • Working Together to Safeguard Children (2018)
  • Statutory Framework for the EYFS (2021)

 

Special Educational Needs and Disability (SEND) code of practice

The nursery has regard to the statutory guidance set out in the Special Educational Needs and Disability code of practice (DfE 2015) to identify, assess and make provision for children’s special educational needs.

 

At ABC Wonderland we use the SEND Code of Practice (2015) definition of Special Educational Needs and Disability:

 

A child or young person has SEN if they have a learning difficulty or disability which calls for special educational provision to be made for him or her.

 

A child of compulsory school age or a young person has a learning difficulty or disability if he or she:

  • Has a significantly greater difficulty in learning than the majority of others of the same age, or
  • Has a disability which prevents or hinders him or her from making use of facilities of a kind generally provided for others of the same age…

 

Statement of intent

We are committed to the inclusion of all children at our nursery. We ensure all children are cared for and educated to develop to their full potential alongside their peers through positive experiences. We enable them to share opportunities and experiences and develop and learn from each other. We provide a positive and welcoming environment where children are supported according to their individual needs and we work hard to ensure no child is discriminated against or put at a disadvantage as a consequence of their needs. Each child’s needs are unique and we do not attempt to categorise children.

 

We are committed to working in partnership with parents in order to meet each child’s individual needs and develop to their full potential. We are committed to working with any child who has a special educational need and/or disability and making reasonable adjustments to enable every child to make full use of the nursery’s facilities. All children have a right to a broad and well-balanced early learning environment.

 

We undertake a Progress Check of all children at age two in accordance with the Code of Practice (2015) and statutory framework for the EYFS to support early identification of needs.

 

We will also undertake an assessment at the end of the Early Years Foundation Stage for any children that remain with us in the final term of the year in which they turn five, as per the statutory framework for the EYFS.

 

We will work closely with the child’s parents and any relevant professionals if we identify any areas where a child’s progress is less than expected to establish if any additional action is required. This may include:

 

  • Liaising with any professional agencies
  • Reading any reports that have been prepared
  • Attending any review meetings with the local authority and other professionals
  • Observing each child’s development and assessing such observations regularly to monitor progress.

 

All new children will be given a full settling in period when joining the nursery according to their individual needs.

 

We will:

  • Recognise each child’s individual needs and ensure all staff are aware of, and have regard for, the Special Educational Needs Code of Practice (2015)
  • Ensure that all children are treated as individuals and are supported to take part in every aspect of the nursery day according to their individual needs and abilities
  • Include all children and their families in our provision
  • Identify the specific needs of children with special educational needs and/or disabilities and meet those needs through a range of strategies
  • Ensure that children who learn at an accelerated pace e.g. ’more able’ are also supported (see the More able and talented children policy)
  • Encourage children to value and respect others
  • Provide well informed and suitably trained practitioners to help support parents and children with special educational difficulties and/or disabilities
  • Develop and maintain a core team of staff who are experienced in the care of children with additional needs and identify a Special Educational Needs and Disabilities Co-ordinator (SENCo) who is experienced in the care and assessment of children with additional needs.  Staff will be provided with specific training relating to SEND and the SEND Code of Practice
  • Monitor and review our practice and provision and, if necessary, make adjustments, and seek specialist equipment and services where required
  • Challenge inappropriate attitudes and practices
  • Promote positive images and role models during play experiences of those with additional needs wherever possible
  • Celebrate diversity in all aspects of play and learning
  • Work in partnership with parents and other agencies in order to meet individual children’s needs, including the education, health and care authorities, and seek advice, support and training where required
  • Share any statutory and other assessments made by the nursery with parents and support parents in seeking any help they or the child may need.

Our nursery Special Education Needs and Disabilities Co-ordinator (SENCo) is Alex Ataide

 

The role of the SENCo in our setting includes:

  • Ensuring all practitioners in the setting understand their responsibilities to children with SEND and the setting’s approach to identifying and meeting SEND
  • Advising and supporting colleagues
  • Ensuring parents are closely involved throughout and that their insights inform action taken by the setting
  • Liaising with professionals or agencies beyond the setting
  • Taking the lead in implementing the graduated response approach and supporting colleagues through each stage of the process.

 

We will:

  • Designate a named member of staff to be the SENCo and share their name and role with all staff and parents
  • Have high aspirations for all children and support them to achieve their full potential
  • Develop respectful partnerships with parents and families
  • Ensure parents are involved at all stages of the assessment, planning, provision and review of their child’s care and education and include the thoughts and feelings voiced by the child, where possible
  • Signpost parents and families to our Local Offer in order to access local support and services
  • Undertake formal Progress Checks and assessments of all children in accordance with the SEND Code of Practice January (2015) and statutory framework for the EYFS (2021)
  • Provide a statement showing how we provide for children with special educational needs and/or disabilities and share this with staff, parents and other professionals
  • Ensure that the provision for children with SEN and/or disabilities is the responsibility of all members of staff in the nursery through training and professional discussions
  • Set out in our inclusive admissions practice on how we meet equality of access and opportunity
  • Make reasonable adjustments to our physical environment to ensure it is, as far as possible suitable for children and adults with disabilities using the facilities
  • Provide a broad, balanced, aspirational early learning environment for all children with SEN and/or disabilities and differentiated activities to meet all individual needs and abilities
  • Liaise with other professionals involved with children with special educational needs and/or disabilities and their families, including transition arrangements to other settings and schools (see our Transitions policy)
  • Use the graduated approach response system to assess, plan, do and review to ensure early identification of any SEND
  • Ensure that children with special educational needs and/or disabilities and their parents are consulted at all stages of the graduated response, taking into account their levels of ability
  • Review children’s progress and support plans every 4/6 weeks and work with parents to agree on further support plans
  • Provide privacy of children with special educational needs and/or disabilities when intimate care is being provided
  • Raise awareness of any specialism the setting has to offer e.g. Makaton trained staff
  • Ensure the effectiveness of our SEN and disability provision by collecting information from a range of sources e.g. additional support reviews, Education, Health and Care (EHC) plans, staff and management meetings, parental and external agencies’ views, inspections and complaints. This information is collated, evaluated and reviewed annually
  • Provide a complaints procedure and make available to all parents in a format that meets their needs e.g. Braille, audio, large print, additional languages
  • Monitor and review our policy and procedures annually.

 

Effective assessment of the need for early help

We are aware of the process for early help and adhere to the following procedure:

 

Local agencies should work together to put processes in place for the effective assessment of the needs of individual children who may benefit from early help services. Children and families may need support from a wide range of local agencies. Where a child and family would benefit from coordinated support from more than one agency (e.g. education, health, housing, police) there should be an inter-agency assessment. These early help assessments should identify what help the child and family require to prevent needs escalating to a point where intervention would be needed via a statutory assessment under the Children Act 1989.

 

The early help assessment should be undertaken by a lead professional who should provide support to the child and family, act as an advocate on their behalf and coordinate the delivery of support services. The lead professional role could be undertaken by a General Practitioner (GP), family support worker, teacher, health visitor and/or special educational needs coordinator. Decisions about who should be the lead professional should be taken on a case-by-case basis and should be informed by the child and their family.

 

For an early help assessment to be effective:

  • The assessment should be undertaken with the agreement of the child and their parents. It should involve the child and family as well as all the professionals who are working with them
  • A teacher, GP, health visitor, early years worker or other professional should be able to discuss concerns they may have about a child and family with a social worker in the local authority. Local authority children’s social care should set out the process for how this will happen
  • If parents and/or the child do not consent to an early help assessment, then the lead professional should make a judgement as to whether, without help, the needs of the child will escalate. If so, a referral into local authority children’s social care may be necessary.

 

If at any time it is considered that the child may be a child in need as defined in the Children Act 1989, or that the child has suffered significant harm, or is likely to do so, a referral should be made immediately to local authority children’s social care. This referral can be made by any professional (Working together to safeguard children 2018).

Graduated response approach

We follow the SEND Code of Practice (2015) recommendation that, in addition to the formal checks above, we adopt a graduated approach to assessment and planning, led and coordinated by a SENCO. Good practice of working together with parents, and the observation and monitoring of children’s individual progress, will help identify any child with special educational needs or disability. This graduated approach will be led and coordinated by our SENCO and appropriate records will be kept according to the Code of Practice.

 

Assess

In identifying a child as needing SEND support, the key person, working with the SENCO and the child’s parents, will carry out an analysis of the child’s needs. This initial assessment will be reviewed regularly to ensure that support is matched to need. Where there is little or no improvement in the child’s progress, more specialist assessment may be called for from specialist teachers or from health, social services or other agencies beyond the setting. Where professionals are not already working with the setting, the SENCO will contact them, with the parents’ agreement.

 

Plan

Where it is decided to provide SEND support, and having formally notified the parents, the key person and the SENCO, in consultation with the parents, will agree the outcomes they are seeking, the interventions and support to be put in place, the expected impact on progress, development or behaviour, and a clear date for review. Plans will take into account the views of the child.

 

The support and intervention provided will be selected to meet the outcomes identified for the child, based on reliable evidence of effectiveness, and provided by practitioners with relevant skills and knowledge. Any related staff development needs are identified and addressed. Parents will be involved in planning support and, where appropriate, in reinforcing the provision or contributing to progress at home.

 

Do

The child’s key person will be responsible for working with the child on a daily basis. With support from the SENCO, they will oversee the implementation of the intervention agreed as part of SEN support. The SENCO will support the key person in assessing the child’s response to the action taken, in problem solving and advising on the effective implementation of support.

 

Review

The effectiveness of the support and its impact on the child’s progress will be reviewed in line with the agreed date. The impact and quality of the support will be evaluated by the key person and the SENCO in full consultation with the child’s parents and taking into account the child’s views. Information will be shared with parents about the impact of the support provided.

 

 

 

Education and Health Care Plan (EHCP)

Some children and young people may require an EHC needs assessment in order to decide whether it is necessary to develop an EHC plan. The purpose of an EHC plan is to make adjustments and offer support to meet the special educational needs of the child, to secure the best possible outcomes for them across education, health and social care.

 

The local authority will conduct the EHC needs assessment and take into account a wide range of evidence, including:

  • Evidence of the child’s developmental milestones and rate of progress
  • Information about the nature, extent and context of the child’s SEND
  • Evidence of the action already being taken by us as the early years provider to meet the child’s SEND needs
  • Evidence that, where progress has been made, it has only been as the result of much additional intervention and support over and above that which is usually provided
  • Evidence of the child’s physical, emotional and social development and health needs, drawing on relevant evidence from clinicians and other health professionals and what has been done to meet these by other agencies.

 

We will then work with the local authority and other agencies to ensure that the child receives the support they need to gain the best outcomes.

 

We will review this policy annually to ensure it continues to meet the needs of the children, parents and our nursery.

 

 

Staff Well-being Policy

At ABC Wonderland we promote the good health and well-being of all our staff. As a nursery, we endeavour to support staff well-being, not only to ensure that children receive high quality care, but also to ensure our employees feel supported and cared for, as part of a team.

 

Mental ill-health is usually caused by a combination of work and non-work related factors. There is a myriad of reasons for mental ill-health, from the pressure of ongoing change at work to longer or more intense hours exacerbated by financial pressures at home, or relationship problems and greater caring responsibilities. Striking the balance between what is considered appropriate results, or output, and robust mental health is tricky. We are committed to constantly upskilling ourselves so that we know about how to create and maintain conditions that support and encourage good mental health, as well as recognise the signs of mental ill health and provide appropriate support.

 

We recognise the importance of safeguarding the mental health of all of our employees, by providing a happy and nurturing working environment. With statistics in the UK showing that each week 1 in 6 of us experiences a common mental health problem, we are committed to acknowledging and supporting our staff’s physical and emotional needs.

 

Our ethos

We know that the care and education of babies and young children is highly rewarding. However, we are also aware of the day-to-day demands and pressures of modern life such as family life, financial worries, health concerns and work-life balance and how these pressures, alongside the role of providing high quality care and education to babies and young children, can place a high level of demand on all of our employees.

 

In order to support our staff team, the management team put procedures in place that ensure staff well-being remains one of the key focuses of our practice. In doing this, we aim to provide our team with a safe, inclusive and nurturing working environment that acknowledges their needs, not just within the workplace but as a whole person.

 

Alex Ataide is the named member of staff who leads our setting’s well-being practice. They offer support on staff well-being and know where to access external support.

 

Alex Ataide is also committed to keeping their well-being and mental health knowledge up-to-date and is responsible for reviewing our practices, supporting the developing knowledge of the whole staff team, to ensure we are implementing the necessary strategies to safeguard the well-being of our staff.

 

 

 

Procedures to minimise work related stress:

  • Complete a written stress risk assessment to identify and manage work-related stress related to demands, control, support, relationships, role and change (see Health and Safety Executive advice[1])
  • To ensure staff are supported within the setting, new staff will receive a full induction, so they feel competent and capable to carry out their role and responsibilities
  • Staff will receive ongoing training, coaching and mentoring to ensure that they are supported to feel confident in their role and to minimise stress within the workplace
  • Regular supervisions take place every 3 months in which staff well-being is discussed and recorded
  • Practitioners are respected and valued in their work, whatever their role. Tasks are shared out appropriately according to their role and level of responsibility, the workload is monitored and reviewed on a regular basis
  • Staff are encouraged to have a healthy work-life balance; this is supported by ensuring the workload is monitored so that it is not necessary for staff to work outside of their scheduled hours. All contributions to work are valued and celebrated
  • We carefully review our expectations around the amount of paperwork that staff must complete, including observations and assessments of children. We work as a team to ensure all record keeping is meaningful and kept to an appropriate level so as not to add undue pressure to staff members
  • We work hard to maintain a reflective culture within the setting that encourages feedback from staff about management procedures and working relationships. This reflective culture supports an environment of teamwork, facilitating the involvement of every member of staff in the practice of our setting
  • Staff are encouraged to take their required breaks at appropriate intervals to ensure they have time to rest and recuperate, with time away from busy rooms
  • The nursery manager and well-being representative are available for staff to come and discuss any issues or concerns
  • The nursery ensures that confidential conversations take place in private, away from other staff members and children
  • All information remains confidential or on a need to know basis to support the facilitation of open and honest conversations. However, where the manager or the well-being representative feels there is a question around the safety of the staff member, they will refer to outside agencies for support and guidance. These measures will be discussed in a sensitive and understanding manner with the staff member, as appropriate
  • We actively promote a culture of mutual respect, tolerance and cooperation tolerance, in line with the British values
  • Team meetings are facilitated to support with team development, to raise awareness of mental health and well-being by engaging staff in conversations about how the setting maintains a supportive environment
  • We promote a culture that supports any staff member who is experiencing a mental health related illness to discuss this and reasonable adjustments will be made to support any staff experiencing stress and any mental health issues
  • If the nursery is made aware of any member of staff who requires support, a plan for more regular support sessions and adjustments to their working day will be discussed and decided in partnership with the staff member. This plan will be reviewed regularly and adapted to ensure it is a relevant and appropriate (see Supporting staff members individually section)
  • If adjustments are unable to meet the needs of the member of staff or the nursery, then further advice support will be sought
  • Staff well-being and staff self-care information is available within designated staff areas
  • Leaders and managers support practitioners in a safe culture where bullying, harassment and discrimination is not tolerated, along with a culture that challenges and deals with any inappropriate behaviour in a timely manner.

 

Supporting staff members individually

We include well-being as part of our discussions at staff supervision sessions and appraisals. During these sessions, we work with staff on an individual basis, and have well-being discussions to ascertain any individual well-being needs. Where the manager and staff member feel it is appropriate, they will draw up an individual action plan, including reviewing workload and any stress triggers. With the needs of the nursery also in mind, reasonable adjustments will be made for the member of staff; this could include flexible working agreements, changes in environment, adjustments to jobs role and responsibilities, more frequent breaks, a working buddy, or any other appropriate measure that it is felt could be helpful.

 

If a member of staff is returning to work after a period of absence, a back to work interview is carried out as per our Absence management procedure.

 

We follow all statutory guidance on the safeguarding of our workforce and as stated, if the manager is concerned about the safety of a member of staff, we will work with the Designated Safeguarding Lead to ask for support from the appropriate external agencies; this is to ensure the continued safety of our workforce at all times.

 

 

 

[1] https://www.hse.gov.uk/stress/risk-assessment.htm

Student Policy

At ABC Wonderland we are committed to sharing good practice with those wishing to pursue a career in childcare. We welcome students to join our staff team and gain work experience within our nursery. We will accept 2 student(s) at a time as more students than this places undue pressure on staff. We do, however, accept small groups or occasional placements when research or studies are being carried out that will be of benefit to childcare.

 

We will only offer placements to students who are associated with a recognised child-related course, or on occasions, pupils from local secondary schools on work experience. We offer placements only after discussions with the appropriate tutors and the establishment of close links with the college, training provider or school.

 

We expect all students to visit the nursery for an interview, followed by their student induction and nursery tour. At this time, students will have the opportunity to read and discuss relevant health and safety policies, receive a copy of the Student Handbook and sign their contract in readiness for their first day.

 

Our policy for those on placements is as follows:

  • All students will have an enhanced Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) check before their placement begins
  • All students are assigned to a senior member of staff who will supervise their work and explain the health, safety and fire requirements of the nursery
  • Students will be supervised at all times by the member of staff assigned to them and will not be left alone with the children. They may only change nappies if the manager is satisfied they are competent, responsible and know the children well enough and always under close supervision
  • Students will be supported to understand nursery policies and procedures including Safeguarding children and child protection policy, Health and safety – general policy, Inclusion and equality policy, Anti-Bribery policy and Whistleblowing policy
  • All students are required to maintain our Data protection and confidentiality policy
  • It is expected that during the student’s placement, their tutor will visit the nursery or have verbal communication with the Student Co-ordinator to receive feedback about the student’s progress
  • Students will be offered support and guidance throughout their placement and given constructive, honest feedback in respect of their performance. Staff will respect individual students’ needs and abilities
  • An accurate evaluation of ability and performance for both students and training providers will be provided and the nursery will support students who are experiencing difficulties with action plans if needed
  • To maintain parent partnerships, parents will be informed when students are present in the nursery e.g. via the parent noticeboard. Wherever possible this will be accompanied by a recent photograph of the student
  • All students on placement must adhere to the same codes of conduct as permanent staff including timekeeping and dress codes
  • All students are encouraged to contribute fully to the nursery routine and to spend some time in every area.

 

In some cases, we may include students on long term placements (aged 17 and over) and staff working as apprentices in early education (aged 16 and over) in our staff: child ratios. This will be the discretion of the manager and only will only occur when the manager is satisfied the student or apprentice is competent and responsible.

 

Supervision of Children Policy

At ABC Wonderland we have suitable staffing arrangements to meet the needs of all children and ensure their safety. The nursery manager is responsible for all staff, students, relief and agency staff receiving information on health and safety policies and procedures in the nursery in order to ensure they are adequately supervising the children, including whilst they are eating.

 

Supervision

We ensure that children are supervised adequately at all times, whether children are in or out of the building, including eating through:

  • Appropriately deploying staff members meeting the ratio and qualification requirements to ensure children’s needs are met and continuing to monitor this across the setting regularly. This includes informing parents about staff deployment and, when relevant and practical, involving them in these decisions
  • Making sure that every child is always within the sight and/or hearing of a suitably vetted member of staff
  • Completing registers as soon as soon children enter and leave the premises and carrying out head counts throughout the day
  • Risk assessing activities, experiences and equipment to ensure children are not exposed to unnecessary risks, including removal of any choking hazards and fully supervising any activities that may pose this risk
  • Ensuring children are fully supervised at all times when involved in all types of water play as we are aware that children can drown in only a few centimetres of water
  • Taking special care when children are using large apparatus e.g. a climbing frame, and when walking up or down steps or stairs
  • Support children to identify, minimise and manage risks in their play
  • Making sure staff recognise and are aware of any dangers relating to bushes, shrubs and plants when on visits or outdoors
  • Supervising children at all times when eating, monitoring toddlers and babies closely and never leaving babies alone with a bottle. Babies are always bottle fed by a member of staff
  • Supervising sleeping babies and children and never leaving them unattended
  • Never leaving babies or children unattended during nappy changing times
  • Supervising children carefully when using scissors or tools, including using knives in cooking activities where this is required
  • Increasing staff: child ratios during outings to ensure supervision and safety (please refer to Visits and outings policy)
  • Strictly following any safety guidelines given by other organisations or companies relating to the hire of equipment or services e.g. hire of a bouncy castle
  • A member of staff MUST supervise the children at all times.

Supervision of Visitors

Supervision of Visitors Policy

At ABC Wonderland we take all reasonable steps to ensure the safety of children in our care. This includes making sure any visitors to the nursery are properly identified and supervised at all times.

 

All visitors must sign the visitors’ book on arrival and departure.

 

Visitors may include prospective parents, other professionals e.g. local authority workers, Ofsted inspectors, people in the community that may come to talk to the children (e.g. librarians), contractors to complete work, deliveries etc.

 

Where applicable, we ask visitors to book in advance, so arrangements can be made to accompany them.  The identity is checked of any visitors attending in a professional capacity e.g. Ofsted inspectors, speech and language therapists.

 

All visitors are informed of any relevant policies including the Fire safety procedures and Mobile phone and electronic device use policy including the use of smartwatches.

 

We give each visitor a visitor’s badge to wear to identify themselves to staff and parents within the nursery. A member of staff must accompany visitors in the nursery at all times while in the building; at no time should a visitor be left alone with a child unless under specific circumstances arranged previously with the manager.

 

Security of premises

  • All external doors must be kept locked at all times and external gates closed. All internal doors and gates must be kept closed to ensure children are not able to leave the nursery unattended
  • Staff, parents, visitors and students are reminded not to hold doors open or allow entry to any person, whether they know this person or not. Staff within the nursery should be the only people allowing external visitors and parents entry to the nursery

 

The nursery will under no circumstances tolerate any form of harassment from third parties, including visitors, towards others, including children, staff members and parents. The police may be called in these circumstances.

 

 

Supervision Policy

At ABC Wonderland we implement a system of supervision for all of our staff following their induction and probation period. Supervision is part of the nursery’s overall performance management system and promotes a culture of mutual support, teamwork and continuous improvement. It encourages the confidential discussion of sensitive issues including the opportunity for staff and their managers to:

  • Discuss any issues – particularly concerning children’s development or well-being, including child protection concerns
  • Identify solutions to address issues as they arise
  • Receive coaching to improve their personal effectiveness
  • Develop their own skills or training needs in order to progress in their role
  • Discuss any concerns relating to changes in personal circumstances that might affect an individual’s ability or suitability to work with children. (This should include any incidents resulting in a reprimand, caution or prosecution by the police, any court orders or changes to their health. These changes are recorded as a declaration on the individual member of staff’s supervision form and appropriate action is taken, where applicable, in line with the Safeguarding children and child protection policy and Disciplinary procedure).

 

The frequency of supervision meetings is termely according to individual needs. A template agenda is used in all meetings to ensure consistency across the nursery. This clearly sets out who does what and the timeframe, i.e. what the manager is responsible for and what the practitioner needs to do.

 

There should always be something that a member of staff can discuss, e.g. a particular child’s development, strengths or concerns. However, if there are times where staff may be struggling to identify areas to discuss in a supervision, we will ask them to identify three things they have enjoyed about their job or that they have done well since the last supervision and one thing they have least enjoyed or requires further improvement. They will be asked to complete this prior to supervision (as set out in their responsibilities).

 

There may be times when supervision may be increased for members of the team as and when needed, i.e. if they have particular concerns about a child or if they are going through personal circumstances at home, for new starters, staff returning after long-term illness or on request from staff.

It is the responsibility of the manager to plan time to ensure that all staff receive supervision.

 

At ABC Wonderland supervision is carried out by the *manager. If for any reason a supervision is cancelled a new date will be rearranged within 7 days.

All members of staff responsible for carrying out supervision are trained and supported prior to carrying them out.

Staff have a responsibility to ensure that they are available for supervision meetings and that the necessary paperwork is complete. Information shared in supervision sessions is confidential. The supervision process will be evaluated twice a year through staff feedback and is used as part of the overall performance monitoring system at the nursery.

Transitions Policy

At ABC Wonderland we recognise that young children will experience many transitions in their early years; some of these planned and some unplanned. We are sensitive to the impact of such changes to children and this policy sets out the ways in which we support children going through these transitions.

 

Some examples of transitions that young children and babies may experience are:

  • Starting nursery
  • Moving between different rooms within the nursery
  • Starting school or moving nurseries
  • Family breakdowns
  • New siblings
  • Moving home
  • Death of a family member or close friend
  • Death of a family pet.

 

Staff are trained to observe their key children and to be sensitive to any changes in their behaviour and personality. We respectfully ask that parents inform us of any changes in the home environment that may impact on their child so staff can be aware of the reasons behind any potential changes in the child’s behaviour.

 

Starting nursery

We recognise that starting nursery may be difficult for some children and their families. We have a Settling in policy to support the child and their family.

 

Moving rooms procedure

When a child is ready to move to a different room in the nursery, we follow the process set out below and work with the parents to ensure this is a seamless process in which the child is fully supported at all stages. This may include a handover meeting between the existing key person, new key person and parents.

  • Planning according to the individual needs of the child and when they are ready to move
  • Enabling the child to spend short sessions in their new room, with their key person initially, prior to the permanent move to so they feel comfortable in their new surroundings and have a familiar person present at all times
  • Wherever possible transitioning groups of friends together to enable these friendships to be maintained and support the children with the peers they know
  • Keeping parents informed of all visits and the outcomes of these sessions e.g. through photographs, discussions or diary entries
  • Only transitioning the child when they feel settled and ready to move.  If a child requires more support this will be discussed between the key person, parent, manager and room leader of the new room to agree how and when this will happen. This may include moving their key person with them on a temporary basis.

 

Starting school or moving childcare providers

Starting school is an important transition and some children may feel anxious about the move. We will do all we can to facilitate a smooth transition and minimise any potential stresses. This following process relates to children going to school. However wherever possible, we will adapt this process to support children moving to another childcare provider e.g. childminder or another nursery.

  • We provide a variety of resources that relate to the school e.g. uniform to dress up in, a role play area set up as a school classroom, photographs of all the schools the children may attend and of the teachers. This helps the children to become familiar with this new concept and will aid the transition
  • Build relationships with local schools where possible throughout the year and invite them to key events or attend key events e.g. nativity, sports day
  • Invite school representatives into the nursery, where possible, or invite them to talk via online platforms such as Zoom so they have the opportunity to introduce themselves to the children
  • Where possible we use other ways to support the transition to school e.g. inviting previous children from the nursery who have moved on to school to come back and talk to the children about their school experiences
  • Where possible we plan visits to the school with the key person. Each key person will talk about the school with their key children who are due to move to school and discuss what they think may be different and what may be the same. They will talk through any concerns the child may have and initiate activities or group discussions relating to any issues to help children overcome these
  • We produce a comprehensive report on every child leaving the setting and with parental permission will share this with the school to enable teachers to have a good understanding of every child received. This will include their interests, strengths and level of understanding and development in key areas. This will support continuity of care and early learning
  • With parental permission around school allocation day, we may share details of the schools children are going to so parents can see which children may be going to the same school. This can offer some reassurance for the children to know that are moving with some familiar peers.

 

Other early years providers

Where children are attending other early years settings or are cared for by a childminder, we will work with them to share relevant information about children’s development. Where a child is brought to nursery or collected from nursery by a childminder, we will ensure that key information is being provided to the child’s parent by providing the information directly to the parent via email, video call or telephone.

 

Family breakdowns

We recognise that when parents separate it can be a difficult situation for all concerned. We have a Separated family policy that shows how the nursery will act in the best interest of the child.

 

Moving home and new siblings

We recognise that both these events may have an impact on a child. Normally, parents will have advance notice of these changes and we ask parents to let us know about these events so we can support the child to be prepared. The key person will spend time talking to the child and providing activities that may help the child to act out any worries they have e.g. through role play, stories and discussions.

 

Bereavement

We recognise that this may be a very difficult time for children and their families and have a separate Bereavement policy, which we follow to help us offer support to all concerned should this be required.

 

If parents feel that their child requires additional support because of any changes and/or transitions in their life, we ask that you speak to the nursery manager and the key person to enable this effective support to be put into place.

 

 

Use of Dummies in Nursery Policy

At ABC Wonderland we recognise that a dummy can be a source of comfort for a child who is settling and/or upset, and that it may often form part of a child’s sleep routine.

 

We also recognise that overuse of dummies may affect a child’s language development as it may restrict the mouth movements needed for speech. As babies get older, they need to learn to move their mouths in different ways, to smile, to blow bubbles, to make sounds, to chew food and eventually to talk. As babies move their mouths and experiment with babbling sounds, they are learning to make the quick mouth movements needed for speech. The more practice they get the better their awareness of their mouths and the better their speech will be.

 

Our nursery will:

  • Discuss the use of dummies with parents as part of babies’ individual care plans
  • Only allow dummies for comfort if a child is really upset (for example, if they are new to the setting or going through a transition) and/or as part of their sleep routine
  • Store dummies in individual hygienic dummy boxes labelled with the child’s name to prevent cross-contamination with other children
  • Immediately clean or sterilise any dummy or bottle that falls on the floor or is picked up by another child.
  • Dummies will be disposed of if they become damaged and/or when they are required to be disposed of.

 

When discouraging the dummy staff will:

  • Make each child aware of a designated place where the dummy is stored
  • Comfort the child and, if appropriate, explain in a sensitive manner why they do not need their dummy
  • Distract the child with other activities and ensure they are settled before leaving them to play
  • Offer other methods of comfort such as a toy, teddy or blanket
  • Explain to the child they can have their dummy when they go home or at sleep time.

 

We will also offer support and advice to parents to discourage dummy use during waking hours at home and suggest ways which the child can be weaned off their dummy through books and stories (when appropriate).

 

Visits and Outings Policy

At ABC Wonderland we offer children a range of local outings including walks and visits off the premises. We believe that planned outings and visits complement and enhance the learning opportunities inside the nursery environment and extend children’s experiences. We always seek parental permission for children to be included in such outings.

 

Procedures

Visits and outings are carefully planned using the following procedures along with any local and national guidelines, whatever the length or destination of the visit:

  • A pre-visit checklist, full risk assessment and outings plan will always be carried out by a senior member of staff before the outing to assess the risks or hazards which may arise for the children, and identify steps to be taken to remove, minimise and manage those risks and hazards. We will endeavour to visit the venue prior to the visit. This will ensure that the chosen venue is appropriate for the age, stage and development of the children
  • Written permission will always be obtained from parents before taking children out
  • We provide appropriate staffing levels for outings dependent on an assessment of the safety and the individual needs of the children.
  • At least one member of staff will hold a valid and current full paediatric first aid certificate and this will be increased where risk assessment of proposed activity deems it necessary
  • We designate one member of staff to be the outing leader, this may be the most senior member of staff attending and it will be their role to take the lead in the event of any emergencies and/or incidents (see Missing child from outings Policy) and any safeguarding or child protection concerns (see Safeguarding children and child protection policy)
  • A fully stocked first aid box will always be taken on all outings along with any special medication or equipment required
  • A completed trip register together with all parent and staff contact numbers will be taken on all outings
  • Regular headcounts will be carried out throughout the outing. Timings of headcounts will be discussed in full with the nursery manager prior to the outing
  • All staff will be easily recognisable by other members of the group; they will wear the nursery uniform and high visibility vests or jackets
  • Children will be easily identified by staff when on a trip by use of a sticker system. The nursery name, number and mobile number will be displayed
  • A fully charged nursery mobile phone will be taken as a means of emergency contact (staff are reminded of the mobile phone policy and asked to leave personal phones at the setting)
  • In the event of an accident, staff will assess the situation. If required, the group will return to nursery immediately and parents will be contacted to collect their child. In the event of a serious accident an ambulance will be called at the scene, as well as parents being contacted. One member of staff will accompany the child to the hospital, and the rest of the group will return to the nursery.

 

Risk assessment and outings plan

The full risk assessment and outing plan will be displayed for parents to see before giving consent. This plan will include details of:

  • The name of the designated person in charge – the outing leader
  • The name of the place where the visit will take place
  • The estimated time of arrival at the place where they are visiting and expected time they will arrive back at the nursery
  • The number of children, age range of children, the ratio of staff to children, children’s individual needs and the group size
  • The equipment needed for the trip i.e. first aid kit, mobile phone, coats, safety reins, pushchairs, rucksack, packed lunch etc.
  • Staff emergency contact numbers
  • Method of transportation and travel arrangements (including the route)
  • Financial arrangements
  • Emergency procedures
  • The name of the designated first aider and the first aid provision
  • The name of the designated safeguarding lead for the outing
  • Links to the child’s learning and development needs.

 

Use of vehicles for outings

  • All staff members shall inform parents in advance of any visits or outings involving the transportation of children away from the nursery
  • The arrangements for transporting children will always be carefully planned and where necessary additional staff or volunteers will be used to ensure the safety of the children. This is particularly important where children with disabilities are concerned
  • All vehicles used in transporting children are properly licensed, inspected and maintained
  • Regular checks are made to the nursery vehicle e.g. tyres, lights etc. and a logbook of maintenance, repairs and services is maintained
  • The nursery vehicle is to be kept in proper working order, is fully insured for business use and is protected by comprehensive breakdown cover
  • Drivers of vehicles are adequately insured
  • All vehicles used are fitted to the supplier’s instructions with sufficient numbers of safety restraints appropriate to the age and/or weight of the children carried in the vehicle. Any minibuses or coaches are fitted with 3-point seat belts
  • When we use a minibus, we check that the driver is over 21 years of age and holds a Passenger Carrying Vehicle (PCV) driving licence. This entitles the driver to transport up to 16 passengers
  • When children are being transported, we maintain ratios.

 

When planning a trip or outing using vehicles, records of vehicles and drivers including licenses, MOT certificates and business use insurance are checked. If a vehicle is used for outings the following procedures will be followed:

  • Ensure seat belts, child seats and booster seats are used
  • Ensure the maximum seating is not exceeded
  • All children will be accompanied by a registered member of staff
  • No child will be left in a vehicle unattended
  • Extra care will be taken when getting into or out of a vehicle
  • The vehicle will be equipped with a fire extinguisher and emergency kit containing warning triangle, torch, blankets, wheel changing equipment etc.

 

Missing children

In the event of a child going missing, the Missing child from outings policy will be followed. Any incidents or accidents will be recorded in writing and Ofsted will be contacted and informed of any incidents.

 

There may be opportunities for parents to assist on outings. The manager will speak to parents prior to the visit regarding health and safety and code of conduct.

 

In the event of an emergency

In the event of an emergency whilst out on a visit, we encourage staff to find a safe haven and remain there until the danger passes. If necessary, the police will be contacted if it is safe to do so. Each outing will have a detailed risk assessment, which covers all these risks and is planned ahead.

 

This could cover other issues such as extreme weather or emergencies such as an ill or injured child, etc.

 

We will contact parents of the children on the visit to confirm arrangements as soon as it is safe to do so.

 

Ofsted will be contacted and informed of any incidents.

 

Further information can be found at:

https://www.counterterrorism.police.uk/safetyadvice/

Supervisions

EYFS: 3.21, 3.22

At ABC WONDERLAND we implement a system of supervision for all of our staff following their induction and probation period. Supervision is part of the nursery’s overall performance management system and promotes a culture of mutual support, teamwork and continuous improvement. It encourages the confidential discussion of sensitive issues including the opportunity for staff and their managers to:

  • Discuss any issues – particularly concerning children’s development or well-being, including child protection concerns
  • Identify solutions to address issues as they arise
  • Receive coaching to improve their personal effectiveness
  • Develop their own skills in order to progress in their role
  • Discuss any concerns relating to changes in personal circumstances that might affect an individual’s ability/suitability to work with children.

The frequency of supervision meetings is bi-monthly according to individual needs. A template agenda is used in all meetings to ensure consistency across the nursery. This clearly sets out who does what and the timeframe, i.e. what the manager is responsible for and what the practitioner needs to do.

There should always be something that a member of staff can discuss, e.g. a particular child’s development, strengths or concerns. However, if there are times where staff may be struggling to identify areas to discuss in a supervision we will ask them to identify three things they have enjoyed about their job/done well since the last supervision and one thing they have least enjoyed/requires further improvement. They will be asked to complete this prior to supervision (as set out in their responsibilities).

There may be times when supervision may be increased for members of the team as and when needed, i.e. if they have particular concerns about a child or if they are going through personal circumstances at home, for new starters, staff returning after long-term illness, on request from staff. It is the responsibility of the manager to plan time to ensure that all staff have supervisions. At ABC WONDERLAND supervision is carried out by the manager. If for any reason a supervision is cancelled a new date will be rearranged within 7 days.

All members of staff responsible for carrying out supervisions are trained and supported prior to carrying these out. Supervision meetings also offer regular opportunities for members of staff to raise any changes in their personal circumstances that may affect their suitability to work with children. This should include any incidents resulting in a reprimand, caution or prosecution by the police, any court orders or changes to their health.]. These changes are recorded as a declaration on the individual member of staff’s supervision form and appropriate action is taken, where applicable, in line with the safeguarding/child protection and disciplinary procedure. Staff have a responsibility to ensure that they are available for supervision meetings and that the necessary paperwork is complete. Information shared in supervision sessions is confidential. The supervision process will be evaluated once/twice a year through staff feedback and is used as part of the overall performance monitoring system at the nursery.

Volunteers Policy

At ABC Wonderland we recognise the immense benefits that volunteers bring to the nursery. In return we hope to give volunteers an opportunity to share their skills in a different environment and to undertake new experiences.

 

Status of volunteers

A volunteer is not an employee and will not have a contract of employment with the nursery. We will, however, insist that the volunteer follows all nursery procedures in the same manner as a paid employee to ensure consistency, safety and quality of care and early learning for the children. Volunteers will be supervised at all times.

 

Enhanced Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) check

All volunteers will have suitability checks conducted in the same way as paid employees. This will include an enhanced DBS check. These checks will be conducted before any volunteer starts their time within the nursery and will also include two written references.

 

Training

Volunteers will be offered training and/or support as appropriate. We will provide any training and support required for the role, including safeguarding and child protection, paediatric first aid (where applicable) and health and safety training. The purpose of this is to enable the volunteer to be supported and enhance their development in their voluntary role within our team.

 

Policies and procedures

Volunteers are expected to comply with all the nursery’s policies and procedures. The volunteer’s induction process will include an explanation of this.

Confidentiality

Volunteers should not disclose information about the nursery, staff, children and families as stated in the Data protection and confidentiality policy and should follow the nursery confidentiality procedures at all times.

Volunteer’s induction pack

On commencing their volunteer work, the volunteer will be given a pack containing:

  • General information about the nursery
  • A copy of the Volunteers policy
  • A confidentiality statement which will require reading, signing and returning to the nursery manager
  • Details of access to all nursery relevant policies and procedures.
  • During the induction period, volunteers will read the main policies of the nursery including Safeguarding children and child protection, Health and safety – general policy and Promoting positive behaviour policy. The designated member of staff will discuss the policies to ensure the volunteer understands and adheres to this.

Volunteer support

The nursery has a designated officer who will take the volunteer through their induction and support and advise them throughout their time in the nursery.

Whistleblowing Policy

Whistleblowing is the term used when a worker passes on information concerning wrongdoing.

 

At ABC Wonderland we expect all our colleagues, both internal and external, to be professional at all times and hold the welfare and safety of every child as their paramount objective. We recognise that there may be occasions where this may not happen and we have in place a procedure for staff to disclose any information that suggests children’s welfare and safety may be at risk.

 

We expect all team members to talk through any concerns they may have with their line manager at the earliest opportunity to enable any problems to be resolved as soon as they arise.

 

Legal framework

The Public Interest Disclosure Act 1998, commonly referred to as the ‘Whistleblowing Act’, amended the Employment Rights Act 1996 to provide protection for employees who raise legitimate concerns about specified matters. These are called ‘qualifying disclosures.’

 

A qualifying disclosure is one made in the public interest by an employee who has a reasonable belief that any of the following is being, has been, or is likely to be, committed:

  • A criminal offence
  • A miscarriage of justice
  • An act creating risk to health and safety
  • An act causing damage to the environment
  • A breach of any other legal obligation or concealment of any of the above
  • Any other unethical conduct
  • An act that may be deemed as radicalised or a threat to national security.

 

Disclosures do not have to be made ‘in good faith’ but they must be made in the public interest. This is essential when assessing a disclosure made by an individual.

 

The Public Interest Disclosure Act has the following rules for making a protected disclosure:

  • You must believe it to be substantially true
  • You must not act maliciously or make false allegations
  • You must not seek any personal gain.

 

It is not necessary for the employee to have proof that such an act is being, has been, or is likely to be, committed; a reasonable belief is sufficient.

 

Disclosure of information

If, in the course of your employment, you become aware of information which you reasonably believe indicates that a child is, or may be, or is likely to be, in risk of danger and/or one or more of the following may be happening, you MUST use the nursery’s disclosure procedure set out below:

  • That a criminal offence has been committed or is being committed or is likely to be committed
  • That a person has failed, is failing or is likely to fail to comply with any legal obligation to which they are subject (e.g. EYFS, Equalities Act 2010)
  • That a miscarriage of justice has occurred, is occurring, or is likely to occur
  • That the health or safety of any individual has been, is being, or is likely to be endangered
  • That the environment, has been, is being, or is likely to be damaged
  • That information tending to show any of the above, has been, is being, or is likely to be deliberately concealed.

 

Disclosure procedure

  • If this information relates to child protection and safeguarding then the nursery’s Safeguarding children and child protection policy should be followed, with particular reference to the staff and volunteering section
  • Where you reasonably believe one or more of the above circumstances listed above has occurred, you should promptly disclose this to your manager so that any appropriate action can be taken. If it is inappropriate to make such a disclosure to your manager (i.e. because it relates to your manager) you should speak to Louise wright or MASH 03456061499
  • Employees will suffer no detriment of any sort for making such a disclosure in accordance with this procedure. For further guidance in the use of the disclosure procedure, employees should speak in confidence to the *nursery manager
  • Any disclosure or concerns raised will be treated seriously and will be dealt with in a consistent and confidential manner and will be followed through in a detailed and thorough manner
  • Any employee who is involved in victimising employees who make a disclosure, takes any action to deter employees from disclosing information or makes malicious allegations in bad faith will be subject to potential disciplinary action which may result in dismissal
  • Failure to report serious matters can also be investigated and potentially lead to disciplinary action which may result in dismissal
  • Any management employee who inappropriately deals with a whistleblowing issue (e.g. failing to react appropriately by not taking action in a timely manner or disclosing confidential information) may be deemed to have engaged in gross misconduct which could lead to dismissal
  • We give all of our staff the telephone numbers of the Local Authority Designated Officer (LADO), the local authority children’s social care team and Ofsted so all staff may contact them if they cannot talk to anyone internally about the issues or concerns observed.